HM Prison Kilmarnock

Executive Summary

1. OVERVIEW Setting the Scene 1.1 Kilmarnock was Scotland’s first private prison. It opened over 13 years ago and is now run by Serco under a 25 year contract. The fabric of the prison remains good which suggests that the buildings have been well managed and cared for over the years. The prison is also kept very clean. 1.2 HMP Kilmarnock is operated under a contract issued by Scottish Ministers to Kilmarnock Prison Service Limited (KPSL). The contract is output based and performance by the operating sub-contractor, Serco, against these outputs and the contractual terms and conditions is monitored by the Scottish Prison Service (SPS) on behalf of Scottish Ministers. SPS does not prescribe the manner in which resources are allocated by KPSL or its operating sub-contractor and it is for the contractor to ensure service delivery and standards are met and that continuous improvement is sought by efficient working practices. Inspection of Kilmarnock 1.3 Under the initiative of the Director, Kilmarnock was undergoing a considerable amount of transformational change at the time of the inspection. There are a number of areas which this report suggests require improvement but there was good evidence to show that the Director’s change programme will address many of these. Overall, I was impressed by the leadership of the Director in setting the focus on improvement and change. Nevertheless, I emphasise the need to complete the change programme as soon as possible. In terms of leadership, I would also like to see managers become more confident in their abilities and take more responsibility for decisions that should be taken at the most appropriate level. 1.4 The prison is safe and prisoners are treated well. Levels of violence are stable compared with the previous report; 82% of prisoners say they feel safe which compares favourably with other prisons. 1.5 I was impressed by the ‘kiosk’ technology which allows prisoners to manage their own visits, menus and access to education and work. I am also pleased to see that the staff are well trained and that the catering staff and the PE staff provide a particularly good service. Pastoral care in the prison is excellent. 1.6 “Out of cell activities are limited and lack stimulation” (paragraph 4.1). Access to activities is insufficiently good, with only 40% of prisoners out of the house blocks during the day. For example, only 200 prisoners were accessing work during the inspection and 22% accessing education. I was not satisfied that the quality of work was sufficiently good. In some workshops some prisoners have no work to do and spend much of the time drinking tea or watching other prisoners who do have work allocated to them. I recommend that access to work, vocational training and education is improved, and that the quality of education and work needs to improve (paragraphs 4.18 to 4.22) 1.7 Although there are good points in the prison’s healthcare provision, not least the mental health area, smoking cessation, dental treatment and alcohol programme, I have serious concerns about many aspects of healthcare access, treatment, management and addictions work. Prisoners are very agitated about this whole area. I recommend, in the light of the transfer to the NHS and based on this report, that the overall standard of healthcare at Kilmarnock is reviewed. 1.8 The prison runs an Incentives and Earned Privileges scheme (IEP): Prisoners are categorised as Basic, Standard or Enhanced. They arrive with Standard status and can either attract privileges and move up to Enhanced or be penalised and reduce downwards. However reduction to Basic can impinge on family visits which I deem to be unfair. The oversight of the scheme should be reviewed (paragraph 4.9). Summary 1.9 In summary, Kilmarnock has a good and enthusiastic team who work very hard to deliver the services required by the Scottish Prison Service. There is a great deal of change being implemented at the prison and I expect these changes and responses to my recommendations to deliver improvements in the areas that this report highlights.

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Contents

The Scottish Ministers

Key Facts

Overview

Safety

Decency, Humanity and Respect for Legal Rights

Opportunities for Self-Imporovement na Access ti Servicies and Activities

Good Practice

Recommendations

Action Points

Annex 1 Sources of Evidence

Annex 2 Inspection Team

The Scottish Ministers

In accordance with my terms of reference as Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland, I forward a report of a full inspection carried out at HMP Kilmarnock between 26 September and 3 October 2011.

Ten recommendations and a number of other points for action are made. The report highlights 16 areas of good practice.

Hugh Monro

HUGH MONRO CBE
HM Chief Inspector of Prisons
December 2011

KEY FACTS

Location

HMP Kilmarnock is located to the South East of Hurlford and Kilmarnock off the A76 road to Dumfries.

Role

The prison holds remand, short-term and long-term adult convicted prisoners and young offender remands. It services Ayr and Kilmarnock Sheriff Courts and the District Courts within East, North and South Ayrshire.

History

Kilmarnock opened on 25 March 1999. It was the first privately operated prison in Scotland and is run by Serco under a 25 year contract.

Design Capacity

500.

Population on First Day of Inspection

647.

Accommodation

Kilmarnock has two house blocks, each with four wings. The wings are self contained and have their own dining area, laundry, exercise yard and recreation area. There is also a Health Centre and Segregation Unit.

Last inspected

The last full inspection was carried out in September 2007.

1. OVERVIEW

Setting the Scene

1.1 Kilmarnock was Scotland's first private prison. It opened over 13 years ago and is now run by Serco under a 25 year contract. The fabric of the prison remains good which suggests that the buildings have been well managed and cared for over the years. The prison is also kept very clean.

1.2 HMP Kilmarnock is operated under a contract issued by Scottish Ministers to Kilmarnock Prison Service Limited (KPSL). The contract is output based and performance by the operating sub-contractor, Serco, against these outputs and the contractual terms and conditions is monitored by the Scottish Prison Service (SPS) on behalf of Scottish Ministers. SPS does not prescribe the manner in which resources are allocated by KPSL or its operating sub-contractor and it is for the contractor to ensure service delivery and standards are met and that continuous improvement is sought by efficient working practices.

Inspection of Kilmarnock

1.3 Under the initiative of the Director, Kilmarnock was undergoing a considerable amount of transformational change at the time of the inspection. There are a number of areas which this report suggests require improvement but there was good evidence to show that the Director's change programme will address many of these. Overall, I was impressed by the leadership of the Director in setting the focus on improvement and change. Nevertheless, I emphasise the need to complete the change programme as soon as possible. In terms of leadership, I would also like to see managers become more confident in their abilities and take more responsibility for decisions that should be taken at the most appropriate level.

1.4 The prison is safe and prisoners are treated well. Levels of violence are stable compared with the previous report; 82% of prisoners say they feel safe which compares favourably with other prisons.

1.5 I was impressed by the 'kiosk' technology which allows prisoners to manage their own visits, menus and access to education and work. I am also pleased to see that the staff are well trained and that the catering staff and the PE staff provide a particularly good service. Pastoral care in the prison is excellent.

1.6 "Out of cell activities are limited and lack stimulation" (paragraph 4.1). Access to activities is insufficiently good, with only 40% of prisoners out of the house blocks during the day. For example, only 200 prisoners were accessing work during the inspection and 22% accessing education. I was not satisfied that the quality of work was sufficiently good. In some workshops some prisoners have no work to do and spend much of the time drinking tea or watching other prisoners who do have work allocated to them. I recommend that access to work, vocational training and education is improved, and that the quality of education and work needs to improve (paragraphs 4.18 to 4.22)

1.7 Although there are good points in the prison's healthcare provision, not least the mental health area, smoking cessation, dental treatment and alcohol programme, I have serious concerns about many aspects of healthcare access, treatment, management and addictions work. Prisoners are very agitated about this whole area. I recommend, in the light of the transfer to the NHS and based on this report, that the overall standard of healthcare at Kilmarnock is reviewed.

1.8 The prison runs an Incentives and Earned Privileges scheme (IEP): Prisoners are categorised as Basic, Standard or Enhanced. They arrive with Standard status and can either attract privileges and move up to Enhanced or be penalised and reduce downwards. However reduction to Basic can impinge on family visits which I deem to be unfair. The oversight of the scheme should be reviewed (paragraph 4.9).

Summary

1.9 In summary, Kilmarnock has a good and enthusiastic team who work very hard to deliver the services required by the Scottish Prison Service. There is a great deal of change being implemented at the prison and I expect these changes and responses to my recommendations to deliver improvements in the areas that this report highlights.

2. SAFETY

Outcome

Appropriate steps are taken to ensure that individual prisoners are protected from harm by themselves and others.

2.1 The prison is safe in terms of levels of violence and the suicide risk management processes work well. The allocation of prisoner security levels is fair and transparent.

Standards

Safety

Prisoners are safe at all times: while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.[1]

Reception

2.2 All prisoners are searched at the point of entry to the prison, and as soon as is practical during the reception process they are then strip searched and asked to sit on the BOSS Chair (a detector for internally secreted items). Staff also check warrants and prisoners are placed in one of two holding rooms. Protection prisoners are kept apart from other prisoners.

2.3 There are notices in the holding rooms which help to identify prisoners who do not speak English as a first language. Staff also demonstrated knowledge about what to do when someone was identified as not speaking English. There are robust arrangements in place for identifying the language spoken by foreign nationals. Telephone interpretation services are available through 'The Big Word'.

2.4 Although the Reception area itself is not designed for large numbers coming into, or going out of, the prison, it felt safe and was clean and bright.

2.5 As part of the reception process, prisoners are interviewed in a small room in the Reception area. Personal details are added to both the SPS and Kilmarnock computerised Prisoner Records Systems. The suicide risk (High Risk Assessment and Teamwork - HRAT) interview also takes place here. Staff take care to identify vulnerable prisoners and several cases were identified and processed appropriately during the inspection. The HRAT process is described in detail at paragraphs 2.16-2.24. After the HRAT interview a private medical interview takes place.

2.6 The reception and discharge processes were very slow with inspectors witnessing some receptions being held in the area for over five hours. Some prisoners being discharged were in reception for over 1½ hours. Records suggest that prisoners being admitted spend an average of three hours in reception.

2.7 Access for disabled prisoners is good and these prisoners can be accommodated throughout the reception process.

2.8 A peer supporter is available to guide new prisoners where necessary. He was able to reassure prisoners and give them practical advice to help them settle in. The peer supporter was trained by induction staff prior to taking up the post.

2.9 Two newly admitted prisoners were 'tracked' by inspectors during the week. Feedback from them suggests that they found the admission process good in relation to staff attitudes and understanding, but felt that the process times were too long. They said that they were kept well informed and felt safe.

