Report on HMP Greenock Full Inspection 19-27 May 2014

Executive Summary

Overall this is a good report for HMP Greenock, which highlights areas of good practice and identifies where there is potential and opportunity for improvement. When the two new Community Integration Units are built and operational, there will be greater scope for the prison to work constructively with the prisoners to improve their preparation for return to the community.

The report contains 36 recommendations and 8 areas of good practice. The Inspectorate will continue to monitor the progress HMP Greenock makes in implementing its action plan in response to the recommendations. We look forward to seeing the areas of good practice taken up throughout prisons in Scotland.

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Contents

Letter

Introduction And Background

Key Facts

HMCIPS' Overview

Part 1: Safety

Part 2: Decency, humanity and respect for legal rights

Part 3: Opportunities for self-improvement and access to services and activities

Recommendations

Good Practice

Inspection Team

Acronyms

Letter

The Scottish Ministers

In accordance with my Terms of Reference as HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland, I present a report of the full inspection carried out at HMP Greenock between 19‑27 May 2014.

The report makes a number of recommendations. It also highlights areas of good practice.

DAVID STRANG

HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland

September 2014

Introduction And Background

HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland (HMCIPS) assesses the quality of prisons in Scotland against a set of Standards. These Standards are set out in the document "Standards Used in the Inspection of Prisons in Scotland" which can be found at www.hmips.gov.uk.

The Standards reflect the independence of the inspection of prisons in Scotland and are designed to provide information to prisoners, prison staff and the wider community on the main areas that are examined during the course of an inspection.

The Standards provide assurance to Ministers and the public that inspections are conducted in line with a framework that is consistent and that assessments are made against appropriate criteria.

While the basis for these Standards is rooted in international human rights treaties and conventions and in prison rules, they are the Standards of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Prisons for Scotland (HMIPS).

This report reflects the Standards and has three main sections:

1. Safety: security, good order, protection of prisoners from harm;

2. Decency, humanity and respect for legal rights: all aspects of the treatment of prisoners and the framework of rights within which imprisonment should operate; and

3. Opportunities for self-improvement and access to services and activities: the activities provided by the prison, the ethos, measures taken to solve the problems that led the prisoner into crime, preparation for release and social reintegration.

HMIPS gathers together information to enable assessments to be arrived at. A number of different techniques are used to do this. These techniques include:

  • obtaining information and documents from the Scottish Prison Service (SPS) and the prison being inspected;
  • shadowing and observing Prison Service and other specialist staff as they perform their duties within the prison;
  • interviewing prisoners and staff on a one‑to‑one basis;
  • conducting focus groups with prisoners and staff;
  • observing prison services as they are delivered;
  • inspecting facilities;
  • attending and observing relevant meetings; and
  • reviewing policies, procedures and other documents including performance reports.

HMIPS is supported in our work by inspectors from Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS), Education Scotland and the Care Inspectorate.

The information that we gather enables us to obtain a full picture of the prison. This enables us to ensure that our assessments are fair, balanced and accurate.

This report outlines where Standards are being met and where they are not. It identifies where improvements are required. Where improvements are needed, the report makes appropriate recommendations. The report also highlights areas of the establishment which are to be commended and are listed as good practice.

Key Facts

Location

Her Majesty's Prison Greenock is situated close to the main A78 on the Old Inverkip Road in Greenock.

Role

HMP Greenock serves designated courts in the West of Scotland by holding remand and short‑term convicted adult, male prisoners. It provides a national facility for selected long‑term and Life sentenced prisoners, affording them the opportunity for progression towards open conditions and release.

The establishment also holds selected remand, short‑term and long‑term convicted female adult prisoners on transfer from other prisons who hold female offenders.

Design Capacity/Population held at time of Inspection

The prison's design capacity is 249 and at the time of the inspection held 242 of which 16 were untried prisoners and nine were convicted awaiting sentence. The remaining convicted population comprised 135 serving less than four years, 13 serving between four and 10 years, one serving over 10 years and 68 sentenced to Life imprisonment.

Brief History

HMP Greenock was built between 1907 and 1910, taking its first prisoners on 28 August 1910. Originally built as two residential facilities, Ailsa Hall and Darroch Hall, with a third building, Chrisswell House, having been built in the 1990s.

Date of last inspection

May 2009

Accommodation

Accommodation comprises three main residential areas:

Ailsa Hall has 132 single occupancy cells including one accessible cell. In addition, it provides two safer cells. This Hall provides cellular accommodation for the local male population including both remand prisoners and those convicted prisoners serving short‑term sentences.

Darroch Hall has 53 single occupancy cells, one of which is an accessible cell. In addition it has one safer cell. This Hall provides cellular accommodation for female prisoners on remand and for convicted female prisoners irrespective of sentence length.

Chrisswell House comprises 64 single occupancy cells, one of which is suitable for a prisoner with restricted physical ability. This House provides a National Top-End facility for those long‑term, adult, male prisoners who require low levels of supervision and who are preparing for progression to open conditions.

There are also four Separate Cells located adjacent to Ailsa Hall.

Healthcare Provider

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

Learning Provider

New College Lanarkshire

HM Chief Inspector's Overview

Setting the Scene

HMP Greenock is one of a diminishing number of prisons in Scotland which were built over a hundred years ago. The age and fabric of the prison adds an additional challenge to the running of the prison and the care of the prisoners. At the time of this full inspection in May 2014, there were under construction two Community Integration Unit buildings within the prison walls, with up to 50 contractors working on site. HMP Greenock coped well with this additional complexity and managed to maintain a well-run prison in the circumstances.

HMP Greenock was last subject to a full inspection by HM Inspectorate of Prisons for Scotland in 2009. For this year's full inspection, the team was assisted by inspectors from Education Scotland, Healthcare Improvement Scotland and, for the first time, the Care Inspectorate. I am very grateful for their invaluable contribution to the inspection process.

Inspection of HMP Greenock

HMP Greenock is a local prison, largely serving the courts in the West of Scotland. At the time of the inspection there were approximately 240 prisoners in a prison with a design capacity of 249. All cells designed for one are now used for single occupancy only, which is a considerable improvement on the previous use of bunk beds.

Within the last year a new Governor-in-Charge has been appointed, who was the previous Deputy Governor. This continuity has been helpful in allowing stability of leadership and direction for the prison. It was clear to me that there are positive relationships between the staff and prisoners; and also between HMP Greenock and the local community. We observed many respectful interactions, and prisoners reported to us that they generally felt safe in the prison.

There is considerable emphasis on the role the prison can play in the preparation for release of those returning to the community. I was particularly interested to see the Throughcare Support Officers (TSOs) pilot and the level of community placements. There is an impressive range of community partners working in and with the prison to assist prisoners in achieving better outcomes.

In terms of conditions, the basic furnishings and clothing provided are of an adequate standard. One problem resulting from the age of the buildings is the persistent dampness through the walls of Ailsa Hall and some other locations. The condition of the separate cells - although infrequently used - is poor. The food is of a high standard and the quality of the laundry service is good.

There is a good range of healthcare services available for both men and women. This includes a number of clinics with an emphasis on prevention. Vulnerable prisoners are cared for well under ACT 2 Care. As in other establishments we have inspected, we had concerns about the transfer of medical records from other prisons, confidentiality of medical records, and the failure to communicate to officers and NHS staff information on risk and vulnerability from the Prisoner Escort Record (PER) form of prisoners arriving in Reception.

There is a good range of activities and learning opportunities through the work parties and vocational training. The achievement of qualifications has been quite limited and it was disappointing to find sessions cancelled because of staff absences. In the Learning Centre we saw evidence of good partnership working by the SPS and College staff. There was good provision of gymnasium activities, including in the evenings and at the weekends. The library provision is poor and in need of review. There is scope for a greater level of involvement of prisoners in decisions about aspects of life in the prison.

Personal Officers take responsibility for the Integrated Case Management (ICM) arrangements, which enhances their engagement with prisoners. There are good pre-release links with outside organisations including Local Authorities. The Interventions programmes are particularly focused on desistance and prevention; there is scope to improve the analysis of aggregated needs in the prison. The work placements for those in the National Top-End provided opportunities for constructive preparation for progression towards liberation.

I was impressed with the number of excellent links with the community and the breadth of support for prisoners provided by local organisations. Some good examples are included in Part 3 of this report. I commend the dedication and commitment of the officers involved in the Throughcare Support pilot and the good links they had built with the community. While admiring their energy and drive, I had some concerns about the level of their training and professional supervision. I would like to see the evaluation of this and other Throughcare pilots, leading to a clear and consistent policy and practice throughout Scotland.

A great deal of effort is invested in supporting important links with family members of those in the prison. There is good support for families provided by the Family Contact Officers. Family members are invited to attend the Family Induction process. The processes and facilities for visits are positive and encourage the maintenance of constructive family ties.

Summary

Overall this is a good report for HMP Greenock, which highlights areas of good practice and identifies where there is potential and opportunity for improvement. When the two new Community Integration Units are built and operational, there will be greater scope for the prison to work constructively with the prisoners to improve their preparation for return to the community.

The report contains 36 recommendations and 8 areas of good practice. The Inspectorate will continue to monitor the progress HMP Greenock makes in implementing its action plan in response to the recommendations. We look forward to seeing the areas of good practice taken up throughout prisons in Scotland.

David Strang

HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland

Part 1: Safety

OUTCOME 1

Appropriate steps are taken to ensure that individual prisoners are protected from harm by themselves and others.

Overview

Health screening on admission to HMP Greenock is good with prisoners presenting with problems related to excessive alcohol intake being referred to a specialist alcohol liaison nurse employed within the prison. Urine samples taken for the purpose of drug screening require to be properly supervised. Access to a medical assessment by a doctor on Saturdays for those prisoners admitted directly from court is a concern.

Body searches were carried out appropriately however prisoners' injuries noted during the admission process should be recorded and investigated.

Prisoner Escort Record (PER) forms were not passed to relevant functions within the prison thus increasing the risk that important information is not available to those who need to know.

Plans are in place to deal with emergency situations, however call-out lists were found not to be up to date and HMP Greenock should make sure that there is sufficient First Aid cover available and deployed during patrol and Night Duty periods.

An appropriate gender balance to deal with emergency situations involving female prisoners should be in place to ensure that they can be managed safely.

At the time of inspection no prisoners were subject to the ACT 2 Care Strategy however, a review of historical documentation confirmed prisoners were managed appropriately.

Use of force is low and relationships between staff and prisoners are good throughout the prison.

Few prisoners were aware of the SPS Anti-Bullying Strategy (ABS).

Searching arrangements for female and National Top-End (NTE) prisoners should be reviewed.

STANDARD 1

Prisoners are safe at all times; while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.

1.1 The Reception in HMP Greenock is a fit‑for‑purpose building which has sufficient prisoner interview and holding rooms to deal with the volume and differing type of prisoner admissions and transfers in and out of the prison.

1.2 All prisoners admitted to HMP Greenock from court, or transferred in from another prison, meet with a nurse who provides them with an initial health screening. This includes asking the prisoner about any previous drug or alcohol use. Where health or addiction issues are identified, the prisoner is referred to specialist staff within the Healthcare Team for further action.

1.3 An alcohol liaison nurse is employed within the Healthcare Team. As part of the admission process an additional screening is undertaken to identify those prisoners who have specific problems with excessive alcohol intake and, where appropriate, refer them to the alcohol liaison service for further input. This is an area of good practice.

1.4 When a prisoner is identified as having an issue with substance misuse, a urinalysis is undertaken for drug screening purposes. However, Inspectors noted that prisoners were not always observed when providing the urine sample.

Recommendation 1: HMP Greenock should ensure that prisoners are supervised when providing a urine sample for the purposes of drug screening.

1.5 Prisoners admitted directly from court to HMP Greenock are normally given a medical assessment by a doctor as soon as possible. However, due to staffing issues within NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde it has not been possible of late to ensure that a doctor is available on a Saturday to assess those prisoners admitted on the previous day.

Recommendation 2: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that all prisoners are medically assessed by a doctor within 24 hours of having been admitted from court.

1.6 Healthcare staff confirmed that medical records and current prescriptions do not always accompany prisoners transferred‑in from other establishments. This was highlighted during the inspection when three prisoners transferring from HMP & YOI Cornton Vale arrived without their relevant healthcare records. This results in staff having to spend time liaising with other establishments in order to obtain the relevant information. This is a weakness.

1.7 When prisoners are transferred out of HMP Greenock to other establishments, healthcare staff ensure that a transfer letter and the prisoners' medical records and prescriptions accompany them. This transfer letter details all on‑going health problems, current treatments and outstanding appointments. This is an area of good practice.

1.8 All prisoners are body searched on arrival by Officers of the same gender in Reception. A number of these searches were observed and in the majority of cases were undertaken in a thorough manner with Officers visually checking prisoners for injuries. However, during one search a prisoner presenting with recent cuts to his arm was not asked to explain his injury nor was his injury recorded or the information passed on to the healthcare staff. This is a weakness. It should be noted that these injuries were observed by the nurse in Reception and discussed with the prisoner during the clinical part of the admission process.

Recommendation 3: HMP Greenock should ensure that all injuries noted during the admission process are recorded and the prisoner asked to explain how the injuries occurred.

1.9 During observation a warrant or relevant legislative paperwork accompanied all admissions and transfers. This paperwork was checked and validated by an Officer who confirmed the prisoner's index offence and assessed if the prisoner required protection from others.

1.10 A Prisoner Escort Record (PER) form accompanied all arriving prisoners. The form records details about the prisoner including the requirement for protection from others, medical information and issues relating to self‑harming behaviours. These forms were checked by the Officer during the admission interview and any information deemed pertinent was noted on the ACT 2 Care documentation which was then passed to the nurse undertaking the clinical assessment. However, in common with other establishments previously inspected, the PER form was not passed to the nurse undertaking the clinical assessment which will result in important information being missed. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 4: HMP Greenock should ensure Prisoner Escort Record forms are passed to relevant function within the prison.

1.11 During observation in Reception, staff were contacted by a court official who gave them advanced notice of a prisoner admission. As this individual had previously been in custody, the Officer and nurse were then able to access the prisoner's electronic record (PR2) to establish any previously identified risks or conditions including those of self‑harm. In this instance, records indicated that the prisoner had previously required protection and this was discussed with the prisoner during the admission interview. The Officer confirmed that when the prison is given notice by the Courts of forthcoming admissions, staff in reception and nurses would undertake these pre‑admission checks. This is positive.

1.12 There are signs in Reception for those prisoners whose first language is not English to identify their chosen language. HMP Greenock has a contract with a translation service which is used on admission, if required, to obtain information about the prisoner and inform them of what will happen to them. In the first instance this will be done via the telephone; however a face‑to‑face meeting can be arranged.

1.13 Prisoners admitted to Ailsa and Darroch Halls complete a First Night Admission Checklist, which covers the following information:

  • Summoning assistance (Cell Call System)
  • Immediate welfare requirements
  • Unlock procedure and daily routine
  • Reporting sick
  • Prisoner Listener Scheme
  • Potential vulnerability
  • Discipline process
  • Fire procedures
  • Literacy issues

1.14 On completion, the checklist is signed by both the prisoner and Officer to confirm the content has been explained to them. In addition, these prisoners are provided with written information about the regime and a basic explanation of what will happen to them, however the written information is only available in English. National Top-End prisoners transferred‑in to Chrisswell House do not complete the First Night Admission Checklist, however they are given a basic explanation of the prison routines and provided with a booklet detailing pertinent information. Once again, this written information is only available in English. This is a weakness.

1.15 Prisoners transferred to Ailsa Hall from another prison are verbally advised of information contained in the First Night Admission Checklist, however unlike the process followed for admissions, no record is kept to confirm this. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 5: HMP Greenock should ensure that basic information about what will happen to them and the routines of the prison is given to prisoners on admission in a language they can understand.

1.16 All admissions have 30 pence credited to their telephone account. Prisoners who transfer‑in to HMP Greenock from another establishment are able to access their telephone credit immediately or, if this is not possible, are afforded the opportunity to make a telephone call at the expense of the establishment.

1.17 On arrival, prisoners may make an initial call from the telephone in Reception or in their allocated residential accommodation. Prisoners spoken with confirmed they did not experience any issues with making a telephone call on admission or transfer‑in to HMP Greenock.

1.18 Officers check the warrants, relevant legislative paperwork and PER forms of all admissions and those returning from court for any information that indicates the prisoner may require protection from others. Where this is identified, Reception Officers discuss this matter with the prisoner. Similarly, the relevant paperwork is checked to confirm if the prisoner has received a long‑term sentence and/or is in prison for the first time. In such circumstances, the Officer then discusses any related issues with the prisoner during the admission interview. In addition, the nurse also checks the prisoner's sentence length, whether they have been in prison before and if the prisoner has any issues the nurse should be aware of.

1.19 On admission to HMP Greenock male prisoners who require protection from others due to their index offence, or for any other reason, are located in the First Night Centre (FNC) on the bottom level of Ailsa Hall where they remain until a transfer to another establishment is arranged. Currently, their daily routine is limited to accessing time in the open air and sporadic access to association with other protection prisoners. Due to this limited regime and the difficulties often encountered by HMP Greenock in transferring protection prisoners to an appropriate establishment, work is underway to convert some dormitory accommodation into a recreation area and a dining facility in order that these prisoners have access to a better quality regime whilst in HMP Greenock. This is a positive.

1.20 All prisoners are held in normal association within Chrisswell House with no special arrangements or facilities provided for those who would normally attract protection status in other prisons. Both staff and prisoners spoken with during the inspection felt that these arrangements worked well. There is, however, historical information relating to sex offenders in Chrisswell House being verbally abused by other prisoners from the same accommodation. During observation of Chrisswell House prisoners in the cafeteria, a group of mainstream prisoners were clearly making derogatory comments to a number of sex offenders seated together at a nearby table. This behaviour was not challenged by staff nor recorded.

Recommendation 6: HMP Greenock should ensure that prisoners in Chrisswell House are not subjected to any form of abuse from other prisoners.

1.21 Similarly, there are no special arrangements for female prisoners in Darroch Hall who may attract protection status. This situation mirrors the remainder of the female estate. Both staff and prisoners spoken with during the inspection reported that these arrangements worked well.

1.22 Prisoners who present in Reception as vulnerable or demonstrating behaviour associated with having a mental illness are asked about their vulnerability and mental health during the ACT 2 Care interview with all relevant information observed or divulged by the prisoner recorded on the appropriate paperwork and then passed on to the nurse undertaking the clinical admission assessment.

1.23 Where a prisoner is assessed as being at imminent risk of self‑harm or suicide they are located in an anti‑ligature cell in Ailsa Hall or a safer cell in Darroch Hall. Prisoners who are identified as having a mental illness are referred for follow‑up by the mental health nurse.

1.24 The Reception is well‑designed with a number of lockable prisoner holding rooms to allow vulnerable prisoners to be separated and held safely from others, however during observation they were regularly left unlocked. This is a weakness.

1.25 Prisoners who require detoxification or symptomatic relief as a result of substance or alcohol misuse are able to access this within 24 hours of admission.

1.26 Establishment Contingency Plans have recently been updated to reflect new nationally agreed standards and there are copies in the Head of Operations' Office, the Electronic Control Room (ECR) and on SharePoint, an electronic file management system located within the Scottish Prison Information Network (SPIN).

1.27 All areas have Night Duty Orders which are comprehensive, although contain some information which is out‑of‑date. The Night Duty staff spoken with were able to advise on the action they would take in the event of an emergency situation arising. Inspectors noted that in the event of an emergency, the Night Duty First Line Manager (FLM) is required to access sealed packs across a number of locations in order to respond and provide assistance. Management in the prison are aware of this situation and advised that they are actively engaged with SPS Headquarters in reaching a resolution.

1.28 Two sets of Establishment Call‑Out Lists to be initiated in cases of emergency are located in the Gate; one current and one of which was out‑of‑date and contained contact information relating to past Governors and Senior Management Teams. Staff were unable to identify the proper list. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 7: HMP Greenock should ensure that documentation and guidance for use in emergency situations is up‑to‑date.

1.29 The Night Duty FLM reports that there is no process in place to ensure sufficient numbers of female staff are allocated to Night Duty posts which have previously caused concern in the management of emergency situations involving female prisoners. For example, in cases where a female prisoner required to be hospitalised after an episode of self‑harm and there were insufficient female staff available to conduct the required searching procedures. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 8: HMP Greenock should ensure that there is an appropriate gender balance allotted to every shift in order to manage emergency situations involving female prisoners.

1.30 Three Local Incident Management (LIM) training weeks have taken place in the establishment over the previous 18 months with a fourth scheduled to take place in September 2014. This training has included multi‑agency working with Police Scotland and Fire and Rescue Service colleagues.

1.31 Records inspected confirmed that 19 staff are currently trained to the appropriate level of competence in relation to First Aid. A board located at the Gate area records when and where First Aiders are on duty all times except during night duties and patrol periods.

1.32 During a Night Duty visit, the FLM was unable to advise which, if any, of the staff on duty were first aid trained. After discussions with all staff on duty, two staff (one in the ECR and one in Darroch Hall) were identified as having the required level of competence.

Recommendation 9: HMP Greenock should ensure that sufficient First Aid cover is available and appropriately deployed during patrol and Night Duty periods.

1.33 In the event of a fire, prisoners located in Chrisswell House will self‑evacuate and there is evidence of regular drills taking place to ensure that all prisoners are aware of how to respond in the event of an emergency evacuation. Records also indicate that regular drills are conducted with the local Fire and Rescue Service and that there are procedures in place for supporting those prisoners with a disability in evacuating to a designated place of safety. All residential accommodation areas have clear signage displayed advising what action to take in an emergency situation. From training records provided at the time of inspection, 85% of staff were assessed as competent in Fire Awareness Training.

1.34 The cell call systems within Ailsa Hall, Darroch Hall and the Separate Cells do not have the facility to record usage or staff response times.

1.35 Ailsa and Darroch Hall prisoners spoken with during the inspection stated cell calls were answered timeously during periods of unlock, however during patrol and night‑duty periods cell calls may remain unanswered for lengthy periods of time. Observation of staff response times to cell call activations in Ailsa and Darroch Halls during periods of unlock confirmed that they are answered within acceptable timescales. During observation of a night‑duty period cell call use was very low, and Officers spoken with reported that this is not uncommon and that cell calls are answered timeously during these periods.

1.36 The cell call system in Chrisswell House is not used as prisoners are not routinely locked in their cells during periods of unlock, meaning they can speak to Officers at any time. Similarly, throughout patrol and night‑duty periods, prisoners are not locked within their cells during which time they have access to a dedicated telephone connecting them directly with staff in the ECR. Staff and prisoners in Chrisswell House spoken with during the inspection confirmed there are no issues in summoning staff assistance if required.

1.37 Each cell door in Ailsa Hall, Darroch Hall and the Separate cells have a fit‑for‑purpose observation panel fitted allowing Officers good levels of observation into the cells. Of those checked, all were found to be clear of any obstruction. Cell doors in Chrisswell House also have fit‑for‑purpose observation panels, all of which have been locked in the closed position and do not allow for any observation into the cells. As cell doors within this location are left unlocked at all times and staff carry a key to open the observation panel, this situation does not pose any problems.

1.38 There is a published rota for senior managers to make a monthly visit to the establishment during night‑duty periods. Staff spoken with reported that these visits do take place, however entries in the occurrence book held in the Gate do not support this and unlike most other establishments, Duty Managers do not make a record of their visits. This is a weakness.

1.39 Notices and leaflets are on display and available to prisoners' families and friends which provide the contact details of key prison staff who are able to offer help, support and signposting should they need to share information or raise concerns about the vulnerability of the prisoner with the prison authorities. These contact details include the relevant named individual members of staff, telephone numbers and email addresses. Family Contact Officers (FCOs) are also on duty during visiting sessions and face‑to‑face contact between them and family members is easily facilitated on request in confidential surroundings. During the inspection the ACT 2 Care co‑ordinator reported that very few prisoners want their families to take part in case‑conferences or other parts of the process.

1.40 As there were no prisoners managed through the ACT 2 Care strategy during the time of the inspection, inspectors were unable to observe any case conferences. A review of historical documentation however confirmed prisoners managed under the ACT 2 Care strategy were subject to regular case conferences attended by all the required functions at which appropriate decisions were taken in relation to the prisoner's management and care.

1.41 There are two safer cells in Ailsa Hall and one in Darroch Hall. There were no prisoners using these facilities during the inspection. The cells are very basic and provide minimal stimulation or comfort for prisoners who use them. Staff were able to report that these cells are used sparingly and for the least amount of time possible. They were occupied on 84 occasions in the period 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014. Darroch Hall staff were able to describe how prisoners using the safer cell are supported in their reintegration with other prisoners and how they are able to access items, including a television, in their cell based on an assessment of the risk posed. This is positive.

1.42 Prisoners who are at risk of harming themselves have access to a mental health nurse and a consultant psychiatrist as required.

1.43 There is a limited number of prisoner listeners located in Darroch Hall and Chrisswell House. At the time of the inspection, none were located in Ailsa Hall, however seven prisoners from this area have been identified to be trained as soon as the local Samaritans can facilitate the training. Female prisoner listeners cover Darroch Hall and, at present, listeners from Chrisswell House cover the remainder of the prison.

1.44 Prisoners who are receiving specialised care from the mental health nurse are given the opportunity and encouraged to attend a dedicated PT session. This is positive.

1.45 Healthcare staff use the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde infection control manual to inform their practice, supplemented by information contained within the SPS infection control manual. The two clinical rooms and the dental suite in the healthcare centre have undergone significant upgrading to ensure compliance with current infection control standards. An infection control nurse provides regular input into the prison and is involved in staff training and undertaking regular audits. This is positive.

1.46 All prisoners who have an identified substance misuse problem have the opportunity to attend harm reduction programmes. Naloxone training is available within the prison with Naloxone packs provided to those prisoners who have completed the training.

STANDARD 2

Force is only used as a last resort and then strictly according to law and procedures.

2.1 Training records inspected show 93% of staff have undertaken and are competent in Control & Restraint (C&R) Phase 1 and the prison is in a position to meet their agreed national commitment for Operational Support Teams. This is positive. However, there is no formal system in place locally to identify these staff members, their attendance or location within the prison should they be required to respond to a local or national emergency situation. This is a weakness.

2.2 FLMs report that plasti-cuffs have been used during the removal of a prisoner, however records examined could not confirm this. This is a weakness.

2.3 There are no records to suggest that mechanical restraints have been used recently in HMP Greenock.

2.4 A copy of the Standard Operating Procedure in relation to Planned Removal/Video protocol is available, however FLMs reported that planned removals are not recorded as staff have not been trained in the use of the video equipment.