2.10 Medication is issued prior to release or attending court. Property is checked, strip searching (including the BOSS chair) takes place and handover processes are good.

2.11 In the 2009 SPS Prisoner Survey 37% of prisoners felt that it was tense or very tense in reception.

During the Night

2.12 The night staff complement comprises one Supervisor, nine Prisoner Custody Officers, an operational support grade and one nurse. All staff of these grades work night duty as part of their normal rostered duties. They are all assigned to areas where they would usually work during the day, so they are familiar with the prisoners.

2.13 Emergency orders were available for scrutiny. These are comprehensive, and include contingency plans. Night Shift Orders were old and undated. There was no index to check that they were complete. Not all of the night staff who were asked were able to identify what the packs were. However all staff were able to answer questions about what to do in different kinds of emergency situations. The night information packs should be reviewed and staff made aware of their content.

2.14 All night staff are first-aid trained. This is an area of good practice.

2.15 The night shift is visited at least once a month by senior managers as well as SPS controllers. These visits are logged in a night visit book. All areas have access to sanitation during the night. A security issue arose during the inspection with the night access procedure: this was brought to the attention of the Director.

Suicide Risk Management

2.16 The suicide risk management strategy is known as "High Risk Assessment and Teamwork" (HRAT). There are three levels. Level 1 is the highest and those on that level may be subject to constant supervision. Level 2 has a minimum of four observations per hour and Level 3 prisoners are supervised at least once every 30 minutes.

2.17 The HRAT process is managed by the Psychology Team. This was previously well attended but had not met for several months after the Senior Psychologist left. The Assistant Director for Offender Outcomes does plan to re-commence the Safer Custody Group which will be chaired by a Residential Manager.

2.18 Although all admissions to the prison are risk assessed through the HRAT process this does not happen when they return from court. The prisoner is not reassessed for potential risks when circumstances have changed at court.

2.19 Director's Rule 4.2 states that any newly admitted prisoner who was managed under HRAT in the last six months must automatically be placed on HRAT. This can lead to a prisoner being managed under HRAT for several days without having been assessed for current indication of risk. This does not allow prisoners to be managed as individuals and could be detrimental to their mental wellbeing as a result of the level of isolation experienced in the in-patient facility. It is recommended that HRAT is reviewed and that the sharing of best practice should be further developed to ensure that prisoners transferring from public to private prisons, or vice versa, experience no difference in terms of standards of care or treatment.

2.20 All prisoners who are on levels 1 and 2 HRAT supervision are accommodated in the in-patient facility in the Health Centre. At the time of the inspection there were two prisoners in this area on HRAT. Healthcare and operational staff reported difficulty in progressing prisoners in this situation back into the house blocks. One prisoner in this situation claimed that he felt afraid of moving to the mainstream and would have preferred to have been accommodated in one of the house blocks from his first night in custody. The decision to accommodate all level 1 and 2 HRAT prisoners in the in-patient facility in the Health Centre should be reviewed.

2.21 Examination of live HRAT documents showed that the process was adhered to and care plans were detailed and logically set out. However, operational staff felt that the strategy is owned by psychology and they do not participate fully in the process.

2.22 There are currently eight Listeners, five of whom are new to the role. The Listeners are trained by the Samaritans, although they only provide training once a year. This can mean a significant time can pass before Listeners can be replaced which causes additional work for the others.

2.23 The Listeners co-ordinator has been in this role for several years and is pro-active in maintaining a service. The Assistant Director for Offender Outcomes is responsible for the Listeners scheme and intends increasing the number of co-ordinators to improve the service.

2.24 The Listeners felt they had been adequately trained and those who most recently completed the training were particularly enthusiastic. Those who were already Listeners were given the opportunity to participate in delivering the training through role play and sharing their experiences. All of those involved felt this was very beneficial.

Use of Force

Force is only used as a last resort and then strictly according to law and procedures.

2.25 Staff Training Records indicated compliance was being maintained in relation to Control and Restraint competence levels.

Protection from Violence and Harm

Prisoners are protected from violence and harm by other prisoners.

2.26 Between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2011 there were no serious prisoner-on-staff assaults, and 12 minor assaults. In the same period there were seven serious prisoner-on-prisoner assaults and 177 minor assaults (this was a rise of 48 from the previous year). There were no acts of concerted indiscipline. Nine weapons were found at the point of entry into the prison in Reception.

2.27 Good relationships between staff and prisoners encourage reporting of assaults.

2.28 The 2009 SPS Prisoner Survey indicated that 82% of prisoners who responded said that they felt safe in Kilmarnock. This compares favourably to other prisons.

2.29 Policies on separating protection prisoners from other prisoners, instigating special security measures and cell sharing risk assessments were all operating effectively.

2.30 The anti-bullying process is adequate: wing supervisors have ownership of the process and it is used appropriately.

2.31 The arrangements for perimeter and front of house security are robust. The use of equipment to aid security is evident throughout the prison.

2.32 Generally, dynamic security is also good, with the controlled movement of prisoners being conducted efficiently. Escorting of prisoners from location to location was observed throughout the period of the inspection and in all instances there appeared to be an appropriate distance between the member of staff and the prisoner, and good dialogue between both parties indicating reasonable control in a relaxed atmosphere.

Allocation of Security Levels

Security levels for individuals are no higher than is necessary to meet the risk presented by the prisoner.

2.33 The process in place to allocate supervision levels is compliant with national standards and timescales. The security allocation form (PSS1) is completed by the Risk Management Team, who have access to all the relevant information. An objective decision is made and there is good flexibility over review dates.

Transparency of Security Levels

Procedures for deciding security levels are as transparent as is compatible with the sensitivities of the decision.

2.34 Kilmarnock uses the SPS Prisoner Supervision System (PSS) and is the only prison (that inspectors have identified) which holds PSS Boards where the prisoner is invited to attend. ICM staff also take part in this process. The Health Centre also contributes regarding health or vulnerability issues. The Prisoner Supervision System Boards are an area of good practice.

2.35 The downgrade system is also transparent and fair.

2.36 When prisoners are awarded a low supervision status they are provided with information about transfer to open conditions. Prisoners have sight of, and sign, the relevant documentation relating to their supervision level, and the outcomes are recorded on PR2. There was evidence of sound use of discretion in deciding supervision levels.

3. DECENCY, HUMANITY AND RESPECT FOR LEGAL RIGHTS

Outcomes

Prisoners are treated with respect for their dignity while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.[2]

3.1 Prisoners are treated with respect for their dignity at all times.

Prisoners are held in conditions that provide the basic necessities of life and health, including adequate air, light, water, exercise in the fresh air, food, bedding and clothing.

3.2 The living accommodation is clean and the fabric and fittings are in a good condition. Prisoners, except prisoners on protection, have access to one hour's exercise in the fresh air. The catering arrangements and the arrangements for issuing clothing and bedding are also good.

Prisoners are treated with respect by prison staff.

3.3 Relationships between staff and prisoners are in general good. Staff usually address prisoners by their first name. Mutual respect was observed during reception, searches, escorting and visits, and in the Links Centre, Multi-Faith Centre and Learning Centre.

Good contact with family and friends is maintained.

3.4 The prison puts a lot of effort into providing good quality visits and a number of initiatives for families and prisoners are in place and are given a high priority. The visitors check in centre and the visits room provide a welcoming environment. Prisoners often get more than their visits entitlement. Visitors are well treated by staff.

Prisoners' entitlements are accorded them in all circumstances without facing difficulty.

3.5 The complaints system and disciplinary procedures are working effectively and prisoners have access to a range of legal texts, Human Rights texts and Prison Rules. There was no evidence of racial or disability discrimination by staff towards prisoners.

Standards

Accommodation

The accommodation is clean and provides a reasonable amount of space for each prisoner, with space for personal belongings, ventilation, a reasonable temperature, natural light.

House Block 1

3.6 During the inspection house block 1 held 245 prisoners. The house block held mainly long-term prisoners (209) as well as a small number of short-term prisoners (19) and prisoners who had been recalled from licence (17). The house block has four wings on two floors. No prisoners were sharing a cell.

Each wing has four telephones and prisoners were satisfied with the access they received to these telephones.

3.7 Each wing has a laundry and this arrangement appeared to work well.

3.8 Prisoners have a choice of eating in their cells or eating in association. There are 64 seating places along with heated serving units and sinks for washing food containers, plates, cups and other utensils. Prisoners retain their own plates, bowls and cutlery and wash these in the sinks in their cells.

3.9 A recreation area is provided in each wing, and although there were some variations between wings, the areas usually included a half size snooker table, darts and some fitness equipment. Irons and ironing boards are also kept in these areas. However, the recreation areas are cramped and in a poor state of repair. Some of the fitness equipment was broken, darts were missing, snooker cues were broken and irons and ironing boards were showing signs of wear and tear. Seats were also torn.

3.10 The recreation areas are rarely used and prisoners either walk around aimlessly or sit in their cells talking to other prisoners. The recreation areas should be refurbished and ways should be found to make the time more purposeful.

3.11 The communal areas in the house block were clean: between 10 and 16 cleaners are employed in each wing. The fabric of the buildings indicated that this level of activity is part of an ongoing cleaning and maintenance programme which is an area of good practice.

3.12 All areas outside the house blocks were also clean.

3.13 Each wing has eight shower cubicles. The showers are functional and offer a good level of privacy while allowing staff to supervise the area safely. Prisoners are able to access the showers at any time during the day.

3.14 The cells themselves were clean and the fabric and fittings were in a good condition. Each cell has an enclosed toilet and wash hand basin. The wash hand basins provide hot water and cold water which is suitable for drinking.

3.15 Cell call systems were working and lights and power sockets were also installed. The windows provide good ventilation and light.

3.16 All cells are fitted with metal bunk beds which are bolted to the wall. There is adequate storage space and two chairs. Prisoners can lock valuable possessions in a safe. Cell safety and security inspections are carried out on a regular basis.

3.17 Prisoners spoken to were content with the space and facilities available to them in the house block.

House Block 2

3.18 During the inspection house block 2 held 387 prisoners. The house block was made up mainly of short-term prisoners (336) as well as a small number of remand prisoners (40) and young offenders (11). Ten prisoners were also being held in the Segregation Unit and five in the Health Centre.

3.19 The conditions in, and configuration of, house block 2 are similar to those in house block 1 described above. The house block is clean and well looked after and prisoners were content with the space and facilities available.

Access to the Open Air

Prisoners are allowed into the open air for at least one hour every day.

3.20 Each wing in the two house blocks has its own exercise yard. Prisoners have access to their exercise area between 13.00 hrs and 14.00 hrs. During the inspection around 20 prisoners used each area during this time. However, some protection prisoners were not receiving their full entitlement of one hour in the open air.

3.21 The exercise yards are spacious, clean and free from obstruction. Jackets are available if prisoners want to use them in bad weather.

3.22 Prisoners are free to come and go as they wish during the allocated hour. However, they are not routinely searched when entering or leaving the exercise yard, and numbers in and out are not checked. The level of staffing and the location of staff supervising the exercise yards should be reviewed, and numbers in and out should be checked.

Clothing

Personal clothing is in decent condition, washed frequently and fits.

3.23 On admission to the prison, prisoners are issued with one pair of prison denim trousers, two sweat shirts, two polo shirts, three pairs of socks and three pairs of boxer shorts. If a prisoner requires another pair of denim trousers they will be provided. Prison industries also issue each prisoner with two pairs of work trousers.

3.24 Prisoners are allowed to wear their own clothing when in the residential areas. Prison clothing is worn at all other times.

3.25 In terms of washing clothes, the main prison laundry employs up to 12 prisoners at any one time.

3.26 The main laundry provides a service to the other work areas; the Health Centre; Reception; the Segregation Unit; and the kitchen.

3.27 There are also laundry facilities located in each wing. These consist of a commercial washing machine and dryer and cater for all personal laundry requirements. The facility operates throughout the day. Contingencies exist between wings to allow for the service to continue in the event of equipment breaking down. The main laundry also provides a back-up should it be required.

3.28 The laundry arrangements work well.

Bedding

Bedding is supplied and laundered at frequent intervals.

3.29 All prisoners are issued with their own bedding, including sheets, pillow cases and duvet covers on admission to the house block. They have access to the wing laundry everyday and can, if they wish, launder their bedding on a daily basis.

Hygiene

Sanitary arrangements take account of health, hygiene and human dignity.

3.30 All prisoners have access to an enclosed in-cell toilet. There is also a small sink with hot and cold running water in the cells. The cold water is suitable for drinking. Prisoners also have access to detergents and cleaning materials for their cells and for the laundry, and have the opportunity to purchase other personal hygiene products from the prison shops.

Food

Food is adequate for health, varied and religiously and culturally appropriate.

3.31 The kitchen is centrally located and food is transported in heated trolleys to the halls. It is relatively compact in size, but functions well and was clean. The kitchen also contains a 'training kitchen' which provides prisoners with SVQ Qualifications. This is an area of good practice.

3.32 The kitchen currently employs 26 prisoners with 15-20 prisoners working at any one time. Three prisoners also run and maintain the training kitchen.

3.33 The menu system is operated via the ATM kiosks in the house blocks. These display the week's menu and cater for most diets including a Healthy Option, Low Fat, Halal and Vegetarian. The kiosks give prisoners the chance to select and order their meal five days in advance. A default menu choice is in place for prisoners who have not completed their meal preference. Remand prisoners can order their meal the day before. This is an area of good practice.

3.34 The meal times are as follows:

Breakfast 07.00 hrs
Lunch 12.30 hrs
Dinner 17.30 hrs
Supper Extra bread is provided on the evening meal trolley

3.35 Catering staff visit the house blocks when meals are being served and record the temperature of the food at time of eating. This is an area of good practice.

3.36 Inspectors tasted a number of meals at the point of serving and on two occasions there had been a delay in the time taken to get the food from the kitchen to the point of serving. This was due to a delay in the numbers check. Although the temperature was maintained, the food had deteriorated and dried out.

Respect

Respect is the underlying basis of all interactions between staff and prisoners.

Relationships

3.37 Relationships between staff and prisoners are in general good. Staff usually address prisoners by their first name and if nicknames are used it is not in a derogatory manner. Staff wear their name badges at all times.

3.38 Mutual respect was observed during reception, searches, escorting and visits, and in the Links Centre, Multi-Faith Centre and Learning Centre. Prisoners confirmed that there was a good understanding of the roles and responsibilities of uniformed staff and other service providers. Prisoners are also consulted on a range of issues via regular Prisoner Information and Advice Council (PIAC) meetings. However, on several occasions staff did not challenge disrespectful attitudes towards them, such as prisoners not answering a polite request.

3.39 The 2009 SPS Prisoner Survey indicated that 92% of prisoners got on ok, well or very well with officers.

Equality and Diversity

3.40 At the time of the inspection there were eight foreign national prisoners being held. There are eight trained Equality and Diversity Officers. One of these officers identifies such prisoners during reception and addresses any immediate Equality and Diversity needs including access to translation facilities and dietary requirements. During their time in the prison, an appropriately trained member of the Links Centre monitors their treatment, management and access to their statutory rights. Religious needs are fully met by the Chaplaincy Team.

3.41 The prison has, in both house blocks, sufficient, appropriately designed living accommodation for prisoners with disabilities and the two wheelchair-bound prisoners in custody at the time of the inspection were located in cells of this type. Hearing loops are available, Personal Emergency Evacuation Plans are in place and staff are aware of which prisoners would require assistance in the event of a fire drill or evacuation.

3.42 An Equality and Diversity Committee, chaired by the Assistant Director of Human Resources and Development, is in place and comprises the Head of Catering, a Chaplain, the Canteen Supplies Manager and the Diversity Manager. Copies of the minutes from these meetings are displayed on the staff notice board and the establishment's Equality and Diversity policy is available to all staff on the intranet. Any racial incidents are logged by the Equality and Diversity Manager and reviewed and monitored through this Committee. Recent prisoner surveys have sought prisoners' views on this matter and have been used to inform focus sessions at the quarterly Equality and Diversity Committee meetings.

Staff Training

3.43 Instructors from different parts of the prison deliver all core training.

3.44 A Training Plan sets out training priorities and is based on the development plans which form part of the staff appraisal system.

3.45 The establishment is meeting most of its targets for core competency training for new staff which is delivered through a mix of e-learning, classroom teaching and simulation. There are no compulsory vocational qualifications for custodial staff, although individuals can volunteer to take one in Custodial Care if they wish.

3.46 Induction programmes are treated as core training and all staff have a plan to suit their individual learning needs.

3.47 Kilmarnock is proactive in providing training for its staff in terms taking up new posts, particularly on promotion. Development training is an area of good practice.

3.48 However, there is no child protection training delivered to staff. The daily contact with children through visits and other activities means that relevant staff should be able to recognise child protection concerns. This should be addressed.

3.49 Personal Officer awareness training is delivered after recruitment but there is nothing that prepares staff for this role when they are assigned to a wing. Wing PCOs should be given Personal Officer training and support.

3.50 Training is discussed at Training Committee meetings which should be held every two months and are attended by members of the senior management team. However, there has only been one such meeting in the ten months prior to the inspection. Training Committee meetings should be reinvigorated.

3.51 Kilmarnock has a well-qualified and experienced Health and Safety and Fire Officer who also delivers fire awareness training to staff. Core H&S courses for staff are delivered during their initial training. Staff are competent in fire evacuation and cell fire protocols. All staff who were questioned were aware of their responsibilities in this area and in the area of health and safety.

Searching

Security measures such as searching are carried out with regard to the protection of human dignity.

3.52 Security checks are carried out on all staff and visitors reporting to the prison. All staff and visitors are required to remove metal objects, belts and telephones. These are scanned and a walk through metal detector provides a further scan for metallic objects concealed about the person. This practice is applied consistently, regardless of role and grade or purpose of the visit.

3.53 Random searches are also conducted and staff and visitors are required to empty pockets and remove shoes for examination.

3.54 All searches of prisoners observed were carried out thoroughly and sensitively. Instructions given by the staff conducting the searches were clear and the reason for the search given. Staff maintain dialogue with the prisoner being searched using first names, and during strip searches using general conversation to minimise any tension which might arise. During strip searches, there were no occasions when a prisoner was fully naked or left standing barefoot on a hard surface. All searches observed, were conducted by same sex staff and necessary protective equipment was used including gloves.

3.55 Documentation was provided which clearly set out what was expected in relation to the quality and frequency of searching. Also, records relating to searches carried out by type and area were in order. From what was observed it was also clear that the importance of dialogue and respect were understood and demonstrated by staff conducting searches.

Quality of Visits

Family visits are given high priority in terms of frequency, length and quality and are not restricted as part of any disciplinary or control process.

3.56 The prison puts a lot of effort into providing good quality visits. A detailed information pack is available, setting out visit times; how to book visits; bus times; rules; authorised articles; etc. Convicted prisoners book their visits through the kiosk system and there is no booking system in place for visitors to remand prisoners who simply turn up at allocated times.

3.57 Prisoners on a basic regime receive one hours visit a week, standard regime receive two hours a week and enhanced three hours. Staff try to be flexible in terms of visits and if a visitor arrives late they will still usually receive their visit. If someone needs to leave before the end of a visit this is also usually accommodated.

3.58 The prison has a family strategy in place which also includes an action plan (see also paragraph 4.71).

3.59 A dedicated visits team is in place with 12 allocated Family Contact Officers. One of the FCOs meets all new visitors in the searching area and the FCOs share an office with the search team. There is a direct telephone number for visits. One of the FCOs is a member of the local Community Justice Authority's Family Strategy Group and well as the prison's Family Strategy Group.