Recommendation 10: HMP Greenock should ensure that all planned removals are video recorded.

2.5 Between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2014 there were 45 recorded C&R removals. Examination of these records, held in the Intelligence Management Unit (IMU), show that the documentation is not routinely signed by the Head of Operations as part of the assurance process.

Recommendation 11: HMP Greenock should ensure that all Control and Restraint removal documentation is fully completed.

2.6 There were no current or recent prisoner complaints of the illegitimate use of force by prison staff in HMP Greenock.

STANDARD 3

Prisoners are protected from violence and harm by other prisoners.

3.1 Records show that between January and December 2013, 35 violent incidents were recorded in HMP Greenock:

  • 9 staff assaults
  • 15 prisoner assaults
  • 11 prisoner fights

3.2 Investigations revealed that the majority of the assaults were carried out by short‑term prisoners. In response, the prison has produced a plan which identifies a series of short, medium and long‑term solutions to tackle violence. This includes the introduction of measures such as a robust investigation taking place after any violent incident with FLMs on duty collating all the relevant intelligence and presenting it to the Duty Manager for action.

3.3 In addition, HMP Greenock has prepared a draft Anti‑Violence Policy which, at the time of the inspection, was issued to FLMs for comment prior to its implementation.

3.4 The IMU FLM co‑ordinates a robust system of physical and dynamic security measures in order to combat violence. A list of prisoners who must remain separate and a list of prisoners and their known enemies within the establishment are available for all staff to see on SharePoint.

3.5 Prisoners from Chrisswell House who attend Community Placements are randomly and infrequently subject to body searches in Reception on leaving and returning to the prison. Female prisoners from Darroch Hall are not subject to body searches in Reception prior to leaving the prison for external appointments.

Recommendation 12: HMP Greenock should review their searching arrangements for female and National Top End prisoners.

3.6 The use of CCTV is managed appropriately and in accordance with legislation with clear written authority given when CCTV footage is reviewed or downloaded.

3.7 Well‑established working relationships with the local police and the prison's Police Liaison Officer (PLO) allows the establishment to put in place reactive and passive security measures to combat violence.

3.8 During the period of the inspection and through discussions with staff and prisoners, it was noted that, in general, staff were properly deployed in order to maintain good order and prevent violence occurring. However, there were a few instances when posts went uncovered due largely to short‑term sickness absence. While the majority of staff appeared vigilant and aware of the individuals with a history of violence who required closer supervision, inspectors noted that on one occasion, prisoners' unacceptable behaviour towards each other went unnoticed due to their poor deployment within the area concerned.

3.9 During the admission interview Officers in Reception encourage prisoners to highlight any issues they have in relation to their personal safety. This is positive.

3.10 Relationships between staff and prisoners observed are positive and throughout the inspection staff and prisoners interacted freely and in a relaxed manner. Staff and prisoners who attended focus groups stated that relationships were positive and that prisoners would speak to staff if they had any issues in relation to their personal safety.

3.11 During the inspection there were no prisoners subject to the SPS Anti‑Bullying Strategy (ABS). Prisoners who attended focus groups reported that instances of bullying are unusual in HMP Greenock, however did accept that they did occasionally occur. They further stated that when staff are aware of bullying behaviour, either the bully or the victim is transferred out of the establishment if the behaviours cannot be addressed. In instances where staff are unaware of bullying, prisoners reported that they are likely to deal with the problem themselves. Those prisoners spoken with were unaware of the existence the ABS. This is a weakness.

3.12 As the establishment has now moved to single cell accommodation prisoners are no longer required to share cells, however staff in both Ailsa and Darroch Halls were able to evidence the process followed in order to carry out the Cell Sharing Risk Assessment (CSRA) process. A comprehensive recorded CSRA for each individual located within HMP Greenock is in place.

3.13 A daily compliance check takes place in order to ensure that all CSRAs are completed accurately and that any required action is progressed by the responsible FLM.

3.14 The system of food preparation and distribution within HMP Greenock ensures that food for vulnerable prisoner groups is not tampered with. All food is prepared in the main kitchen and transferred to serveries in both the central Cafeteria and in the dining room. During food preparation prisoners working in the kitchen are unaware of what food is destined for which serveries thus removing the opportunity to identify if it is destined for a vulnerable prisoner group. Staff closely supervise the loading of food into the serveries and the distribution to prisoners.

STANDARD 4

Security levels for individuals are no higher than is necessary to meet the risk presented by the prisoner.

4.1 The SPS Prisoner Supervision System (PSS) is managed well and applied to all prisoners in HMP Greenock.

4.2 Information relating to risk factors is shared with all relevant parties both internal to SPS and with external partners. This is evidenced well during the Risk Management Team (RMT) process where all information relating to risk factors is taken into consideration before decisions are made.

4.3 A number of PSS forms were checked and the decisions on the prisoners' security levels were in line with the risk factors and information available.

4.4 HMP Greenock has a good process in place to ensure PSS levels are reviewed within recognised timescales. FLMs, on receipt of a weekly report identifying those prisoners whose PSS levels are due for review, commence the relevant paperwork which is then completed by the Personal Officer. A weekly report is generated to highlight PSS reviews which are overdue. Inspectors checked this report at the time of the inspection and found that no PSS reviews were outstanding. In addition to this any prisoner who is found guilty of a breach of Prison Rules has their PSS level reviewed.

STANDARD 5

Procedures for deciding security levels are as transparent as is compatible with the sensitivities of the decision.

5.1 Prisoners knowledge of the PSS process and their own allocated level of supervision is variable and appears dependent on their location. Prisoners in Ailsa Hall appeared to be less aware of their PSS levels than those in Darroch Hall. National Top‑End prisoners in Chrisswell House have a good understanding of the PSS process and are aware of their allocated supervision levels and their review dates.

5.2 A random selection of PSS reviews examined documented the rationale for the decisions made and the supervision levels allocated. This information is made available to prisoners in order that they can submit self‑representations if they wish.

5.3 In some of the PSS forms checked, early reviews had taken place in response to prisoners reaching previously set goals including remaining report‑free or providing negative drug tests.

Part 2: Decency, Humanity And Respect For Legal Rights

OUTCOME 2

Prisoners are treated with respect for their dignity while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.

STANDARD 6

The standards that apply to the treatment of prisoners in prison extend to all other places where they are held.

6.1 This inspection examined HMP Greenock. It did not examine other locations where prisoners are held out with HMP Greenock, for example, while under escort in transit vehicles on journeys to and from court or while detained in courts or in legalised police cells.

6.2 Separate inspections on these locations have been carried out and have been published and are available on the HMIPS website at www.scotland.gov.uk/hmip.

OUTCOME 3

Prisoners are held in conditions that provide the basic necessities of life and health, including adequate air, light, water, exercise in the fresh air, food, bedding and clothing.

Overview

HMCIPS is pleased to find that the prison has recently moved to providing only single-cell occupancy.

While much of the prison is old, high levels of cleanliness are maintained. Concern however is noted in relation to the levels of dampness occurring in both exterior and interior walls in Ailsa Hall accommodation.

Lockable storage in Ailsa Hall and Chrisswell House should be provided.

Access to in-cell lighting within much of the residential living accommodation is poor.

The separate cells are very basic and should be upgraded however it is noted that they are seldom used.

Access to personal clothing for prisoners in HMP Greenock is good and laundry arrangements are robust. Not all prisoners have access to showers at weekends or sufficient access to clean towels.

In-cell lavatories in Ailsa and Darroch Halls do not provide sufficient privacy.

The quality of meals provided throughout the prison is good however the time between the evening meal on Saturday and the first meal of the day on Sunday is excessive.

STANDARD 7

The accommodation is clean and provides a reasonable amount of space for each prisoner, with space for personal belongings, ventilation, a reasonable temperature, natural light.

Ailsa Hall

7.1 Ailsa Hall is built over four levels connected by an open stairwell and comprises 132 single-occupancy cells including one accessible cell. Ailsa Hall also has two safer cells.

7.2 Until recently all single occupancy cells had a bunk bed fitted, however prior to the inspection these were removed which now ensures that all cells in Ailsa Hall can now hold only one prisoner. This is positive.

7.3 The external wall on the west side of Ailsa Hall suffers from dampness which has penetrated interior walls in a number of cells. A number of prisoners complained of this during the inspection. The Estates Team in HMP Greenock are aware of this on‑going situation and attempt to minimise its effects by plastering and painting the areas affected as it occurs. This reactive maintenance programme, while minimising the effects, does not however eradicate the problem.

Recommendation 13: HMP Greenock should review their response to the effects of dampness in areas of the prison.

7.4 All cells are equipped with a chair and worktop area and provide sufficient room for prisoners to move around in. However, a great deal of the cell furniture is in poor condition and should be replaced. Cellular accommodation in Ailsa Hall lacks facilities to store and hang clothing. This has resulted in prisoners fitting makeshift items such as hangers and shelves.

7.5 All cells are fitted with small lockable combination safes for the storage of personal items or medication, however the majority of prisoners do not use these safes as they do not know the combination or, in many cases, are unaware of how to access the combination. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 14: HMP Greenock should ensure all prisoners in Ailsa Hall are issued with the combination for their in‑cell safes.

7.6 Prisoners generally do not display posters or photographs out with the designated areas within each cell.

7.7 In‑cell lighting is controlled, by staff, from outside the cells. At night, cell lights are normally switched off at 22:00 or may be left on until midnight at the prisoner's request, after which the only in‑cell light source comes from prisoners' televisions or small bedside lamps. Unless removed as a punishment, all prisoners have a television however bedside lamps are only provided if prisoners choose to purchase them from the prison canteen using their personal cash. Many of the prisoners in Ailsa Hall have not bought their own bedside lamp and as such are dependent on the light from their television to see when accessing the toilet during the hours of darkness. This situation poses a risk.

Recommendation 15: HMP Greenock should provide prisoners with an appropriate light source to enable them to see and move around safely in their cells during the hours of darkness.

7.8 All windows provide sufficient ventilation and are fitted with curtains to control the degree of natural light entering the cells.

7.9 Cells in Ailsa Hall are generally clean and prisoners are provided with fit‑for‑purpose cleaning materials and are given the opportunity to clean their cells regularly.

Darroch Hall

7.10 Darroch Hall is built over two levels connected by an open stairwell and comprises 53 single occupancy cells, one of which is an accessible cell. Darroch Hall also has one safer cell.

7.11 Until recently all single occupancy cells had a bunk bed fitted, however prior to the inspection these were removed which now ensures that all cells in Darroch Hall can now hold only one prisoner. This is positive.

7.12 All cells are equipped with a chair and worktop area and provide sufficient room for prisoners to move around in. Most of the cell furniture is in decent condition, however they lack facilities to store and hang clothing. This has resulted in prisoners fitting makeshift items such as hangers and shelves. This problem is not confined to HMP Greenock and has been commented on by HMCIPS in previous inspection reports.

7.13 Bed frames in Darroch Hall are higher than elsewhere in HMP Greenock and in most other establishments. A number of smaller female prisoners reported difficulty when getting in and out of bed. This, coupled with insufficient in‑cell lighting during the hours of darkness, poses risks to the prisoners living in this accommodation.

Recommendation 16: HMP Greenock should ensure that beds fitted in Darroch Hall can be used safely by all prisoners.

7.14 All windows provide sufficient ventilation and are fitted with curtains to control the degree of natural light entering the cells.

7.15 All cells are fitted with a small lockable combination safe for the storage of personal items or medication and are used by most prisoners.

7.16 Prisoners generally do not display posters or photographs out with the designated areas within each cell.

7.17 All cells in Darroch Hall are generally clean and prisoners are provided with fit‑for‑purpose cleaning materials and are given the opportunity to clean their cells on a daily basis.

Chrisswell House

7.18 Chrisswell House is built over two levels with two sections on each level and comprises 64 single‑occupancy cells of which one is an accessible cell.

7.19 All cells are equipped with a chair and worktop area and provide sufficient room for prisoners to move around in. A high percentage of cell furniture in Chrisswell House is in poor condition. Additionally it lacks standardisation, with many cells having over or under the prescribed items of furniture. Disappointingly, prisoners spoken with whose cells were fitted with additional items of furniture stated they took them from other cells when the occupants moved out. Similarly, a prisoner who had just moved into Chrisswell House did not have the prescribed items of furniture and stated he would have to wait until a prisoner moved out of Chrisswell House before he would be able to take furniture from that cell. This situation indicates limited accommodation management or supervision on the part of Chrisswell House Staff. This is a weakness.

7.20 The cellular accommodation in Chrisswell House containing the least furniture lacks facilities to store and hang clothing. This has resulted in prisoners fitting makeshift items such as hangers and shelves.

Recommendation 17: HMP Greenock should remove all storage items out with the original cell design and provide prisoners with sufficient, appropriate storage facilities.

7.21 Despite single‑cell occupancy and prisoners having a key to their own cell, the absence of a lockable facility within the cell prevents them from storing personal items or medication safely and securely. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 18: HMP Greenock should ensure all prisoners in Chrisswell House are provided with a lockable storage facility.

7.22 Prisoners generally do not display posters or photographs out with the designated areas within each cell.

7.23 All windows provide sufficient ventilation and are fitted with curtains to control the degree of natural light entering the cells.

7.24 Cells in Chrisswell House are generally clean and prisoners are provided with fit‑for‑purpose cleaning materials and are given the opportunity to clean their cells on a daily basis.