3.60 A number of initiatives for families and prisoners are in place and are given a high priority. Bonding visits are available to prisoners on standard and enhanced regimes who meet certain criteria. A 'Breakfast Club' runs on Sunday mornings, although take up has been low. Children's parties are held at Christmas and Halloween, and a Barbeque and Sports Day has also been held. Negotiations were underway with East Ayrshire Council to provide two workers to deliver 'Positive Play, Play in Prison' during bonding visits. This is a programme of activities to help fathers interact with their children.

3.61 The prison was awarded a Certificate of Achievement under the Family Friendly Prison Challenge 2010.

Treatment of Visitors

Visitors are well treated.

3.62 All visitors spoken to said that they were very well treated by staff and that staff were helpful and respectful. The prison also carried out a survey of visitors' views in 2011. In this survey visitors felt that staff were helpful and polite in outside visits, in the searching area and in the visits room itself.

Visits Environment

Visits take place in the most relaxed environment compatible with security.

3.63 The visitors check in centre, located in the car park, has been very recently refurbished and offers a welcoming environment for visitors. There is a wide range of information available on well laid out notice boards. The toilets were clean and accessible. New visitors register by having their photograph and fingerprint taken. Regular visitors register through a biometric finger print scanner and then make their way into the prison. A number of visitors were observed making their way to the waiting room and no delays occurred. The security arrangements for entering the prison are very stringent, with visitors removing coats, jackets, headwear and shoes.

3.64 The waiting room also has a wide range of information about the prison and services available from community based organisations. It is clean and well laid out. Toilets were also clean and accessible. Visitors are again identified biometrically. Photographs of the 12 Family Contact Officers are located next to the door into the visits room. Waiting times were not excessive.

3.65 The visits room itself is large, bright and well decorated. Five staff supervise the visits during the week and eight or nine at weekends when the room is busier. Supervision is unobtrusive.

3.66 SERCO run an excellent, not for profit, tea bar in the visits room, which was very well used during the visits observed. The tea bar is staffed by volunteers. An unsupervised soft play area is available for very young children and an X Box and Play Station for older children. Puzzle sheets are also available. There is also a seated 'picnic' and play area just outside the visits room, although this was a bit overgrown at the time of inspection.

3.67 Overall, the visits experience is made as comfortable and accessible as possible and is an area of good practice.

Telephone Contact

Telephone contact is made as easy as possible.

3.68 There are 16 telephones in each house block (four in each wing), one in the Segregation Unit and one in the Health Centre. All telephones have privacy hoods. Prisoners can access the telephones at any time when unlocked. They can put money from personal cash into a telephone account which can be accessed via the ATM Kiosks. Prisoners are told that calls are monitored and there are notices above the telephones saying that calls will be logged.

Letters

Letter contact is made as easy as possible.

3.69 There is no limit to the number of letters which a prisoner can send if he can afford it, and there is no restriction on mail coming in. Incoming mail is distributed within four hours. All letters are opened by staff in front of the prisoner. Privileged mail is opened by prisoners.

Legal Rights

Staff are aware of their duty of care to give prisoners their legal rights. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

3.70 When prisoners arrive at Kilmarnock they usually have legal representation, although there are arrangements in place should this not be the case. However, no mention of the arrangements for appealing against their sentence is made to convicted prisoners on arrival or during induction. The right of appeal should be explained to newly sentenced prisoners on reception.

3.71 The procedure for handling Privileged Correspondence is robust. There are very few complaints from prisoners about legal correspondence: nine in the last year.

3.72 Copies of the Prison Rules are available in the library. Human rights literature and legal text books are also available.

3.73 Access to the Visiting Committee is gained through a house block request. This seems to be operating effectively and members of staff were knowledgeable about the Committee.

3.74 Foreign nationals can gain access to a consular official on request. Although this is the case, no foreign national prisoner spoken to was aware of his rights in this area. Foreign nationals should be informed of their right to access consular officials.

3.75 Disciplinary hearings are held in a suitable room in the Segregation Unit. In the procedures observed all staff were seated and the hearings were conducted in a relaxed, non-confrontational manner. The procedure is conducted on a rota basis by the SPS Controllers with holiday relief provided by the escort monitoring team.

3.76 The adjudicators ensured that the prisoner understood the charges, had enough time to prepare a defence and was ready for the hearing. All prisoners were offered a pen and paper to take notes. No prisoner was offered a copy of the Prison Rules.

3.77 In some cases relating to possession of unauthorised articles, the evidence was not produced during hearings. This should be addressed. However, there are good facilities for viewing CCTV evidence.

3.78 The process followed and the reasons for decisions and awards were understood by prisoners and the paperwork to record hearings is completed effectively.

3.79 There is an excessive number of disciplinary reports for refusing to go to work. The number of such reports can exceed 20 a day: most other Scottish Prisons have one or two. Steps should be taken to reduce the number of prisoners refusing to go to work.

3.80 Prisoners were not told that they can appeal against the result of a disciplinary hearing.

Human Rights

Staff are aware of their duty to observe the human rights of prisoners. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

3.81 European Court of Human Rights literature is available in the library and prisoners can ask staff for assistance if they wish to make an appeal (although this would usually be carried out by their legal representative).

3.82 There was no evidence of racial or disability discrimination by staff towards prisoners.

3.83 A number of non English speaking foreign nationals intimated that, apart from in Reception, they had not had access to an interpreter. The accounts for 'The Big Word' interpreting service showed that it was rarely used - on average 2.8 times a month over the last year, and this was mainly in Reception. If prisoners require the service, they should have access to interpreters.

Fairness and Natural Justice

Staff are aware of their duty to treat prisoners in accordance with fairness and natural justice. They know what this involves. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

3.84 Complaint forms are easily accessed in the house blocks. Once a complaint is raised it is entered onto PR2 which enables timescales to be monitored. The responses to complaints are always within the stipulated time unless further investigation is required. Complaints are given careful consideration and detailed reasons are given for decisions. However, complaints are not audited on a regular basis and ICC cases are not shared with other senior managers.

3.85 In 2010-11 there were 1,153 complaints made:

CP1 (general complaint) 320
CP2 (confidential access to Governor) 263
CP3 (medical) 529
CP4 (Appeal - Orderly Room decision) 41

3.86 Kilmarnock has fewer complaints than other recently inspected establishments:

Peterhead had 600 CPs/population of 299 = 2.00 per prisoner

Dumfries had 762 CPs/population of 206 = 3.69 per prisoner

Barlinnie had 1,492 CPs/population of 1,477 = 1.01 per prisoner

Kilmarnock had 1,153 CPs/population 644 = 1.79 per prisoner

3.87 Prisoners have several avenues of appeal against a response to a request or complaint. These include access to the Visiting Committee, and a senior manager. There was no evidence to suggest that prisoners are victimised for having accessed their legal right to complain.

3.88 The library has copies of the Prison Rules and the European Prison Rules. Legal texts are also available.

3.89 Disciplinary reports are dealt with fairly.

Use of Segregation

Segregation is used sparingly and in accordance with procedures.

3.90 The Segregation Unit is located in a central position in the prison. It is a single storey building with a design capacity of 16: 14 cells, one 'silent' cell and one "at risk" cell. All cells have a toilet and sink.

3.91 The standard of the furniture is good; mattresses were in a good condition; and there is a regular laundry service for clothing and bedding. Prisoners can have a television in their cell subject to certain conditions. There is good natural light and ventilation in the cells. All prisoners are offered one hour in fresh air each day and have access to a fitness room on a rotational basis. They also have access to a shower every day.

3.92 Nine prisoners were being held on the first day of inspection and Rule applications had been applied appropriately.

3.93 At least one senior manager visits prisoners every day. These visits, and the daily visits by the Chaplain are recorded. Case conferences are completed within five days for prisoners admitted on Rule 94 and monthly thereafter. The Doctor visits twice a week.

4. OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-IMPROVEMENT AND ACCESS TO SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES

Outcomes

Prisoners take part in activities that educate, develop skills and personal qualities and prepare them for life outside prison.

4.1 Out of cell activities are limited and lack stimulation. Although there is an entrepreneurial approach in workshop production areas, too few prisoners attend these workshops and there are too few vocational training programmes. Too few prisoners also attend education and the educational facility is under-utilised. The standard of pastoral care is excellent.

Healthcare is provided to the same standard as in the community outside prison, available in response to need, with a full range of preventative services, promoting continuity with health services outside prison.

4.2 A Doctor's clinic takes place six days a week, although appointments are often cancelled at short notice with no reason given.

Appropriate steps are taken to ensure that prisoners are integrated safely into the community and where possible into a situation less likely to lead to further crime.

4.3 The prison has developed an excellent range of links with community based organisations to help prisoners reintegrate back into the community. The arrangements for managing risk in relation to reintegration are also very good.

Standards

Regime

The regime of the prison encourages prisoners to make the most of their time there and to exercise responsibility

4.4 All prisoners spend their first night in the prison in the 'First Night in Custody Centre' where they are given an information booklet containing details about the regime, rules, the induction programme, canteen, visits and how to make a complaint. Peer supporters are also available to pass on information, particularly about how to use the kiosks to order meals, book visits, etc.

4.5 All new prisoners are seen by Links Centre staff, usually within 24 hours. During this time they are given information about the various services available from organisations within and outside the prison.

4.6 A full five day induction is given to all prisoners. This is a rolling programme and covers all elements of the SPS national induction programme. Local and national information is provided. Most agencies take part in the induction programme including the Lighthouse Foundation, Inside Out, Kilmarnock College and Physical Education staff. The programme includes information on the kiosk system, work allocation, wages, laundry, etc.

4.7 The information available to foreign national prisoners is less good as there is no translated information readily available.

4.8 Feedback from the two 'tracked' prisoners suggests that the induction process is adequate in helping them to learn about the prison and settle into the regime.

4.9 The prison runs an Incentives and Earned Privileges scheme (IEP): Prisoners are categorised as Basic, Standard or Enhanced. They arrive with Standard status and can either attract privileges and move up to Enhanced or be penalised and reduce downwards. However, reduction to Basic can impinge on family visits. The oversight of the Incentives and Earned Privileges scheme should be reviewed.

Out of Cell Activities

A full day's out of cell activities, such as work, education, leisure and cultural pursuits is available for seven days of the week.

4.10 The SPS currently contracts KPSL to provide access to education for prisoners through a combination of full-time sessions (Monday-Friday) and two hour evening sessions (Monday-Friday). Learning, skills and employability programmes are delivered in-house by Kilmarnock Prison staff. The provision is managed by the Education Centre Manager and a team of full-time and part-time teaching staff. At the time of inspection, the staff training manager was running the Education Centre. A range of educational programmes is delivered to remand and sentenced prisoners. A recent internal review of the prison's education provision has identified a number of areas for improvement.

4.11 Kilmarnock Prison staff oversee production areas in workshops where prisoners engage in a range of appropriate activities to meet the needs of the wider prison population. This includes cable stripping, recycling, textile production, laundry, cleaning, grounds maintenance and catering. At the time of the inspection there were no vocational workshops. Senior managers recognise that this restricts the skills development and employability prospects of prisoners. They have well-advanced plans to introduce painting and decorating, bricklaying and barbering workshop programmes in the very near future.

4.12 Managers and staff are enthusiastic and committed to improving education provision. Gym and library staff are well qualified. However, not all teaching staff delivering education programmes hold a teaching qualification. There is productive partnership working with staff from Kilmarnock College who regularly provide helpful support and advice to prisoners prior to liberation.

4.13 Accommodation within the education centre is clean, bright and welcoming. The popular gym area is well-equipped and resourced to a high standard. The computing suite contains high-quality, up-to-date ICT resources. Donated music production equipment is used effectively by prisoners to create personalised sound recordings. There is good use made of prisoners' art work to decorate corridors throughout the prison. Prisoners experience delays in repairing broken gym equipment sited in accommodation halls. The Links Centre provides purposeful accommodation for a range of external partnership agencies but is small and at times over-crowded.

4.14 Approximately 60% of prisoners enjoy regular access to physical education. The gym is popular and provides prisoners with a range of specialist equipment and a programme of self-improvement activities. Prisoners make good use of the ATM kiosk system to manage their pay and organise personal visits. Feedback received from completed prisoner questionnaires brought about recent improvements to the range of PE activities. Prisoners in art classes actively engage in purposeful activity. They produce high-quality paintings, drawings, sketches and models which have resulted in a number of national awards for the prison. Singing sessions, delivered by a local community theatre group, effectively improve prisoners' confidence and self-esteem. Both the library and PE department have effective links with a number of external partners.

4.15 Out of cell activities are limited and lack stimulation. Popular art and music classes are not available to prisoners in the evening. Overall, learning opportunities are not effectively promoted across the prison. Prisoners attending education are paid less than those attending work sheds. Gym pass men are paid less than those in halls or work sheds.

4.16 The popular library is well-resourced and is well-stocked with a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts. Prisoners can use the library five days a week and have good access to legal texts and reference books. There is a wide range of CDs, DVDs and talking books. There are a number of books which take good account of the cultural and religious background of the prisoner population. There are texts in a range of foreign languages. New stock is added to the library on a monthly basis. Six Passmen have successfully attained SVQs in librarianship and actively support fellow prisoners' reading.

4.17 The popular PE facility is well-presented and well-equipped. Access for prisoners is very good. PE staff are knowledgeable, supportive and experienced. They oversee a wide range of health, sport and fitness activities. In order to be well-prepared for exercise activities, all new gym inductees complete a 'Heartstart' qualification. PE staff make good use of a range of accredited awards including British Association of Weightlifting Awards (BAWLA), Community Sport Leadership Awards (CSLA) and Scottish Football Association (SFA) coaching. The PE department enjoys positive and productive links with a wide range of external partners. Prison staff have introduced a number of joint programmes with external partners. There are productive links with Kilmarnock Amateur Weightlifting Club which provides positive opportunities for prisoners upon liberation. In order to improve prisoners' health and wellbeing, prison staff effectively engage in partnership working with a range of health professionals. The approach adopted by PE staff is an area of good practice.

Work related Preparation for Release

The programme of work and related training focuses on equipping prisoners for employment on release.

4.18 There is an entrepreneurial approach in workshop production areas. Prison staff have negotiated a number of external contracts with a range of suppliers. These activities help to develop prisoners' employability skills and produce income for the prison. There is effective development of prisoners' skills in the textile production areas. Prisoners produce a variety of items using standalone sewing machines. They work productively and cooperatively and the finished items are produced to a high standard. Well motivated and trained Kilmarnock Prison staff provide encouragement and support which is valued by the prisoners.

4.19 The prison recognises that it needs to expand its range of vocational programmes and has well-advanced plans to introduce new workshops in painting and decorating, barbering and bricklaying. At the time of the inspection approximately 200 prisoners were attending production workshops on a weekly basis. With a current contracted prisoner population of 644, this means that large numbers of prisoners are not engaged in purposeful activity. It is recommended that the number of prisoners attending production workshops and vocational training programmes is increased.

4.20 The Links Centre provides dedicated support to prisoners when they are nearing the end of their sentences. Staff from the Job Centre help them to apply for job interviews. Effective coordination ensures that prisoners have appropriate accommodation arrangements in place when they leave the prison. The recently introduced Kilmarnock College "Inside Out" project offers a few liberated prisoners a positive route to support and further education.

4.21 There are no vocational programmes to meet the training needs of prisoners. There is inconsistent enforcement of health and safety practices in some production workshops. A number of prisoners have only recently been issued with protective footwear. Prisoners in the cable-stripping workshop do not routinely work with protective eyewear. Some prisoners use tools unsafely and as a result cause potential hazards for their work colleagues. Health and safety requirements should be enforced at all times in production workshops.

4.22 There is insufficient work for prisoners to undertake in some production workshops. All prisoners are required to attend their allocated production area. However, a number of them have no work to do and spend much of the day sitting around watching fellow prisoners who have work allocated to them. This causes boredom and frustration for prisoners and poses additional supervisory challenges for prison staff. All prisoners attending production workshops should be engaged in meaningful work activities.

Education

A broad and relevant education programme is available.

4.23 All prisoners attending the education centre value their learning. Education centre staff are enthusiastic and committed to delivering improved outcomes for prisoners. Recent staffing changes within the Education Centre have resulted in improved relationships between prisoners and teaching staff. A small number of prisoners benefit from the use of state-of-the-art music equipment. High quality prisoner literature and artwork has gained national recognition through the achievement of a number of Koestler Awards.

4.24 A comprehensive induction programme introduces prisoners effectively to their workshop and education options. The recently introduced "Big Plus Challenge" screening tool helps identify prisoners' literacy and numeracy needs. A dedicated literacy tutor provides tailored and effective one-to-one support to a small number of prisoners on residential wings. However, the overall impact of this approach is limited as many offenders with literacy and numeracy support needs do not benefit from this service. In order to identify learning targets for improvement, Individual Learning Plans have recently been introduced. However, the standard of completion is variable. Overall, there is no systematic quality assurance or development plans in place to inform improvement planning.

4.25 The computer suite is well used. It contains up-to-date computers with a range of appropriate software. It is used by a number of prisoners studying a range of programmes. Staff use their professional expertise and subject knowledge well to make classes interesting and motivating. They encourage prisoners to explore a range of topics and provide sensitive support when they find aspects of their studies challenging. Peer Tutors support prisoners well on a one-to-one basis. None of the Peer Tutors have attained accreditation for the support they provide to their fellow prisoners. Art classes are popular and there is a waiting list for those who want to take part. Overall, the education programme is limited and under-developed. There are 45 sessions each week in the education centre. Low numbers of prisoners access education programmes. A total of 139 prisoners out of a prison population of approximately 640 regularly attend education classes. This represents only 22% of the prison population. It is recommended that the number of prisoners attending education programmes is increased.

4.26 The current approach to the improvement of prisoners' literacy and numeracy skills is ineffective. The education facility is under-utilised. A number of classes contain small numbers of prisoners. Music technology classes are popular. However, only a few prisoners can participate due to equipment and space restrictions. Insufficient numbers of prisoners attain educational qualifications. When prisoners are successful and attain a national qualification their achievements are often unreported and are not celebrated widely. Communication between education staff and prison staff supervising workshop activities is ineffective. This restricts the potential improvement of prisoners' literacy and numeracy skills through their schedule of daily workshop activities. Insufficient numbers of prisoners attain vocational qualifications. More prisoners should attain vocational qualifications.

Interventions to Address Offending Behaviour

A range of interventions is in place to encourage prisoners to address those behaviours which may contribute to their offending.

4.27 Facilities for prisoners taking part in programmed interventions in Kilmarnock are limited. Most pre and post interviews and assessments take place in the Learning Centre, Links Centre or in an office in a wing in one of the halls. All of these arrangements are dependant on the goodwill of the staff in the areas concerned. Office accommodation for the psychologists is cramped.

4.28 Programme delivery itself takes place in accommodation which is comfortable and where furniture and fittings are appropriate, however due to its proximity to the gymnasium, it does not lend itself to a therapeutic atmosphere. It is recommended that a review of accommodation and associated facilities for programme delivery is undertaken.

4.29 Of the team of four psychologists who deliver CARE and Constructs, one is also responsible for overseeing the work of four trained addictions staff who deliver SROBP. The HRAT system in place in Kilmarnock for the management of those prisoners deemed to be at risk of self harm is a psychology resource intensive system which, at the time of the inspection, was taking up two days per week of one FTE psychologist's time. It is recommended that Management considers the introduction of a multi-disciplinary system for the management of prisoners deemed to be at risk of self harm.

4.30 Evidence of co-operation and joint working with PBSW and ICM staff was observed at an ICM case conference and records demonstrated relevant contributions to monthly Multi Disciplinary Mental Health Team and Risk Management Team meetings and in Segregation Unit Case Conferences minutes.