Separate Cells

7.25 HMP Greenock does not have a Separation and Reintegration Unit (SRU), however a small unit comprising four separate cells is available and located adjacent to Ailsa Hall for those prisoners who are required to be segregated from others. These cells are very basic and would benefit from a degree of refurbishment.

7.26 Communal areas within Ailsa and Darroch Halls are clean and well presented. Staff and prisoners are to be commended on maintaining such high standards given the age of the building and the relatively poor fabric of some areas. Although Chrisswell House is the newest accommodation it is not as clean as the rest of the prison and presents as cluttered and untidy.

7.27 Both the main cafeteria and the dining room are clean and well maintained. Likewise all communal corridors within the establishment are maintained to a high level of cleanliness.

7.28 Despite the high levels of construction work taking place during the inspection, all external exercise yards and pedestrian and vehicle routes are all clean and free of obstruction.

STANDARD 8

Prisoners are allowed into the open air for at least one hour a day every day.

8.1 All prisoners in HMP Greenock can spend an hour each day in the open air. Access times are as follows:

Table 1: Access times

Area Weekdays Weekends
Ailsa Hall (Mainstream) 14:30-15:30 09:30-10:30
Ailsa Hall (Protection) 10:30-11:30 13:30-14:30
Darroch Hall 13:30-14:30 09:30-10:30
Chrisswell House Unrestricted during periods of unlock
Separate Cells Variable

Ailsa Hall

8.2 A hard surfaced area of sufficient proportions is located adjacent to Ailsa Hall and provides its prisoners with the facilities in which to access time in the open air. During the inspection, in excess of 70 mainstream prisoners regularly used this facility. Staff reported that this was the average usage for the time of year.

8.3 Lightweight waterproof jackets are issued to each prisoner for use during periods of inclement weather. Prisoners spoken with stated they valued this time spent outdoors.

Darroch Hall

8.4 Darroch Hall prisoners can access time in the open air in a designated area located at the end of the Hall. This external hard surfaced yard is large enough for the number of prisoners who use it. During the inspection, over 30 prisoners regularly took up the opportunity to use the facility.

8.5 Prisoners have access to a lightweight waterproof jacket from a communal stock to wear when outdoors in inclement weather. These jackets are regularly laundered ensuring that they are clean and dry when required.

Chrisswell House

8.6 Chrisswell House prisoners are able to access time in the open air freely during periods of unlock. They can choose to use the small artificial surface football park directly external to the cellular accommodation or they can walk around the perimeter of the building. During the inspection small numbers of prisoners were seen walking around the perimeter of the building regularly throughout the day.

8.7 Prisoners in Chrisswell House normally have suitable personal clothing for use in inclement weather, however staff confirmed that where this is not the case, they will be issued with a waterproof jacket.

STANDARD 9

Personal clothing is in decent condition, washed frequently and fits.

9.1 All prisoners on admission or transferring‑in from another establishment are permitted to retain any personal clothing approved by the prison. During observation Officers in Reception facilitated this at the time of the admission or transfer, encouraging prisoners to retain those items which were fit for purpose thus allowing them to retain a sense of personal identity. This is positive.

9.2 Additionally, prisoners in Ailsa and Darroch Hall are issued with prison clothing on admission or transfer and may access additional items if required. Prison issue clothing is clean, of good quality and available in a range of sizes.

9.3 Prisoners in Chrisswell House are allowed to wear their own clothing at all times and as such are not routinely issued with prison clothing. However, they can access prison issue clothing to supplement their own wardrobe or for use while working within the prison.

9.4 New underwear is available on request however uptake is low due largely to the prison's practice of encouraging prisoners to have their own clothing in use.

9.5 All prisoners in Darroch Hall and Chrisswell House have access to a clean towel every day. Prisoners in Ailsa Hall however are only issued with one towel per week. This level of disparity between Ailsa Hall and the remainder of the prison is unacceptable.

Recommendation 19: HMP Greenock should ensure that all prisoners have access to clean towels at such intervals that ensure they can maintain standards of personal cleanliness.

9.6 The laundry arrangements for both prison issue and personal clothing in HMP Greenock are good with prisoners being able to have their clothes washed regularly. The processes are sufficiently robust to ensure that all clothing is returned to the prisoner who sent it and that it is both washed and fully dried before being returned to the Hall. This is positive.

9.7 Prisoners who attended focus groups and those spoken with during the inspection were content with the clothing issued to them and the laundering process with some stating that they would wash their personal clothing themselves rather than use the prison Laundry. However these assertions were not borne out during the inspection where observation within the Laundry demonstrated a large amount of prisoners' personal clothing was being washed.

STANDARD 10

Bedding is supplied and laundered at frequent intervals.

10.1 Clean bedding is issued to prisoners on arrival at their residential area. Bedding in a random selection of cells in each residential area was examined and found to be in good condition. Bedding is laundered on a weekly basis.

10.2 A number of mattresses in each residential area were examined and found to be in good condition.

10.3 The pillows in use in HMP Greenock are uncomfortable and as noted in previous inspection reports, deemed unfit for purpose. However, HMIPS are pleased to note that SPS are in the process of procuring fit‑for‑purpose pillows and look forward to them being issued in HMP Greenock and across the rest of the SPS estate in due course.

STANDARD 11

Sanitary arrangements take account of health, hygiene and human dignity.

11.1 All prisoners in HMP Greenock have access to a lavatory and wash hand basin on a 24 hour basis.

Ailsa Hall

11.2 All cells in Ailsa Hall have a wash hand basin and an unenclosed in‑cell lavatory. Some partial screening provides a degree of privacy around the lavatory, however when the cell door is open the lavatory is in direct sight. In a small number of cells these screens have been removed.

11.3 There are four fully enclosed showers on each level of Ailsa Hall which are in a good state of repair. Prisoners must request permission to shower. While this causes no problems during the week, due to regime restrictions, prisoners are not guaranteed a shower at the weekend despite staff trying their best to accommodate their requests.

Recommendation 20: HMP Greenock should ensure that all prisoners can access a shower on a daily basis.

11.4 Staff check the visit list on a daily basis to ensure that prisoners who have a visit that day are allowed to shower prior to their visit. This is positive.

11.5 Prisoners who attend Physical Training (PT) shower in the gymnasium at the end of the session. The current showers provide no privacy as they are not enclosed, however the establishment have secured resources to install individual shower cubicles which will ensure privacy. This is positive.

11.6 Prisoners attending court can shower in the morning unless they are required to leave before normal unlock time in which case they are offered a shower the previous evening.

Darroch Hall

11.7 All cells in Darroch Hall have a wash hand basin and in‑cell lavatory. Screens provide a degree of privacy, however when the cell door is open the lavatory is in direct sight. Female prisoners complained about the lack of privacy especially when using the toilet during the night as routine staff observations may be carried out by a male officer.

Recommendation 21: HMP Greenock should ensure that all in‑cell lavatories are enclosed so as to ensure privacy.

11.8 There are four fully enclosed showers on each level of Darroch Hall and a bath on Level 2, all of which are in a good state of repair. Prisoners in Darroch Hall can access a shower on a daily basis.

11.9 Prisoners from Darroch Hall who attend PT are allowed to shower when they return to the Hall.

11.10 Prisoners attending court can shower in the morning unless they are required to leave before normal unlock time, in which case they are offered a shower the previous evening

Chrisswell House

11.11 Cells in Chrisswell House have in‑cell wash hand basins but do not have in-cell lavatories, however prisoners have access to communal lavatories within each section. These lavatories are fully enclosed ensuring privacy. During the inspection the urinal in one section was out of order, however this had been reported and was awaiting repair.

11.12 Prisoners can access one of the two fully enclosed showers on each level of Chrisswell House on a daily basis. Prisoners stated that there were regular problems with both water temperature and pressure in the shower facilities. This was accepted by management who said the problem was being investigated.

Recommendation 22: HMP Greenock should ensure that all showers operate effectively at the proper temperature and pressure.

11.13 Chrisswell House prisoners who attend PT can shower after their session or when they return to the Hall.

11.14 As prisoners have 24‑hour access to the ablutions they can shower prior to leaving the establishment for court or for a community work placement.

STANDARD 12

Food is adequate for health, varied and religiously and culturally appropriate.

12.1 The Kitchen is dated and requires a degree of refurbishment. In some areas floor and wall tiles are cracked or missing and wooden facings have been damaged making it more difficult to maintain the required levels of cleanliness. However the Kitchen is extremely clean and when last inspected by Inverclyde Council in August 2013 as part of a Food Hygiene Information Scheme, it was awarded a certificate at Pass level which is valid for two years. Observation showed staff and prisoners work hard to maintain these high levels of cleanliness. Appropriate cleaning materials and signage are in place throughout and prisoners are able to confirm which cleaning equipment would be used in each area. Clear and easy to understand cleaning instructions are available for each piece of machinery within the Kitchen.

12.2 Separate food storage and preparation areas are in place for different food types.

12.3 All prisoners employed in the Kitchen have a personal training record, signed by the Catering Officer and the prisoner. This record covers the following areas:

  • Health Screening (completed prior to taking up any food handling duties)
  • Provision of Food Handling: Fitness to Work information
  • Induction
  • Introduction to Food Hygiene
  • Manual Handling Awareness
  • Task and Machine Specific Training

12.4 A sample of personal training records for prisoners working in the Kitchen were checked and found to be up‑to‑date.

12.5 Fruit and vegetables are provided every day and on some days fruit is available both at lunch time and as part of the evening meal. This is positive.

12.6 Medical staff inform the Catering Manager of those prisoners who have special dietary requirements. Prisoners requesting a special diet on religious grounds are also catered for.

12.7 The food provided to prisoners in HMP Greenock is of a high standard. On weekdays prisoners are provided with a cereal pack, bread roll, preserve and milk for breakfast and have a choice of three dishes for both lunch and evening meal. At each meal one choice is usually a lighter option such as a baguette or roll and there is always a vegetarian option available. Bread is available at lunch and evening meal times.

12.8 At the weekend prisoners are provided with a brunch consisting of sausage, potato scone, hash browns, egg, and bread roll and for their evening meal have a choice of three dishes. Bread is also available during brunch and evening meals.

12.9 Chrisswell House prisoners who attend external community placements are provided with packed lunches.

12.10 As the Darroch Hall PT session takes place directly after the evening meal, many of those attending choose not to eat at this time, preferring instead to wait until they have completed their training. Those that choose to do this, inform the Catering staff who provide them with a salad which they can eat in their residential accommodation following their training. This is an area of good practice.

12.11 Food is prepared in the main Kitchen and transferred directly to the adjacent servery in the main cafeteria. This process removes the need for food to be stored in heated trollies for long periods and ensures that food is served at the correct temperature. Food for prisoners from Ailsa Hall is loaded into a heated trolley and immediately taken the short distance to the dining room where it is loaded into the servery. This prevents deterioration in the presentation of the food and enables it to be served at the correct temperature. When chips are on the menu they are cooked in the servery in Ailsa Hall to ensure they are fresh when served. The use of these serveries means that food is well presented and looks appetising. This is positive.

12.12 Meals are served at the following times:

Table 2: Meal times

Area Weekdays Weekends
Ailsa Lunch 12:15 Evening 17:45 Brunch 10:15 Evening 16:45
Darroch Lunch 12:45 Evening 18:15 Lunch 10:15 Evening 16:45
Chrisswell Lunch 12:15 Evening 17:45 Lunch 10:15 Evening 16:45

12.13 The times between most meals are not excessive, however a gap of over 16 hours between the evening meal on a Saturday and the brunch on a Sunday is too long. This is not an issue for prisoners in Chrisswell House who are provided with bread, margarine and preserve, however it is for prisoners in both Ailsa and Darroch Halls who are not provided with any additional food.

Recommendation 23: HMP Greenock should ensure that all prisoners are provided with food which they can eat during the gap between the last meal served on Saturday and the first meal served on Sunday.

12.14 Only those prisoners in the Separate Cells or those unfit to go to the dining rooms eat in their cells. All other prisoners eat in the dining rooms which are clean, well‑maintained and fit‑for‑purpose.

12.15 Prisoners are issued with clean crockery and cutlery each meal time which is subsequently washed after use in the main Kitchen or in the dining room servery. This is positive. Prisoners are issued with an additional set of crockery and cutlery for use in the residential accommodation which can only be washed in either in‑cell wash hand basins or sinks within the communal ablutions areas. This poses a risk.

OUTCOME 4

Prisoners are treated with respect by prison staff.

Overview

Relationships between staff and prisoners are positive across the whole prison which contributes to a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

Prisoners were positive regarding the escorted leave scheme as part of the National Top-End (NTE) testing process.

In general, all searching is carried out to an acceptable standard.

STANDARD 13

Respect is the underlying basis of all interactions between staff and prisoners.

13.1 Relationships between staff and prisoners are good and throughout the inspection positive relaxed interaction was evident. All staff wear their name badge and in the majority of cases staff and prisoners refer to each other by their first names. While nicknames are sometimes used, this is not done in a derogatory manner.

13.2 FLMs spoken with confirmed they would normally inform prisoners of unwelcome or sensitive news themselves, however the Personal Officer may do this if they had a particularly good relationship with the prisoner. Such news would be given in private in either the prisoner's cell or the FLM's Office.

13.3 A high volume of prisoners from Chrisswell House take part in the escorted leave scheme as part of the National Top-End testing process. During the inspection a number of prisoners who had recently been on escorted leave spoke in positive terms about their experiences.

13.4 Most prisoners in Ailsa Hall remain in HMP Greenock until their liberation dates. In the majority of cases they are content to do so as they are from the local area.

13.5 All prisoners in Darroch Hall are transferred‑in from other parts of the female estate and may at some stage in their sentence be required to transfer‑out to take part in programmes or for prisoner management purposes. In such cases, prisoners confirmed they expect to be involved in discussions with staff prior to any transfer. The FLM confirmed this and advised that arrangements are made to allow the prisoner to contact her family and where possible provide continuity of access to visits.

13.6 Should prisoners in Chrisswell House be progressed to the Open Estate or downgraded and returned to their home establishment, the decision to do so is discussed and agreed at a RMT meeting. The prisoner is made aware of these decisions in advance of the transfer date.

STANDARD 14

Security measures such as searching are carried out with regard to the protection of human dignity.

14.1 A number of rub down and body searches were observed throughout the inspection and in all cases they were carried out by Officers of the same gender as the prisoner. All searches observed were undertaken in a professional and thorough manner.

14.2 During observation of body searches undertaken in Reception, Officers gave the prisoner clear instruction and took time to explain what was going to happen. This is positive. As no female Officers work in Reception they are called on from other posts to search female prisoners on admission. This can result in female prisoners remaining in Reception for longer periods of time.

14.3 Cell searches observed confirmed that prisoners are present when their property or cells were searched.

OUTCOME 5

Good contact with family and friends is maintained

Overview

Visits are well managed and the interaction between staff and prisoners' visitors is positive. The visit room is spacious, clean and well-maintained.

Prisoners access to telephones is generally sufficient however access for those prisoners in Ailsa Hall can be restricted as a result of high demand.

There are no issues with prisoners sending or receiving mail.

STANDARD 15

Family visits are given high priority in terms of frequency, length and quality and are not restricted as part of any disciplinary or control process.

15.1 Facilities and arrangements in HMP Greenock to enable prisoners to maintain contact and develop constructive relationships with their families and friends are in place and are viewed positively by both prisoners and their visitors alike.

15.2 All Officers with specific family contact responsibilities wear blue name badges identifying this aspect of their role. In addition, their names and contact details are displayed in the visit areas with notices advising visitors to contact them should they have any concerns about their family member or friend who is in prison or if they encounter any difficulties with the visiting process.

15.3 With the consent of the prisoner, Family Induction is provided each week for those visitors who are about to visit the prison for the first time. Services provided in the induction include:

  • assistance with registration;
  • an awareness of visit policies and procedures;
  • an explanation of cash and property deposits for prisoners;
  • information relating to Assisted Prison Visiting Scheme (APVS), Families Outside services and "email a prisoner" scheme;
  • signposting of other service providers working with the prison both locally and on a national basis; and
  • an opportunity to meet with and talk to FCOs.

15.4 Visit timetables are clearly displayed and information on all aspects of the visiting procedures are widely available in the waiting area. Throughout the inspection several prisoners were afforded an extended visit with their family or friends, primarily, although not exclusively, as a result of the distance involved in getting to the prison from their home address. Prisoners and staff confirmed that the provision of such additional visiting time is common place. This is positive.

15.5 Directions to the prison and contact telephone numbers for local taxi firms are included in family information packs and displayed on visitors' notice boards. Car parking spaces are limited for both staff and visitors however off‑street parking is available and there are sufficient designated disabled parking bays adjacent to the main entrance. The prison is located within walking distance of both rail and bus stations and good road links exist to and from Greenock.

15.6 All prisoner visits are initiated by the visitor. A dedicated telephone line is open every day until noon allowing those family members and friends named by the prisoner as potential visitors to select and book a visit from the published schedule. Visitors spoken with said that they experienced no difficulties in booking visits and were almost always able to select a space in the session of their choice. Every week, prisoners are likely to be able to enjoy one visit during the week as well as one visit at the weekend.

15.7 There are no recorded instances where visits have been cancelled for any reason although recent flood damage to the visit room resulted in a restriction to visits for a short period of time until the area was made safe and the damage repaired.

15.8 Prisoners and their visitors are afforded the full visit allocation with no visit time taken up by administrative entry or exit procedures for either parties.

15.9 The visit schedule in place at the time of the inspection is noted below:

Table 3: Visit schedule

14:00-14:50 15:10-16:00 18:50-19:40 19:50-20:45
Monday Female Male Male Male
Tuesday Family Induction Family Induction Female Male
Wednesday No Visits No Visits Male Female
Thursday Male Female Male Male
Friday Male Male Male Female
13:45 - 15:00 15:25 - 16:25
Saturday Children's Visits Female Male
Sunday Children's Visits Male Female

15.10 The number and duration of visits is the same for all prisoners irrespective of status, gender, length of sentence, etc, and their visit entitlement is not related to assessments of their behaviour.

15.11 Where there is evidence of or intelligence information which would indicate that there is the potential for a prisoner to take part in a breach of security or discipline or criminal activity, prison management has the authority to place restrictions on the conditions under which that prisoner's visits take place. The documentation and procedures in place in HMP Greenock to manage such closed visiting arrangements were examined and found to be robust. Only two prisoners were subject to these protocols during the inspection and both had review dates set to consider any changes to their circumstances. An area designated to facilitate prisoners subject to closed visits is located on the mezzanine level above the main visit room and can accommodate three visits at any one time.

15.12 Similarly, effective measures are in place to exclude those visitors who have been involved in a breach of security or criminal activity within the prison environment. Examination of the records provide assurance that, on such occasions, fair and proportionate sanctions and arrangements are applied and that appropriate reviews take place.

15.13 Chrisswell House, as a NTE facility, holds prisoners from across Scotland and as a result many of their visitors are required to travel a distance from their home to the prison in order to maintain personal contact. Similarly, at the time of the inspection, the female prisoner population in Darroch Hall comprised individuals with home addresses across six Community Justice Authority (CJA) areas. The remainder of the prisoner population held in Ailsa Hall fare slightly better with the majority originating from one of the following three areas of North Strathclyde, Glasgow and Ayrshire, and Dumfries and Galloway.

15.14 Many prisoners from this latter group spoken with throughout the inspection complained that they had regularly been transferred between HMPs Greenock, Low Moss and/or Barlinnie. Prisoners and staff confirmed this and cited three main factors as having contributed to this situation; the opening of HMP Low Moss which now accepts prisoners direct from courts which previously sent prisoners directly to HMP Greenock; the move to single cell accommodation to alleviate overcrowding in the prison resulting in prisoners, originally bound for HMP Greenock after sentencing, being diverted elsewhere directly from court and the occasional response to national prisoner management activity or police initiatives.

15.15 Where possible, prisoners are given 48 hours advance notice that they are to be transferred to another prison and are expected to contact their family and friends to inform them of their transfer and cancel any visiting arrangements they may have made. If, however, there is insufficient notice given of the transfer or the prisoner has no funds with which to make telephone contact, a FCO may do so on their behalf.

STANDARD 16

Visitors are well treated

16.1 The interaction between staff and prisoners' visitors is positive. Staff are respectful and provide information and assistance with all aspects of the visiting procedures as required. Visitors spoken with were complimentary of the staff in the vestibule area and in the visit room. Checking‑in arrangements are completed swiftly and thoroughly despite the limited and somewhat awkward space available for these processes. After visitors have provided the requisite identification they are then asked to undertake physical security checks similar to those which staff experience on entry to the prison. This includes placing personal items through an X‑Ray machine and walking through a metal detecting portal. Lockers are provided for visitors to securely hold any valuables or articles not permitted in the visit room. Small transparent polythene bags are issued to visitors to allow them to take coins into the visit room in order to purchase items for themselves and those they are visiting from the snack bar.

STANDARD 17

Visits take place in the most relaxed environment compatible with security.

17.1 The visit room is spacious, clean and well‑maintained with prisoners' artwork displayed on the walls. Fifteen tables are well spaced‑out in the central part of the room with a further six offset to one side to accommodate visits for prisoners from Chrisswell House. The space between the tables provides sufficient privacy while at the same time allowing for appropriate levels of supervision. Each table has seating for one prisoner and three visitors and additional seating can be made available as required.

17.2 A door leads to a small outdoor patio area with four picnic‑style tables and chairs which prisoners and their visitors have access to, weather permitting. Sun screen is available as required via a wall‑mounted dispenser for use by those using this outdoor space.

17.3 A raised stage is fenced‑off and available as a play area with a good selection of toys, books and games for use by visiting children. During the children's visit sessions, volunteer crèche workers are on hand to encourage and assist prisoners to interact with their children. This is positive.

17.4 Prisoners are required to wear prison‑issue polo‑shirts or sweatshirts during visits unless they are from Chrisswell House where they are allowed to wear their own clothing at all times. These NTE prisoners are also allowed to personally access the snack‑bar and to handle cash unlike all other prisoners whose visitors must buy and pay for snacks and drinks on their behalf.

STANDARD 18

Telephone contact is made as easy as possible.

Ailsa Hall

18.1 Ailsa Hall has a telephone located on each of its four levels and a further three situated in the recreation room. Prisoners are required to request to use the telephones in the Hall however they have free access to those in the recreation room during periods of recreation. Staff are able to facilitate the majority of prisoners' requests for telephone access at specific times with some regularity during the first part of the working week however from Thursday, when prisoners are issued with their telephone credit, until Sunday by which time they have used most of it, the demand is such that in order to facilitate each request, staff have to limit the length of prisoners' calls. In some instances this can be as short as five minutes. This is a weakness.

Darroch Hall

18.2 A telephone for use by prisoners is situated on each of the two levels in Darroch Hall. Prisoners spoken with noted that when locked up, a verbal request to a member of staff would secure them access to the telephone or, if they were unlocked and in association they could freely use the telephone. Similarly, they did not raise any concerns in relation to the length of their calls.

Chrisswell House

18.3 There are four prisoner telephones in Chrisswell House, one in each section. During periods of unlock prisoners can use the telephones in any of the four sections and during patrol or night‑duty periods they have access to the telephone in their own section.

18.4 All telephones within HMP Greenock are fitted with privacy hoods. Prisoners spoken with throughout the prison had no concerns about being able to hear or be heard while using the telephone.

STANDARD 19

Letter contact is made as easy as possible.

19.1 There are no limits on the number of letters prisoners can send or receive in HMP Greenock. All outgoing mail, once handed to staff or left at the staff desk, is then taken to the administration building for posting.

19.2 From observation, and in conversation with prisoner's and staff, incoming mail is opened, but not read, in the presence of the recipient.

OUTCOME 6

Prisoners' entitlements are accorded them in all circumstances without facing difficulty.

Overview

Prisoners are provided with relevant information on admission.

The number of recorded prisoner complaints is low. Access to complaint forms is variable. Prisoners spoken with described the complaints system as unreliable.

While the library has copies of the appropriate prison rules, it has a limited selection of legal texts.

Separate cells are used sparingly with the appropriate records maintained.

STANDARD 20

Staff are aware of their duty of care to give prisoners their legal rights. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy and meet their obligations under it promptly.

20.1 Admissions to Ailsa and Darroch Halls complete a First Night Admission Checklist which explains the rules, punishments, complaints systems and how to make a request. This is also provided in written format to these prisoners.

20.2 Prisoners transferred‑in to Ailsa Hall from another establishment are informed of this information verbally, however are not issued with any written information. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 24: HMP Greenock should ensure written information regarding prisoners' legal rights and other relevant information is issued to prisoners on admission or transfer to HMP Greenock.

20.3 The information given to prisoners transferred‑in to Chrisswell House however focusses more heavily on the written booklet which explains the top‑end regime including access to the community via placements, Special Escorted Leave (SEL) and progression. Less emphasis is placed on providing information explaining the prison rules, punishments, complaints systems and requests as these prisoners, given the length of time already spent in prisons in Scotland, will be aware of such systems and procedures.

20.4 A clear process is in place throughout the prison which enables prisoners to request to meet with a member of the Visiting Committee (VC). The 2013‑14 VC Annual Report did not highlight any issues associated with this procedure.

20.5 Information promoting the role of the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) or how to contact them is not widely publicised across the prison. This is a weakness.

20.6 The process for the handling and distribution of privileged correspondence within HMP Greenock is good. On arrival at the establishment all privileged mail is forwarded to the Governor's Personal Assistant who records the details of the recipient and, where possible, the sender. This mail is then forward to the relevant residential areas where it is passed, unopened, to the prisoner who completes a signed record to confirm receipt.

20.7 When asked, staff confirmed that they would provide assistance to prisoners in accessing their Consular Official where necessary and could demonstrate an understanding of how to do so.

20.8 Prisoners in HMP Greenock are given access to meet with their Legal Agents. Prisoners are informed of the process for accessing these visits and how they are arranged.

20.9 A sample of the orderly room documentation was checked and found that in all cases the adjudicator had followed the prescribed process, confirming that the prisoner had received notification of and understood the charge and was prepared to continue with the adjudication. An adjudicator spoken with was able to satisfactorily explain the process followed should a prisoner request legal representation.

20.10 In the cases examined, the adjudicator had ensured that the prisoners were informed of their right to appeal any findings of guilt or punishments awarded and given information describing the process to do so.

STANDARD 21

Staff are aware of their duty to observe the Human Rights of prisoners. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

21.1 When asked, staff confirmed that they would provide assistance to prisoners in contacting the European Court of Human Rights.