4.31 Completed programmes for the year 01 April 2010 to 31 March 2011 were:

Programme Completions De-selections
Constructs 24 5
Care 15 5
SROBP 15 5

4.32 In April this year, the psychology team undertook an establishment-wide offending behaviour needs analysis to provide a population profile and to inform the offending behaviour programmes schedule. The results showed a need for violence interventions, substance misuse interventions and domestic abuse interventions. As Kilmarnock does not deliver the Violence Prevention Programme (VPP) and because spaces available on the programme in public sector establishments are very limited, psychologists are now undertaking a series of one-to-one violence interventions with those prisoners who have demonstrated the greatest need.

4.33 As of 1 June 2011, the prison adopted the SPS generic programme assessment approach. Although in its infancy in Kilmarnock at the time of the inspection, initial feedback from psychologists and prisoners indicate that this method is more inclusive of prisoners, helps gain their consent and improves relationships between both groups. Early data suggests that waiting times between referral and assessment are shortening and the current target of four months from referral to completed assessment is being met or, in some instances, reduced.

Cultural and Voluntary Activities

There is a programme of cultural and voluntary activities.

4.34 One anti-sectarian event, 'Can you Hear the Bigots Sing?', was held during the year. The prison should hold more multi-cultural and voluntary activities.

Religious Observance

Opportunities to practice their religion are available to all prisoners

4.35 The standard of pastoral care in the prison, the facilities in which prisoners can worship and the level of purposeful activity within the Multi-Faith Centre are all areas of good practice.

4.36 There are six part time Chaplains; three Roman Catholic Priests; and three Church of Scotland Ministers. An Imam visits weekly and at the time of the inspection, representatives from both the Mormon and Buddhist faiths were also visiting the prison to cater for the religious needs of two prisoners from these respective faiths. In addition, there is a pool of some fifty community volunteers who regularly deliver groups and attend and assist with religious services.

4.37 An average 600 prisoners per month attend the Centre where, in addition to recognised services, they can take part in a range of additional interventions including the Sycamore Tree, Bible School, the Alpha Course and Master Life.

4.38 The Centre itself is spacious and comprises two main areas for worship and group work, washing facilities for Muslim worshippers, office accommodation, toilet facilities and a small tea-making area. The atmosphere is welcoming, décor is appropriate to the setting and the fabric is well maintained.

4.39 Management responsibility for Chaplaincy services lies with the Assistant Director for Offender Outcomes and the Chaplaincy team attends regular monthly meetings along with other representatives from within the Offender Outcome Group. The team also works closely with other disciplines, and has a high profile in the prison, visiting the halls, the Health Centre and the Segregation Unit on a daily basis to meet with prisoners who have been referred to them via discipline staff, psychologists, nursing staff, other prisoners or the prisoner himself. Support from the SPS Chaplaincy Advisors is provided and well received.

4.40 Both formal and informal through care arrangements were described by the Chaplains and included examples of work with ex-offenders in their local parishes such as providing help in bereavement counselling, performing marriage services and giving other types of practical help. They also work with prisoners prior to their release in conjunction with external organisations such as The Bethany Centre

4.41 Due to the part-time nature of the Chaplains contract, not all services are available on the appropriate day with Church of Scotland services taking place on Mondays and Roman Catholic services and Juma Prayers on Thursdays.

Canteen

Suitable arrangements to enable prisoners to buy a range of personal and other items that meet prisoners' needs are in place and available and accessible as necessary.

4.42 There are two shops: one in each house block. These are run by two 'shop supervisors'. Prisoners access the shops on a rotational basis: convicted prisoners have access twice a week and untried prisoners have access three times a week. Prisoners attend the canteen in person and give their prison number to the shop supervisor. After an initial security check goods are scanned by the shop supervisor. The amount is automatically taken from the prisoner's private cash account as each item is scanned so the prisoner knows exactly how much he has spent and how much he has left in his account. Prisoners can also add money to their telephone account at the shop. Discrepancies are rectified with immediate effect.

4.43 A Canteen Committee is in place, which is known locally as the 'Shop PIAC'. The Committee meets as and when necessary. The last meeting had taken place on 6 September 2011. Minutes for previous meetings were also available. A Shop PIAC prisoner representative from each hall attends as well as the Shop Supervisor. The Shop PIAC meetings are useful and prisoners stated that all items currently stocked in the shop had been influenced by themselves. They were also allowed to express their views on prices and the system in general.

4.44 The Canteen stocks a very good range of items including cards marking family, religious and cultural events. The range of goods available reflects the different cultures in prison. There is also a list of items with corresponding foreign language for foreign nationals and a symbol next to an item which is used to designate food seen as permissible according to Islamic law. This list can be taken to the halls and is made available to those prisoners who for whatever reason may not be able to attend the shop in person.

Health

Health services of a high quality are available to all who need them.

Physical Environment

4.45 The Health Centre consulting and clinical areas have limited space due to a large part of the Health Centre being used for inpatient facilities. This area is mainly used to accommodate prisoners who are being managed under the HRAT process. During the inspection there were between two and four patients in the inpatient area, one who was on HRAT and one who was currently undergoing treatment for an acute condition.

4.46 There is a treatment room, dental suite, consulting room and pharmacy in the Health Centre. Some of the areas are quite cramped, especially the dental suite but they are well equipped and clean. There is a good variety of Health Promotion materials on display and available in the Health Centre corridors although there are no posters or literature in either of the waiting rooms.

Health Care Team

4.47 Health Care services are provided by Serco Health.

4.48 There is a good skill mix among the Health Care team including primary care, addictions, mental health and health care assistants. There have been significant changes in staffing in the Health Centre including a new Mental Health Team Leader and Addictions Nurse. The Health Care Manager is also new in the post.

Primary Care Services

4.49 The primary care team consists of five nurses and a team leader. The Medical Team runs several long-term conditions clinics established by the Medical lead including Asthma, Hypertension and Diabetes. The other nurses in the primary care team are fairly new and their roles are limited to the administration of medicines and simple triage. The primary care nurses require additional training to enable them to be more affective in their role.

4.50 Ayrshire & Arran NHS provide a Blood Borne Virus service three days a week. This includes Hepatitis C testing and treatment. There were several prisoners receiving treatment. There are good relationships with the Mental Health Team and the catering department to ensure appropriate care and support for the prisoner during treatment.

4.51 There was no evidence of Care Plans being used by Primary Care staff. This had resulted in poor communication between Health Centre staff and the Doctor and limited recording of health care delivery to the individual prisoner. Care plans should be used by Primary Care staff.

4.52 Prisoners can report unfit for work Monday to Friday. They will be seen by a nurse on that day and can be listed for the Doctor if required. There are designated areas in the house blocks for the nurses to carry out the administration of medicines and triage. However, the room in house block 1 was cramped and dirty, and did not meet infection control standards with cluttered, open shelving and a hole in the ceiling. It is recommended that clinical treatments in this area stop immediately.

4.53 A Doctor's clinic takes place six days a week. The Doctors will usually see prisoners within 24 hours for urgent referrals and all other referrals are seen within seven days.

4.54 Prisoners request a Doctor's appointment through the kiosk system or by completing a self referral form to the Health Centre. The prisoner can then find out the time of the appointment, again by accessing the kiosks. Several prisoners complained that the time given by the kiosk is not the time of their actual appointment and they are given afternoon appointments on the Doctor's half days. Prisoners also stated that Doctor's appointments are cancelled at short notice and this was observed during the inspection. No reasons are given for the cancellation of clinics. The current process of booking Doctors appointments through the kiosks in the halls should be reviewed.

Mental Health Services

4.55 The Mental Health nursing team consists of five nurses and a team leader. The team leader is new in post and is currently developing the mental health services on offer.

4.56 There is a referral process in place for the Mental Health Team. Prisoners can self refer or staff can refer on their behalf. Those referred are seen within three days unless urgent, when they are seen within 24 hours.

4.57 There are self-help and guided help workbooks for prisoners with low mood and depression, sleep problems and self harm. These are completed by the prisoner along with a Mental Health Nurse. The workbooks are easy to complete and are well used by prisoners. This is an area of good practice.

4.58 The Multi-disciplinary Mental Health Team meetings only re-commenced three months before the inspection. They take place on a monthly basis. The minutes showed they were well attended but there was no representation from operational staff or managers. The meetings are chaired by the Assistant Director of Offender Outcomes. The minutes also showed there was good structure to the meetings and prisoners on HRAT were also discussed. The Multi-disciplinary Mental Health Team should meet every two weeks.

Dental Services

4.59 The dental suite is small but well equipped and clean. The waiting list is currently 10 weeks which is in line with SPS and NHS Health Care Standards. The prisoners are, in the main, content with the dental service provided.

4.60 There is provision in place for convicted prisoners to be seen as an emergency when they have severe toothache. However, remand prisoners can only be treated for toothache. There are no exceptions to this even for those serving a long period on remand. Prisoners on remand should receive dental treatment if they are to be in custody long enough for treatment to be administered.

Other Services

4.61 The optician attends the prison one day a month. The room provided is adequate for this service. The waiting list is approximately one month.

4.62 The podiatrist attends the prison once a month. There is currently no waiting list.

4.63 Pharmacy services are provided by Lloyds Pharmacy Services. This is a long standing contract and there were no significant issues raised with the supply of medication through the contract.

4.64 Supervised medication is administered three times a day in the halls in the triage room. These provide a safe and secure area for the administration of medicines.

Addictions

Addictions are dealt with the way most likely to be effective and when they conflict, treatment takes priority over security measures as far as possible.

4.65 Enhanced Addictions Casework is carried out by Caseworkers employed by Serco. There is one Addictions Manager, four case workers and one administrator. Prisoners can self refer to the addictions service although they are usually referred by health care staff on admission to the prison.

4.66 The Addictions team carry out alcohol awareness courses for prisoners. These consist of eight sessions. At the time of the inspection there were nine prisoners completing this course and there was no waiting list. This is an area of good practice.