STANDARD 22

Staff are aware of their duty to treat prisoners in accordance with fairness and natural justice. They know what this involves. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

22.1 Prisoners interviewed during the inspection advise that they are aware of how they can make a request, complaint or appeal against the outcome of a complaint. Information is displayed in several areas within the prison describing the complaints process. However, observation shows that the correct Prisoner Complaint Forms (PCFs) and Prisoner Appeal Forms (PAFs) are freely available to prisoners in only some areas of the prison. In other areas, prisoners are required to ask staff to provide them with the relevant forms. This is a weakness.

22.2 Records show that complaints are responded to within the correct timescales.

22.3 Staff interviewed advise that they attempt, in the first instance, to resolve prisoners concerns/complaints verbally and are able to evidence appropriate documentation should the individual wish to make a formal complaint. All staff interviewed were also able to discuss, in full, the complaints process and how prisoners could escalate their complaint.

22.4 A breakdown of complaints made from 1 January 2014 up to the time of the inspection is as follows:

Table 4: Complaints - 1 January-19 May 2014

Complaint No. of Complaints Nature of Complaints
PCF1 8 Visits x 4 Staff x 1 Orderly room x 1 Cell Hobbies x 1 Progression x 1
PCF2 10 Transfer x 3 Staff x 2 Property x 2 Parole x 1 Orderly room x 1 Housing x 1
PAF1 1 Punishment award x 1

22.5 Some prisoners spoken with said that they have no faith in the current complaint system and believe that making a complaint in HMP Greenock results in them being victimised. Conversely, staff spoken with believe that there is little need for prisoners to submit formal complaints as the majority of concerns raised are resolved through early informal intervention on their part. In comparison to other prisons, the volume of complaints is low however there is no evidence to suggest a correlation between this figure and the aforementioned beliefs held by either the prisoners or the staff.

Recommendation 25: HMP Greenock should explore the low number of complaints made and the reasons behind this.

22.6 While the Library has a copy of both the Prisons and Young Offenders Institutions (Scotland) Rules 2011 and the European Prison Rules, it has a very limited selection of legal texts available. Legal texts are available on request from Links Centre staff but few prisoners are aware of this. This is a weakness.

22.7 All prisoners leaving the establishment to attend court wear their personal clothing. For those prisoners who do not have suitable clothing of their own, a stock of both male and female clothing and footwear, which has been donated by other prisoners, is held in Reception for their use. This is positive.

22.8 There were 64 orderly room adjudications for breaches of discipline during March and April 2014, however a number of these included prisoners with multiple charges. This relatively low number supports the perception of staff who noted that where possible they would attempt to resolve matters prior to using the disciplinary process.

22.9 Prisoners who attended focus groups and those spoken with during the inspection felt the disciplinary process was used fairly in HMP Greenock.

22.10 A sample of adjudication documentation was checked which confirmed that prisoners who pled guilty were given the opportunity to present information in mitigation to the charge they faced. Similarly, on occasions when a prisoner pled not guilty to a charge their version of events was documented and considered by the adjudicator prior any decision being made. The evidence presented by any witnesses was also fully documented and considered. In addition, the decisions made by the adjudicator were based on the evidence presented. Punishments issued were not overly harsh with instances where punishments were suspended.

STANDARD 23

Segregation is used sparingly and in accordance with procedures.

23.1 The prison operates a policy where the separate cells are used sparingly and those prisoners who required to be separated from others are, where possible, held in their own cells. An examination of relevant records supports this position.

23.2 During the inspection there were no prisoners held in the Separate Cells. Records detailing their use between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2014 were examined and show that they were used on 25 occasions and the maximum length of time any prisoner spent in one of these cells was 6 days. All of the prisoners held during this period had been removed from association under Rule 95 of the Prisons and Young Offenders Institutions (Scotland) Rules 2011 or confinement to a cell as part of an Orderly Room adjudication award. A file review confirmed that the correct procedure had been followed for all prisoners managed under Rule 95 conditions and that they were informed of the reasons for their confinement and allowed an opportunity to make self‑representations.

23.3 Prisoners located in the Separate Cells are managed by staff from Ailsa Hall who maintain records of each prisoner's access to daily activities while in the unit. A number of these records were checked which confirmed that prisoners are asked if they wish to spend time in the open air every day, take a shower and are visited by a medically qualified person. In addition, the frequency and nature of any interaction between staff and prisoners is recorded. During their time in the Separate Cells, prisoners do not attend activities in the gymnasium or in the Learning Centre.

Part 3 - Opportunities For Self‑Improvement And Access To Services And Activities

OUTCOME 7

Prisoners take part in activities that educate, develop skills and personal qualities and prepare them for life outside prison.

Overview

The National Induction Programme is delivered in HMP Greenock however scheduling could be improved.

A functioning Personal Officer Scheme is in place and the quality and delivery of Integrated Case Management (ICM) is good however expected deadlines for some aspects of the process should be met.

Prisoners in HMP Greenock have adequate access to recreational, vocational and educational activities in addition to traditional prison employment. A review of purposeful activity in the prison was on-going at the time of the inspection and HMCIPS will monitor the outcomes of the review with interest.

Delivery of programmed interventions to address offending behaviours should better reflect the aggregated needs of the prison's population.

Library facilities, resources and access should be improved.

Community work placements for those prisoners in the National Top-End (NTE) facility are good with over 20 opportunities available however prisoners cannot attend at weekends.

Access to religious representatives and faith-based activities is positive.

Arrangements for prisoners to purchase items from the canteen are good and responsive to the outcomes for Prisoner Information Action Committee (PIAC) meetings.

STANDARD 24

The regime of the prison encourages prisoners to make the most of their time there and to exercise responsibility.

24.1 All prisoners within HMP Greenock are offered the opportunity to attend the National Induction Programme. Staff from the Rehabilitation and Support Team working in the Links Centre deliver the induction each week and ensure that a list of newly admitted prisoners, taken from the SPS prisoners' electronic records system (PR2), is regularly sent to residential staff who encourage those prisoners' attendance at the induction session.

24.2 Delivery of the induction is scheduled on a rolling basis with mainstream prisoners from Ailsa Hall being accommodated in Week 1, prisoners from Chrisswell House and protection prisoners from Ailsa Hall in Week 2 and female prisoners from Darroch Hall in Week 3. Despite meeting the SPS guidelines, such scheduling can result in some prisoners having to wait three weeks before receiving the national induction which is less than ideal for those in prison for the first time.

24.3 The content follows the national programme with staff delivering the session identifying those in custody for the first time and offering to make the relevant referrals for all who are identified as in need of further assessment, support or intervention. Delivery was informal yet controlled with staff encouraging interaction, answering questions as they arose and ensuring that recipients of the induction understood each section before moving on to the next.

24.4 During the induction observed at the time of the inspection, only the Addiction Services Team made a contribution, however representatives from the Learning Centre are normally regular contributors. While Chaplains do not attend the National Induction session, they do visit all prisoners as soon as practicable after admission.

24.5 There is a functioning Personal Officer Scheme in place within HMP Greenock. In discussion, prisoners across the prison indicated a positive regard for staff, which translates across to their Personal Officers. Observed interactions between Personal Officers and staff were generally positive and indicate genuine interest in the prisoners' custodial lives. This is positive.

24.6 There is evidence of regular meetings taking place between canteen administration staff and prisoners to discuss issues affecting the range, quality and price of goods available to purchase in the prisoners' canteen and through the sundries scheme. Similar meetings take place between catering staff and prisoners to discuss all aspects of food served to prisoners within HMP Greenock. A review of the minutes available provides evidence which points to such prisoner consultation having a positive impact on the outcomes for prisoners in both these areas. There are also examples of prisoners having been consulted about specific elements of the visiting process. It is disappointing that the positive practice of prisoner involvement and consultation is not more widely spread throughout other areas of the prison.

24.7 HMP Greenock is unique in the way it implements the Integrated Case Management (ICM) process, as it does not have a designated group of staff whose primary duty is to co‑ordinate ICM casework. This responsibility is delegated to Residential Officers who are required to be active in all aspects of the ICM process, including preparing Community Integration Plans (CIP) and chairing of case conferences.

24.8 All prisoners admitted to the prison are checked by the ICM administrator who tracks them to ensure that core screens are completed, and for prisoners eligible for enhanced ICM, arrangements are in place for Case Managers to be assigned. Officers allocated a case load are responsible for reviewing CIPs. There are benefits of this devolved approach in that it encourages the development of meaningful interactions between staff and prisoners, thus supporting behavioural change. Inspectors observed tangible indicators of meaningful staff-prisoner relationships during case management discussions evidenced by both the frequency and nature of contact between staff and prisoners. In the ICM conferences observed by the Inspectors there appeared genuine interest and collaborative working. This is positive.

24.9 However, the potential benefits of the approach adopted at HMP Greenock to ICM are undermined by persistent failures in meeting expected timescales for aspects of the ICM process. For example, records indicate that between November 2013 and May 2014, on 12 occasions CIPs were not updated by Personal Officers two weeks prior to a planned ICM Case Conference and on four occasions risk assessment information was not available to review.

Table 5: Details of ICM Timescales Missed

Month/Year ICM timescales Missed Aspect of the process missed
April 2014 6 6 CIP not updated by expected timescales
March 2014 3 1 CIP not updated by expected timescales 1 CIP not updated by expected timescales 1 Risk Assessment information supplied late
February 2014 1 1 Risk Assessment information supplied late
December 2013 1 4 CIP not updated by expected timescales 2 Risk Assessment information supplied late
November 2013 2 2 CIP not updated by expected timescales

Recommendation 26: HMP Greenock should ensure that expected timescales for all the components of the Integrated Case Management process are met timeously so that this does not undermine potential outcomes.

STANDARD 25

A full day's out of cell activities, such as work, education, leisure and cultural pursuits, is available for seven days of the week.

25.1 Through engagement in work, training, learning, PT, recreation, exercise and other structured activities, the majority of prisoners in HMP Greenock are not locked in their cells for long periods each day.

25.2 Prisoners housed in Chrisswell House are offered an open regime as befits their supervision status. During night‑duty and patrol periods they are secured within their own sections with free access to its communal areas. For the remainder of the time they have free access to all communal areas within their residential accommodation as well as its perimeter walkway and small football park.

25.3 Women prisoners held in Darroch Hall, when not engaged in purposeful activities out with their living accommodation, have decent levels of access to showers, telephones and evening recreation. At weekends however, due to a conflict of timetabled activities, they are unable to attend PT and spend time in the open air as both these activities are scheduled at the same time. This is a weakness.

25.4 The regime in Ailsa Hall allows half the population to engage in recreation in the afternoons and the other half in the evening. At weekends however Ailsa Hall prisoners are only offered recreation on a Saturday or Sunday and not both. This is a weakness.

25.5 All prisoners, unless prevented from leaving their cells for reasons of security or ill‑health, take their meals in one of two communal dining facilities. As well as delivering food directly from kitchen to plate without having to transport it around the prison prior to serving, both facilities offer prisoners significant opportunities throughout each day to engage in social interaction with others. This is positive.

25.6 Space within the prison for prisoners to engage in purposeful activity is limited and this is reflected in the volume of education, training, PT and work delivered each day. There are four vocational training areas; Painting and Decorating, Industrial Cleaning, Hairdressing and Bricklaying. Activity opportunities are also available in the "service" industries within the prison including catering, cleaning, laundering and recycling. Two busy joinery work sheds provide employment for both male and female prisoners however this popular activity too is limited due to a lack of space.

25.7 A regime development programme, aimed at increasing prisoners' access to purposeful activities, is underway with a target of 152 activity spaces being made available by December 2014. Once realised, this increase, together with the existing PT and learning provision, will enhance this situation. HMIPS will monitor the progress of the programme.

STANDARD 26

The programme of work and related training focuses on equipping prisoners for employment on release.

26.1 HMP Greenock offers a good range of work and training opportunities which are generally well attended. The majority of prisoners participate in work parties, training opportunities or work placements. Approximately 135 prisoners are involved in these activities daily. Female prisoners work in the laundry, the timber production workshop, the hairdressers, the pantry, a poppy party for vulnerable prisoners and in pass duties. Male prisoners work in the hairdressers, the wood assembly workshop, the environmental cleaning party, industrial cleaners, the kitchen and in a range of pass duties. However, there is a limited range of qualifications available within industrial workshops and vocational training programmes.

26.2 A small number of male and female prisoners participate in British Institute of Cleaning Sciences (BICS) courses. Prisoners can also access two National Progression Awards (NPA) in Painting and Decorating or Bricklaying. However, due to staff absence and redeployment, the painting programme would not be offered for two weeks and the bricklaying programme had only recently commenced after a gap of over a year. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 27: HMP Greenock should ensure that prisoners' work and training opportunities are not unduly impacted on by staff absences.

26.3 The prison has advanced plans in place to offer two new NPAs in hairdressing and cosmetology. The cosmetology programme will be solely for female prisoners. The prison offers the hairdressing courses in conjunction with staff and students from the nearby Greenock Campus of West College Scotland. Anecdotal information suggests that a few prisoners who undertook previous hairdressing workshop duties enrolled on college hairdressing programmes upon release.

26.4 The prison has well‑equipped wood production and assembly workshops with industry‑standard machinery. Prisoners produce a range of wood‑based furniture including garden furniture which support SPS contracts with furniture retailers.

26.5 The prison also provides over 20 work placement opportunities in the local community for male prisoners. These programmes are highly effective in helping prisoners gain important employability skills which could prove useful in looking for employment when they are released. They also help prisoners to improve their self‑esteem and develop self‑confidence.

STANDARD 27

A broad and relevant education programme is available.

27.1 New College Lanarkshire is contracted to deliver a target of 18,000 prisoner learning hours at HMP Greenock. The College meets this target each year. The Learning Centre is well managed and a small team of part‑time teaching staff are highly committed to meeting the learning needs of prisoners.

27.2 Although the Learning Centre meets the criteria of the SPS contract, the range of programmes on offer is constrained by the contract. The curriculum is not sufficiently wide enough to provide all prisoners with the range and depth of subjects to progress beyond core skills and best meet the needs of specific prisoners. This is a weakness.

27.3 The Learning Centre provides a welcoming environment for prisoners to engage in purposeful learning activities. Overall it is well‑equipped and prisoners are able to access a range of learning resources, including computers.

27.4 The Learning Centre timetables 80 classes each week. Approximately 46% of prisoners attend education classes each month for at least one session per week. However, 30% of prisoners who are scheduled to attend education classes do not appear. This is a weakness. Class sizes are small with average class attendance of four prisoners. Male prisoners can attend up to 10 sessions per week and female prisoners up to five sessions per week.

27.5 Almost all learning is self‑directed and appropriately supported well by tutors where required. Prisoners engage purposefully in an appropriate range of basic and core skills learning activities, including literacy and numeracy Scottish Credit and Qualification Framework (SCQF) Levels 2‑6. A more limited range of other subjects, including art and flexible learning units is also offered.

27.6 A few project‑based classes are delivered to prisoners, including life skill classes in food and nutrition. Female prisoners are currently engaged in a successful knitting class producing work of a high standard. Prisoners produce and record prison radio programmes in the Learning Centre and these are broadcast to prisoners across the prison daily.

27.7 Relationships between prisoners and Learning Centre staff are positive and mutually respectful. Prisoners attending classes value the interaction and support provided by the Learning Centre staff and manager.

27.8 Most Learning Centre activities are certificated and in the last 12 months, 364 Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) awards have been achieved by prisoners. Prisoner success is celebrated through periodic awards ceremony in the Learning Centre.

27.9 There are no prisoners receiving one‑to‑one intensive support with literacy, numeracy or computing. However, with most classes small in numbers, teaching staff are able to support prisoners who need additional help.

27.10 Prisoners in work parties or on training programmes are not disadvantaged financially by attending education classes. Prisoners at education classes receive £7.50 for attending a minimum of five sessions per week. An enhanced wage structure is in place for those prisoners who attend more than five and up to 10 sessions. During their time in education, prisoners who demonstrate good attendance, attitude and commitment receive another £2, so that prisoners who are full‑time in the Learning Centre and have demonstrated good attitude and commitment can receive £11 per week. However, there is no similar payment structure in place for female prisoners who attend education classes due to the timetable limitation of one session per day in the Learning Centre.

27.11 Rates of pay differ according to the type of prisoner work party. Standard wages are paid in line with the SPS Wage Earnings Policy with bonus payments attainable for some specific parties.

27.12 There are good opportunities for creativity and self‑development within the Learning Centre. Prisoners can access art classes and creative writing classes and there are regular opportunities for music classes.

27.13 Prisoners in Greenock are mostly convicted prisoners, serving short‑term sentences or long‑term prisoners being prepared for the Open Estate. There are few prisoners held in the prison who are on remand. The length of sentences of the prisoners helps the prison to maintain prisoners on vocational and education courses for their duration, with very few prisoners being transferred during their courses.

27.14 Education classes are rarely cancelled. Where a class is cancelled, prisoners are given a reason. The Learning Centre Manager ensures that cover for classes is effective.

27.15 The prison offers a good range of activities in the gymnasium. Prisoners have regular access to the facility seven days per week. Activities are prioritised so that those prisoners who work can access the gymnasium later in the day. Female prisoners use the gymnasium well and have good access at regular times. Staff encourage prisoners to come to the gymnasium and offer individual programmes for prisoners which meet their needs well. The equipment is basic but in good condition and is used well by groups of prisoners. The physical training instructors (PTIs) undertake focus group meetings with prisoners to ascertain their needs and discuss the types of activities that can be offered.

STANDARD 28

A range of interventions is in place to encourage prisoners to address those behaviours which may contribute to their offending.

28.1 The ICM process was supported by effectively communicated risk assessments, which are observed to be relevant and based on the use of an appropriate risk assessment tool. It was apparent that the frequency of contact achieved by the Prison Based Social Work (PBSW) and the prisoners aided the development of a shared understanding of risk and needs areas. This is positive.

28.2 Approved and accredited programmes (or those eligible for approval and accreditation) are delivered by the Links Centre staff. In the current financial year HMP Greenock plan to have a total of 88 completions. Programmes include Constructs (16), Survive & Thrive (16), Alcohol Awareness (16), Mellow Parenting (24) and Drug Action for Change (16). At the moment, a total of 16 spaces have been allocated for the women, eight on the Alcohol Awareness programme and eight on the Drug Action for Change Programme.

28.3 Consistent with previous years, a significant number of the participants on the Constructs Group were transferred‑in from HMP Shotts specifically to undertake the programme. It was reported that the transfer of prisoners was designed to assist other prisons meet their prisoners identified programme needs. Programme delivery targets appeared to be set on the basis of what could be delivered rather than from an analysis of aggregated need within HMP Greenock. The Interventions Manager believes that HMP Greenock needed more accredited programme provision for women offenders, particularly the Female Offending Behaviour Programme, and the Substance Related Offending Behaviour Programme (SROBP) for all prisoners. There was no evidence of the routine examination of programme lists or an analysis of aggregated needs.

Recommendation 28: HMP Greenock should ensure that they undertake an analysis of aggregated programme needs so that their programme delivery accurately reflects their populations aggregated risk/needs profile.

28.4 A snapshot examination of prisoner records on PR2 indicated notable waiting lists for Constructs (11) and the SROBP (10), with negligible waiting lists for all the accredited (or those eligible for accreditation) group work interventions delivered across the estate. This snapshot picture does not appear to reflect the proposed targets at HMP Greenock, with an apparent under‑representation for the SROBP. The data also suggests that there are sufficient prisoners in HMP Greenock who require Constructs.

Recommendation 29: HMP Greenock should ensure that they regularly review their populations programmes lists from the Prison Records System to provide assurance that prisoners resident at HMP Greenock have equitable access to group work programmes.

28.5 The Interventions Manager reported that at the time of the inspection there were 12 prisoners listed for a generic programmes assessment, with the majority of referrals being received from core screens. From discussions with staff, their awareness of the range of risk reduction and approved activities available to prisoners was inconsistent. Some Officers had a good awareness of the programmes available in HMP Greenock whereas others had a limited understanding.

Recommendation 30: HMP Greenock should ensure that Personal Officers are aware of the range of available programmes to make sure that referrals for Generic Programmes Assessments are made to Programme Facilitators for those individuals who may benefit from group work interventions.

STANDARD 29

There is a programme of cultural and voluntary activities.

29.1 Prisoners have a television in their cell and can access a range of channels which also provides national radio coverage. Prisoners can order newspapers at their own expense if they wish.

29.2 The Library is located in a small cupboard within the Links Centre, which can only reasonably accommodate two or three prisoners at any one time. There is no seating or tabled area and so the facility is not conducive for learning. Overall, it is poorly stocked. There is a reasonable stock of fiction work, but of very limited genres. There are no reference or educational text books.

29.3 There is no material available in other media, such as talking books or DVDs. The Library is not well stocked with materials that take account of cultural and religious backgrounds of the prisoner population. There are no books in languages other than English. The stock has not been added to for a considerable period of time.

Recommendation 31: HMP Greenock should that the prisoners' Library provides a wider range of textbooks and DVDs.

29.4 Male prisoners can access the Library during visits to the Links Centre for other activities between 09:00 and 12:00 on Mondays to Fridays and female prisoners between 14:00 and 16:00 on the same days. Prisoners can also request to be taken to the Library from their residential accommodation during this period, but it is dependent on Officer availability to provide an escort.

29.5 Prisoners in work parties or in the Learning Centre are unable to access the Library during these periods. The Library is not available in the evenings or at weekends. There is no mobile service available to prisoners in their Halls. Prisoners in Darroch Hall have access to a small local collection of books located in a spare room but again the range of stock and number of titles is limited.

Recommendation 32: HMP Greenock should ensure that prisoners have increased access to the Library.

29.6 There is very poor stock control within the Library. The database containing the collection catalogue has been lost and there is no current inventory of stock. A prisoner, allocated a few hours per week, is currently cataloguing the entire stock but there is no indication as to how long this exercise will take.

29.7 Evening recreational activities in HMP Greenock focus predominately on traditional prison pastimes such as snooker, darts, table tennis and card games. Games consoles are also available. PT classes are available during evenings and at weekends. No evening classes are delivered by the learning provider. The Prison Fellowship is very active within the prison and provides a well‑attended service to prisoners on two weekday evenings and on Sunday afternoons.

29.8 The prison offers a range of work placements to male prisoners from Chrisswell House who are preparing to progress to the Open Estate. Twenty‑one prisoners are currently on placements which include a hospice furniture store, sporting clubs, a social enterprise company and a carpet store. Prisoners are developing a range of important skills while working in these placements. They learn to work with others and be trusted; they feel part of a team and take instruction well from their supervisors. The supervisors in the placements spoken with commended the prisoners on their attitude and commitment to the activities they undertake while on placement. However, prisoners cannot attend placements at the weekend when in some cases the placement could use them more effectively and meet the demands of their customers. This is a weakness.

29.9 Prisoners have participated in various work parties that have involved a number of local community organisations as part of restorative justice projects. A number of prisoners were involved in a project renovating a building for a local not‑for‑profit charity "Reach for Autism". Some prisoners helped to build a ramp to improve access for disabled people. Other prisoners decorated all of the internal rooms and the industrial cleaning work party provided a deep clean of the property prior to opening. Prisoners on the environmental work party provide on‑going ground maintenance on a monthly basis. This is positive.

29.10 Some prisoners volunteer to work with service users with additional support needs from the local community. The "Fit Together" group meets weekly in the prison gymnasium and lead a variety of games, fitness and social activities with the service users supported by staff. Prisoners learn about the issues faced with additional support needs and gain valuable skills for citizenship. Some volunteer prisoners also achieve the SQA unit "Preparing to Work with People with Special Needs" at Intermediate 2 Level.

STANDARD 30

Opportunities to practise their religion are available to all prisoners.

30.1 The Chaplaincy Team in HMP Greenock consist of representatives from the Church of Scotland (CoS), the Roman Catholic (RC) Church and the Muslim faith, all of whom attend on a part‑time basis. Representatives from other religions will attend the establishment as required.

30.2 While representatives of the Chaplaincy Team do not attend National Induction sessions, a member of the team will meet with all new admissions to the prison and refer them to the representative of their chosen religion if required. In addition, the RC priest spoken with stated staff are proactive in contacting the Chaplaincy Team on the prisoners' behalf. This is positive.

30.3 CoS services for male prisoners take place on Sunday at 09:00 and for female prisoners at 10:00 on Sunday. RC services for male prisoners take place on Sunday at 09:00 and for female prisoners on Monday at 19:00. On average, approximately ten prisoners attend each service. Muslim prayers take place every Tuesday afternoon. The Prison Fellowship visit the establishment each Wednesday and Friday to meet with female and male prisoners respectively. A weekly prayer group takes place on a Wednesday and a prison visiting group (previously the HOPE group), consisting of seven volunteers visit those prisoners who may not otherwise have any visits with family or friends. The Chaplaincy Team facilitate events at Easter, Christmas and at other times during the year and participate in Prisoners Week celebrations.

30.4 There are two community placement opportunities for NTE prisoners in a RC Church in Paisley.

30.5 Religious services are held in a multi‑purpose room which is large enough to accommodate all who wish to attend services. This room is also used as a prisoner lifestyle/training kitchen and has cookers, worktops and sinks fitted on the walls around the room, three of which are concealed by a curtain during religious services. HMIPS have previously commented on areas such as these not being wholly appropriate for religious services, however when spoken with the Chaplaincy Team did not comment negatively on the facility.

STANDARD 31

Suitable arrangements to enable prisoners to buy a range of personal and other items that meet prisoners' needs are in place and available and accessible as necessary.

31.1 Suitable arrangements are in place to allow prisoners to purchase personal items from both the prison canteen and through the sundry purchase scheme. Both purchase routes are well administered and the range and quality of goods are adequate.

31.2 Prisoners can purchase cards for all occasions through the sundry purchase scheme. This allows for personal choice to be better exercised by the prisoner through describing all aspects of the card(s) to be purchased including, style, size and cost rather than selecting from a limited stock.

31.3 Staff administering the canteen process regularly check if any ethnic minority prisoners are using the canteen service and if so, that they are purchasing items from stock. Where it appears that such prisoners are not availing themselves of this service, the canteen administrator will approach the prisoner and ask if there are any specific goods they would like to purchase. They also gather this type of information from canteen Prison Information Action Committee (PIAC) meetings or via suggestions written on prisoners' canteen sheets. Requests for goods specifically related to an individual's ethnic or cultural needs may then be made available to them via the sundry purchase scheme or, in cases where the prisoner is expected to remain in prison for a period of time and assuming the goods have a reasonable shelf‑life, the prison may consider including them in the regular canteen stock.