4.67 Smoking Cessation Services are provided by NHS Ayrshire and Arran. They attend the prison one day each week and have a high level of engagement and compliance. This is an area of good practice.

4.68 The Addictions team makes Throughcare Addictions Services (TAS) referrals for all prisoners with a sentence of four years and over. Pre-release information is sent to the prescriber for all prisoners receiving Methadone.

4.69 At the time of the inspection there were 215 prisoners on a Methadone prescription. Methadone is administered in the triage area of the house block and is well managed by the operational staff in the area. The addictions nurse administers the majority of the Methadone which takes up a significant portion of his day.

4.70 In the month prior to the inspection there had been only 10 drug screen urine samples carried out. There is currently no means of assessing prisoner's compliance with their Methadone prescription, any illicit substance use or diversion of the Methadone prescription. It is recommended that a system is introduced immediately to ensure all prisoners on Methadone are tested regularly.

4.71 The prisoners on Methadone were either maintained on Methadone as they stated they received a prescription in the community or they were commenced on Methadone by the Doctor, often in the first 24 hours of entering prison. In many cases there was no evidence of community prescribers being contacted to confirm the prisoner's prescription, dose of Methadone or history of compliance. For those commenced on Methadone there was no evidence of motivational interviewing prior to starting the Methadone and there was no evidence of securing a prescriber and support for on their release. It is recommended that a community based prescriber confirms that a prisoner is on Methadone before it is commenced in the prison, and that a support package is in place before commencing a prisoner on Methadone.

4.72 There are no Addictions Review meetings carried out which means there is no formal route for the Addictions team to communicate with the Doctor regarding the prisoners they are working with and there is no way for the Doctor to communicate with the Addictions team regarding changes to treatment. The Addictions team expressed this as a concern as they were frequently asked by prisoners why their Methadone had been increased and were unable to explain as they were not part of the decision making process. Prisoners also approached the inspection team to express their confusion about their treatment

Links with Family and the Local Community

The prison has a policy on links with families and with the local community to implement it.

4.73 The prison has a Family Strategy in place which is based on the SPS Good Practice Guidelines for Working with the Children and Families of Prisoners. The Strategy also has actions required, target dates and progress against each key area. This is an area of good practice.

4.74 A Family Strategy Group is also in place. This is Chaired by one of the Assistant Directors and has representation from Families Outside, East Ayrshire Council, the Lighthouse Foundation, the Visits Manager, FCOs and Social Work. Minutes are taken of the meetings.

4.75 There is no family induction session in place and family involvement in ICM Case Conferences is variable at around 13% even though the prison actively encourages participation. The prison should look at ways of introducing a family induction session.

4.76 The prison has developed excellent links with a range of community based organisations. These include the South West Scotland Community Justice Authority, East, North and South Ayrshire Councils, the Ayrshire Alcohol and Drug Partnerships and the Throughcare Addictions Services. Very good links have been made with Kilmarnock College who run the Inside Out Programme from the Links Centre. Job Centre Plus and Aspire2gether attend the Links Centre on a daily basis and Routes Out of Prison, the Lighthouse Foundation, East Ayrshire Council and Families Outside attend on a regular basis.

4.77 The prison meets quarterly with local police and Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency Officers in relation to matters of public protection, and approval had recently been given by the police for a three month pilot of a part-time Police Liaison Officer to be based in the prison.

4.78 A number of links have also been developed with commercial businesses and the prison is a member of the Chamber of Commerce.

4.79 Overall, the prison has developed excellent links with community groups, focusing on helping the prisoner reintegrate back into the community.

Preparation for Release

Arrangements are made for prisoners to leave with somewhere appropriate to live, healthcare, continuity assured, a chance to find work and build social links.

Home Detention Curfew

4.80 At the time of inspection there were 12 prisoners on Home Detention Curfew.

4.81 The Risk Management Unit administers the HDC processes. The system for identifying prisoners who are eligible for HDC is robust and fair. An initial list of prisoners about ten weeks away from the eligibility date is drawn from PR2 every week. Application forms are sent to prisoners through the internal post.

4.82 Completed applications are assessed by one of the SPS Controllers. The next stage is completion of a home circumstances report by Community Based Social Work. The Controllers make the final decision once the report has been returned to the prison. Prisoners are kept informed by internal mail throughout the process. Once a prisoner is approved for release an information leaflet (prepared by Families Outside) is sent to the prisoner to send out to family members.

4.83 There is good communication with internal partners and the police. SERCO and social workers are kept informed when someone has approval for release.

4.84 The appeal process is through the CP system and answered by the line manager of the Controllers.

4.85 Kilmarnock has a very good protocol for dealing with people who are on HDC who just turn up at the gate to hand themselves in. This is an issue that can have consequences as returnees are often pressured into bringing contraband into the prison. The protocol safeguards against this and is an area of good practice.

Risk Management Team

4.86 All Risk Management Team (RMT) meetings held at HMP Kilmarnock are chaired by the Director and are scheduled to take place once per month. Through discussion with the chairperson, members of the RMT and prisoners and from information gleaned from RMT minutes, it is clear that appropriate, evidenced-based processes and procedures for making defensible decisions about prisoners' progression are in place.

4.87 In addition to progression cases, referrals to the RMT include prisoners subject to Order for Lifelong Restriction (OLR), prisoners subject to Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA), prisoners whose behaviour poses considerable risk and who would benefit from further, in-depth assessment and management and prisoners who need to be considered by the ECMDP prior to transfer to open conditions

4.88 Neither of the two Kilmarnock prisoners who held Orders of Lifelong Restriction status were, at the time of the inspection, due to have their annual risk management plans ratified and submitted to the Risk Management Authority for approval, however referral procedures for the other prisoner groups noted above were examined and found to be compliant with the recognised guidelines.

4.89 Progression paperwork with pre-qualifying information is made widely available to eligible prisoners and staff are sufficiently skilled and informed to support them in their application.

4.90 The RMT minutes reviewed demonstrate that the core membership of the team is correct and that all relevant information is available to the team in advance. Similarly, the records show that prisoners' risks and needs are identified and discussed and a record of those discussions and any decisions taken are made by the Director.

4.91 Appropriate methods of communicating decisions to the prisoner are used and, for those who are deemed suitable for progression to less secure conditions, information leaflets are made available to them. In addition, the electronic records checked on PR2 are up to date and a check with the Open Estate provided assurance that processes to pass on relevant information quickly and accurately are in place.

4.92 A video and information package aimed at prisoners who have been assessed as suitable for progression has been produced by the Open Estate but was not available to HMP Kilmarnock at the time of the Inspection. It is recommended that action is taken to access this information.

4.93 During the year leading up to the Inspection, from 01/08/2010 to 31/07/2011, Kilmarnock transferred 54 prisoners to Open Conditions. The table below compares that figure with transfers in from other establishments.

Transfers from Closed to Open Conditions 01/08/10 - 31/07/11
Establishment Total
Addiewell 37
Barlinnie 45
Edinburgh 98
Glenochil 89
Greenock 25
Kilmarnock 54
Perth 52
Shotts 47

Integrated Case Management

4.94 The Integrated Case Management (ICM) process in HMP Kilmarnock works very well. ICM operates at Standard and Enhanced levels although these are referred to locally as the Partial Route and the Full Route.

4.95 Prisoners are provided with relevant ICM information at the beginning of their sentence. Five trained ICM co-ordinators deliver awareness training to staff and information leaflets are widely available to prisoners throughout the establishment.

4.96 Discussion with prisoners and staff and a review of paper-based and electronic records demonstrate adherence to and compliance with the recognised guidelines. In particular, the review provided evidence in the following areas:

  • Consent forms, issued by the co-ordinators, are completed and recorded.
  • Core screens are completed by induction staff in the Links Centre within 72 hours of admission.
  • Referrals made are appropriate and are clearly recorded.
  • Risk assessments and related summary sheets are attached to the Community Integration Plan on PR2
  • Case conference minutes are attached to PR2
  • ICM meetings are scheduled every Tuesday and all parties are given advance notice.
  • Representation at case conferences is appropriate.
  • A minimum of two weeks notice of a case conference is given to the prisoner at which point dossier material is disclosed to him and his understanding is checked.
  • Minutes include information relating to progress and interventions.
  • Where appropriate, MAPPA supervision levels were recommended and referrals made.

4.97 The high standard of record keeping, accuracy and attention to detail in relation to the management of Integrated Case Management is an area of good practice.

4.98 During the inspection, an Integrated Case Management initial case conference was observed. In attendance were the case co-ordinator, the prisoner, his prison-based social worker, a prison-based psychologist, a member of the prison's addictions team and an administrator acting as minute-taker. The prisoner's community-based social worker participated via a video link.

4.99 The prisoner's parents were due to attend the conference but arrived late and, disappointingly, were not given the opportunity to take part. It is noted however that family attendance at case conferences in Kilmarnock is actively encouraged and is, on average, on a par with the SPS corporate target of 13%.

4.100 The subject of the case conference was a prisoner who, although having been in custody for over a year, was attending his first conference. This was as a direct result of him having attracted subsequent, consecutive sentences after his original conviction, bringing his eventual sentence to 4 years and two months.

4.101 The case coordinator took responsibility for managing the conference and ensured that the following areas were fully covered during the proceedings:-

  • Accommodation.
  • Debt.
  • Income.
  • Relationships and pro-social support.
  • Learning, skills and employability.
  • Substance misuse.
  • Racism.
  • Previous offending history.
  • Supervision level.
  • Disciplinary record.
  • Impulsivity and problem solving.
  • Violent conduct.
  • History of self harm.

4.102 Levels of need were discussed in relation to all of the above and the prisoner was encouraged to contribute throughout the case conference. At all stages, his views were taken account of and recorded.

4.103 The prisoner's personal officer was not present but the information contained in the narrative report was discussed. As with most of the narrative reports viewed during the inspection however, the information contained within was limited and could have been of a higher quality. This is in stark contrast to the standard of recording delivered by the ICM Team. It is recommended that additional training in report writing is considered for personal officers, and thereafter a quality assurance system put in place to ensure improved standards are maintained.

4.104 Generally, the case conference was well managed and the quality of the discussion was good with the prison based social worker and psychologist in particular providing information and explanation of a high standard.

Parole

4.105 There are, on average, around 250 prisoners in Kilmarnock eligible for parole. This is a significant workload for the relatively small risk management team. However, arrangements for prisoners to engage in the Parole system are good.

4.106 Through discussion with prisoners and staff and from examination of paper and electronic records, it is evident that the guidance is adhered to, the staff are trained to carry out the relevant stages within the process and the level and quality of information sharing and communication is more than adequate to support it.

4.107 Despite criticism of the quality of the general narratives, the staff reports contained within the parole dossiers examined were of a much better standard.

4.108 Recent changes to the Parole system have been complied with and amendments have been made accordingly.

4.109 The facilities for Tribunals are not ideal. The accommodation used is a small staff training facility which means that when Tribunals take place, activities scheduled for that area have to be postponed, relocated or cancelled. There is access to video conferencing facilities if required.

4.110 Written guidance is available for prisoners and both Lifer Liaison Officers work closely with those prisoners involved in the process to keep them informed. There was no evidence of the availability of any written information regarding Parole for prisoners or their families.

MAPPA

4.111 Examination of existing and historical data provided the Inspection Team with assurance that all aspects of the arrangements were being adhered to.

4.112 At the time of the Inspection there were nine prisoners in Kilmarnock who were subject to MAPPA.

4.113 The day-to-day responsibility for the management of MAPPA lies within the remit of the Head of Risk Management and all case co-ordinators working to the post holder are trained to complete SA07 assessments.

4.114 Identification of those who fall under the arrangements is carried out timeously and robust processes are in place for accurate notification and referral within the recognised timescales.

4.115 Clear links with Integrated Case Management assist in ensuring appropriate information is understood by and shared with the prisoner, the responsible authority, relevant local representatives, community based social work and appropriate partner organisations.

4.116 No short term sex offender programme is available in Kilmarnock, however if the prisoner has an identified need and is serving a sentence of at least nine months he can, if willing to engage, be transferred to HMP Barlinnie to take part in the relevant programmed activity.

4.117 Electronic records of some prisoners subject to the arrangements were examined and confirmed that all relevant entries were up to date and appropriate markers had been applied.

4.118 Information about the Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements was widely available throughout the establishment for prisoners, their families and visiting agencies.

5. GOOD PRACTICE

5.1 All night staff are first-aid trained (paragraph 2.14).

5.2 The Prisoner Supervision System Boards (paragraph 2.34).

5.3 The ongoing programme of cleaning and maintenance (paragraph 3.11).

5.4 The training kitchen (paragraph 3.31).

5.5 Remand prisoners can order their meal the day before (paragraph 3.33).

5.6 Catering staff visit the halls when meals are being served and record the temperature of the food at time of eating (paragraph 3.35).

5.7 Staff development training (paragraph 3.47).

5.8 The visits experience (paragraph 3.67).

5.9 The approach adopted by PE staff (paragraph 4.17).

5.10 The standard of pastoral care, the facilities in which prisoners can worship and the level of purposeful activity within the Multi-Faith Centre (paragraph 4.35).

5.11 The self-help and guided help workbooks for prisoners with low mood and depression, sleep problems and self-harm (paragraph 4.57).

5.12 The alcohol awareness courses carried out by the Addictions Team (paragraph 4.66).

5.13 The Smoking Cessation Services provided by NHS Ayrshire and Arran (paragraph 4.67).

5.14 The Family Strategy includes actions required, target dates and progress against each key area (paragraph 4.73).

4.15 The protocol for dealing with people who are on a Home Detention Curfew who just turn up at the gate to hand themselves in (paragraph 4.85).

5.16 The standard of record keeping, accuracy and attention to detail in relation to the management of Integrated Case Management (paragraph 4.97).

5.10 The alcohol awareness courses (paragraph 4.64).

5.11 The action plans contained in the Family Strategy (paragraph 4.71).

5.12 The protocol for dealing with people on Home Detention Curfews who turn up at the gate to hand themselves in (paragraph 4.83).

6. RECOMMENDATIONS

6.1 HRAT should be reviewed and the sharing of best practice should be further developed to ensure that prisoners transferring from public to private prisons, or vice versa, experience no difference in terms of standards of care or treatment (paragraph 2.19).

6.2 The number of prisoners attending production workshops and vocational training programmes should be increased (paragraph 4.19).

6.3 The number of prisoners attending education should be increased (paragraph 4.25).

6.4 A review of accommodation and associated facilities for programme delivery should be undertaken (paragraph 4.28).

6.5 Management should consider the introduction of a multi-disciplinary system for the management of prisoners deemed to be at risk of self-harm (paragraph 4.29).

6.6 Clinical treatment should stop immediately in the medical room in house block 1 (paragraph 4.52).

6.7 A system should be introduced immediately to ensure all prisoners on Methadone are tested regularly (paragraph 4.70).

6.8 A community based provider should confirm that a prisoner is on Methadone before it is commenced in the prisoner, and a support package should be in place before commencing a prisoner on Methadone (paragraph 4.71).

6.9 The SPS video and information package aimed at prisoners progressing to the Open estate should be made available to Kilmarnock (paragraph 4.92).

6.10 Additional training in report writing should be considered for personal officers, and thereafter a quality assurance system put in place to ensure improved standards are maintained (paragraph 4.103).

7. ACTION POINTS

7.1 Reception and discharge processes should be speeded up (paragraph 2.6).

7.2 The night information packs should be reviewed and staff made aware of their content (paragraph 2.13).

7.3 Prisoners should be reassessed for potential risks when circumstances have changed at Court (paragraph 2.18).

7.4 The decision to accommodate all level 1 and 2 HRAT prisoners in the in-patient facility in the Health Centre should be reviewed (paragraph 2.20).

7.5 Prisoners should not wash crockery and cutlery in the sinks in their cells (paragraph 3.8).

7.6 Recreation areas should be refurbished (paragraph 3.10).

7.7 Ways should be found to make recreation more purposeful (paragraph 3.10).

7.8 All protection prisoners should receive their full entitlement of one hour in the open air (paragraph 3.20).

7.9 The level of staffing and the location of staff supervising the exercise yards should be reviewed, and the numbers in and out should be checked (paragraph 3.22).

7.10 Staff should challenge disrespectful prisoner attitudes towards them (paragraph 3.38).

7.11 Compulsory vocational qualifications should be available to custodial staff (paragraph 3.45).

7.12 Relevant staff should receive child protection training (paragraph 3.48).

7.13 Wing Prisoner Custody Officers should be given Personal Officer training and support (paragraph 3.49).

7.14 Training Committee meetings should be reinvigorated (paragraph 3.50).

7.15 The right of appeal should be explained to newly sentenced prisoners on reception (paragraph 3.70).

7.16 Foreign nationals should be informed of their right to access consular officials (paragraph 3.74).

7.17 Prisoners should be offered a copy of the Prison Rules during disciplinary hearings (paragraph 3.76).

7.18 In disciplinary hearings which relate to possession of unauthorised articles, the evidence should always be produced (paragraph 3.77).

7.19 Steps should be taken to reduce the number of prisoners refusing to go to work (paragraph 3.79).

7.20 Prisoners should be routinely told that they can appeal against the result of a disciplinary hearing (paragraph 3.80).

7.21 Prisoners should have access to an interpreter if required (paragraph 3.83).

7.22 Prisoners' complaints should be audited on a regular basis and ICC cases should be shared with other senior managers (paragraph 3.84).

7.23 Translated materials should be available during induction (paragraph 4.7).

7.24 The oversight of the Incentives and Earned Privileges scheme should be reviewed (paragraph 4.9).

7.25 All teaching staff delivering education programmes should hold a teaching qualification (paragraph 4.12).

7.26 Learning opportunities should be effectively promoted across the prison (paragraph 4.15).

7.27 Health and safety requirements should be enforced at all times in production workshops (paragraph 4.21).

7.28 All prisoners attending production workshops should be engaged in meaningful work activities (paragraph 4.22).

7.29 A systematic quality assurance or development plan should be put in place to inform improvement planning in education (paragraph 4.24).

7.30 The education programme should be developed (paragraph 4.25).

7.31 More prisoners should obtain educational qualifications (paragraph 4.26).

7.32 More prisoners should attain vocational qualifications (paragraph 4.26).

7.33 The prison should hold more multi-cultural and voluntary activities (paragraph 4.34).

7.34 Health promotion materials should be on display in the Health Centre waiting rooms (paragraph 4.46).

7.35 The primary care nurses should receive additional training to enable them to be more effective in their role (paragraph 4.49).

7.36 Care plans should be used by Primary Care staff (paragraph 4.51).

7.37 The current process of booking Doctors appointments through the kiosks should be reviewed (paragraph 4.54).

7.38 The Multi-disciplinary Mental Health Team should meet every two weeks (paragraph 4.58).

7.39 Prisoners on remand should receive dental treatment if they are to be in custody long enough for treatment to be administered (paragraph 4.60).

7.40 The prison should look at ways of introducing a family induction session (paragraph 4.75).

ANNEX 1

Sources of Evidence

Written materials and statistics received from the prison prior to Inspection
Director's briefing
SPS Prisoner Survey
Prison Records
Prison background material
Discussions with prisoners
Discussions with prisoners' families
Focus groups with prisoners
Interviews with prisoners
Interviews with prison staff
Focus groups with staff
Observations

ANNEX 2

Inspection Team

Hugh Monro HM Chief Inspector
Margaret Brown Deputy Chief Inspector
David McAllister Assistant Chief Inspector
Mick Armstrong Inspector
John Carroll Associate Inspector
Adam Quin Associate Inspector
Lesley MacDowell Associate Healthcare Inspector
Stewart Maxwell Education Adviser
Andrew Brawley Education Adviser