31.4 Canteen and sundry prices are usually the same as or cheaper than those in HMPs Low Moss and Barlinnie. HMP Greenock regularly use these two prisons as comparators as well as comparing prices with a national lower‑end supermarket. Profit margins are close to the SPS average.

31.5 Recent changes to and additions to the canteen stock were examined and can be directly linked to previous comments made by prisoners at PIAC meetings, for example alternative/additional toiletry items and make‑up.

31.6 Observation of the sundry purchase scheme in operation indicates provision of a good service. For example, the quality, price and delivery method of the fresh fruit brought via this scheme was very good.

31.7 The canteen/sundry service also provides employment for a prisoner on placement from Chrisswell House. He provides assistance to the three members of staff in delivering the bag and tag style canteen provision to convicted prisoners on a weekly basis and twice weekly to untried prisoners. All prisoners admitted from court and transferred in from other prisons are provided with a canteen service on the morning following admission.

OUTCOME 8

Healthcare is provided to the same standards as in the community outside prison, available in response to need, with a full range of preventative services, promoting continuity with health services outside prison

Overview

Healthcare is provided by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. The range of services provided is generally good and meets the needs of the prisoner population however the prison and the service provider should work together to ensure prisoners are afforded the proper level of confidentiality especially in relation to referrals and medical records.

The dentist's schedule could be better implemented to ensure optimum prisoner access.

In response to perceived needs of long-term prisoners healthcare staff have established a drop-in clinic in Chrisswell House, with plans to further extend this provision to female prisoners in Darroch hall. There is a good range of nurse-led clinics in place.

Prisoners' healthcare records do not routinely accompany them on transfer between prisons.

While a wide range of services and interventions is available to prisoners presenting with addictions, there is a lack of an overall strategy within NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde to guide the provision of these services within HMP Greenock.

STANDARD 32

Health services of a high quality are available to all who need them.

32.1 Prisoners can access a range of healthcare services through a self‑referral process. Referral forms are available in all residential areas. In Darroch Hall and Chrisswell House completed referral forms are posted in a locked box which is only accessible by healthcare staff. In Ailsa Hall however, prisoners do not always use the referral forms and note their medical condition on scrap paper and in all cases pass the referral to staff removing any aspect of confidentiality. This is a weakness. If there are concerns about a prisoner's health, referrals can be made from other sources including staff and family members.

32.2 The Healthcare Team have determined that a number of long‑term prisoners in Chrisswell House did not access healthcare regularly. In response, they have established a drop‑in clinic once per week in Chrisswell House which prisoners are able to attend and discuss any concerns with the nurse or to have health screens including having blood pressure and weight taken. An average of 12 prisoners per week attend the clinic. There are plans to extend this to the female prisoner population in Darroch Hall. An addictions drop‑in clinic is also in place in Chrisswell House. This is positive.

32.3 Medical cover comprising a four hour session each weekday is provided by a group of doctors who work across the three SPS establishments in the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Health Board area (HMPs Barlinnie, Low Moss and Greenock). There is a requirement for 7.5 whole time equivalent (WTE) doctors across the three areas, however there are only 4.1 in post, 1 of which is the Greenock doctor who is currently on long term sick absence, with the remainder of the service provided by agency and locum doctors. This presents difficulties in consistency of treatment and in covering Saturday clinics when those prisoners admitted on a Friday night are seen.

32.4 Out‑of‑hours cover is provided by Police Custody Forensic Medical Examiners (FMEs). Staff can contact the Police Custody hub and a nurse will triage their call. They will then ask a doctor to phone back if appropriate. Emergency medical services can be accessed via 999. From January 2014 to March 2014 there were six phone contacts made to the out‑of‑hours GP service and no call‑outs required. During this same timeframe, the average length of time prisoners had to wait for a routine GP appointment was two days.

32.5 There is one WTE mental health nurse in the prison, supported by the three addictions nurses who are also qualified mental health nurses. Emergency referrals to the mental health nurse are seen within 24 hours. The mental health nurse is supported by a Consultant Psychiatrist who carries out a weekly clinic and is available for telephone advice or to see prisoners who present in crisis.

32.6 Prisoners can access podiatry and optician services. These are provided on an as‑required basis with priority given to diabetic patients. Waiting time for a routine appointment is between four and six weeks.

32.7 Dental services are delivered in a purpose‑built dental room. A number of prisoners have had to wait over 10 weeks for a routine appointment with the dentist. If the prisoner is in pain or has an infection they will see a nurse who will consult with a doctor to have pain killers or antibiotics prescribed as required. Delays in accessing the dentist are linked to the prison regime and the limited space within the healthcare centre. A number of different clinics are run in the healthcare centre at the same time as the dentist. This is further complicated as male and female prisoners cannot access the healthcare centre at the same time. This can lead to periods of time when the dentist is in the healthcare centre but is unable to access prisoners on his waiting list. This is a weakness.

32.8 There is no dental hygienist service in the prison. Long‑term prisoners, particularly those in Chrisswell House, have no access to routine six monthly check‑ups with the dentist.

Recommendation 33: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that prisoners have access to routine dental appointments to ensure dental services are provided to the same standard as in the community.

32.9 When prisoners are transferred in from other SPS establishments their medical records should, but do not always, accompany them. This is a weakness. Healthcare staff have access to the NHS electronic patient record (VISION) which allows them access to prisoners' healthcare records already held in the community or from previous establishments. Staff also have access to the electronic clinical portal which allows them to access any correspondence and test results from any hospital appointments attended by the prisoner prior to coming into prison. The Electronic Care Summary (ECS) is also available. This is an electronic record of the prisoners current medication regime and includes information on any on‑going chronic illness such as asthma or diabetes. Staff are then able to access any information that is not on the ECS such as psychiatric medication from the prisoners GP.

32.10 The healthcare centre is cleaned by prisoners. While they are always supervised they may be able to read confidential information such as prescriptions or referral forms which have been left unattended and within view. This is a weakness.

32.11 Prisoners are escorted to and from the healthcare centre by Officers. The officers are given lists of the prisoners who have to attend. Some of the lists observed during the inspection had details of why the prisoner was coming to the healthcare centre noted on them. This information is not relevant to the officers carrying out the escort.

Recommendation 34: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that confidential information is appropriately managed.

32.12 Where healthcare staff have any concerns about prisoners they add a medical marker to their electronic records on PR2. This is a short note to officers to highlight any possible risks including known conditions such as epilepsy or possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms. The information shared is kept to a minimum for the purposes of managing any potential risks.

32.13 If officers have any concerns that a prisoner is under the influence of illicit substances they will refer them to a member of the healthcare staff who will then meet with the prisoner concerned. A local protocol has been developed to manage this which involves healthcare staff testing the prisoner's urine for any illicit substances and conducting a set of physical observations. If they have concerns about the prisoner they will instruct officers to place the prisoner on increased observation levels. This is an area of good practice. The details of the healthcare examination are not shared with officers.

32.14 Only one prisoner has had to be transferred to a mental health setting in the 12 months prior to the inspection. This was for the purposes of evaluation rather than as a result of being acutely unwell. If prisoners do require to be transferred this can be arranged quickly as the Consultant Psychiatrist who covers the prison is available for emergency referrals and where necessary is able to admit prisoners to the local mental health hospital. There are systems in place to access consultant input if the prison psychiatrist is not available. This is an area of good practice.

32.15 Prisoners have access to a wide range of nurse‑led clinics including:

  • Asthma clinic;
  • Diabetic clinic;
  • Blood Borne Virus clinic;
  • Learning disability clinic;
  • Smoking cessation clinic;
  • Sexual health clinic; and
  • Well‑man and well‑woman clinics.

32.16 Nurse practitioners working in the healthcare centre have dedicated, ring‑fenced time to provide these clinics. Some of the clinics are supported by staff from NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde who work out with the prison. Condoms can be ordered through the canteen free of charge, supplied by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

32.17 NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde have appointed a learning disability liaison nurse who works across all three SPS establishments in the health board area. The main purpose of the role initially is to scope what services there are for people with a learning disability in the prisons. A pilot to screen for learning disability when prisoners are admitted has just finished. Those screened as having a potential learning disability were seen for further assessment by the learning disability liaison nurse. This is an area of good practice.

32.18 Prisoners are able to take part in NHS screening programmes such as bowel cancer screening and diabetic retinal screening.

32.19 There were examples of prisoners with specific conditions receiving specialist support from both within and out with the prison. For example, a prisoner with motor neurone disease was referred to the community young chronic sick team. They were given input from speech and language therapy, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and a motor neurone disease specialist nurse. Another prisoner with cancer was given input from the local hospice, MacMillan nurses, pain clinic and consultant oncologist. They all worked in conjunction with staff within the prison to deliver specialist care. This is positive.

32.20 There are wheelchair accessible cells in both Ailsa and Darroch Halls, with a hospital bed and an in‑cell accessible shower in the cell in Ailsa Hall. There is an accessible shower in the bottom flat of Darroch Hall near the disabled access cell.

STANDARD 33

Addictions are dealt with the way most likely to be effective and when they conflict, treatment takes priority over security measures as far as possible.

33.1 Prisoners can self‑refer or be referred to addictions services in the prison. The service is provided by addictions nurses, an alcohol liaison nurse and addictions support workers from the Enhanced Addictions Caseload Service (EACS). A range of interventions are available including individual therapeutic work, group programmes and pharmacological interventions. The EACS service became part of the NHS in 2013 with the service having previously been delivered under contract by Phoenix Futures. Services provided include recovery groups, alcohol awareness sessions, recovery cafe, harm reduction and pre‑release groups.

33.2 Evidence of joint working was observed, including meetings between addictions nurses and addictions support workers to discuss how they are supporting prisoners, however this could be improved. There appeared to be limited joint assessments undertaken. There were also opportunities for addictions nurses and an alcohol liaison nurse to be involved with some of the therapeutic programmes that were delivered, for example the recovery cafe or alcohol groups. There is a lack of an overall strategy within NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde to guide the provision of addictions services and to guide the working relationship between EACS and other addictions services within the prison. Staff were unable to identify the strategic lead for addictions services in the prison from NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

Recommendation 35: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that they develop an addictions strategy to guide the provision of addictions services within the prison.

33.3 Historically, there has not normally been a waiting list for the EACS service however at the time of the inspection they were one member of staff short with a prisoner waiting list numbering 47. This is a weakness.

33.4 There was evidence of joint working between addictions staff in the prison and staff within community settings. However due to the lack of an overall strategy this appears to be as a result of connections made by the staff within the prison through their own efforts as opposed to a proactive approach to addictions services in the prison by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

33.5 There is an issue of potential disparity concerning substitute prescribing. For example, a person who is prescribed Suboxone in the community prior to admission to HMP Greenock may continue with the regime following admission, however for those with no current community‑based prescription, this medication is not an option. Current protocol dictates that the prisoner will not be commenced on Suboxone even if deemed clinically appropriate. In the event where a prisoner is identified as being suitable to commence Suboxone, community‑based prescribing may be established from the day of liberation, with the prescription starting in prison approximately 7 to 10 days prior to liberation. This practice has the potential to be challenged by prisoners on the basis of not having equitable access to treatments, contradicting a person‑centred approach to healthcare. The issue is not unique to HMP Greenock and has been previously highlighted in inspection reports. The issue requires further debate at national level through the National Prisoner Healthcare Network and at local levels with senior representation from SPS and NHS.

33.6 In the event of a prisoner being unexpectedly liberated from court there are processes in place to ensure that their community prescriber is aware of their current prescription for replacement therapy. This is an area of good practice.

33.7 The EACS service work with throughcare staff from the local authority in the area the prisoner is returning to. They visit the prisoner while they are in custody to agree a care plan to address any further needs on release. Addictions nurses communicate with community‑based addictions staff to ensure that the replacement medication prisoners are prescribed in the prison will be continued in the community.

OUTCOME 9

Appropriate steps are taken to ensure that prisoners are integrated safely into the community and where possible into a situation less likely to lead to further crime.

Overview

Family Induction sessions are delivered weekly to families of newly admitted prisoners.

Family attendance at Integrated Case Management (ICM) case conferences although lower than the SPS national average, has increased slightly during 2013/14.

The prison has engaged with a wide range of partner agencies who support prisoners re-integrate into their communities post-release.

Monthly Risk Management Team (RMT) meetings are effective however occasional ad-hoc meetings to examine prisoner adverse developments are not subject to the review of a fully attended multi-disciplinary RMT meeting.

The Home Detention Curfew (HDC) Scheme is managed competently and efficiently.

STANDARD 34

The prison has a policy on links with families and with the local community and allocates staff time to implement it.

34.1 HMP Greenock provide weekly Family Induction sessions which offer the families of newly admitted prisoners the opportunity to meet with FCOs and discuss issues relating to all aspects of imprisonment. While this service is offered at the beginning of their time in custody, this initial engagement may lead to on‑going positive contact between prisoner and family and ultimately improved resettlement arrangements post release.

34.2 During the year 2013‑14 there has been an increase in the number of prisoners' families attending ICM case conferences in the prison. Although only a slight increase, it has brought HMP Greenock closer to the national average. This is encouraging.

34.3 Prisoners involved in a recent college‑run hairdressing programme were given the opportunity to invite members of their families into the prison to share in the celebration of the success of the training programme together with the college trainers and their families.

34.4 The prison has engaged with a range of partner agencies from the local community and further afield who regularly attend the prison and offer services to prisoners aimed at supporting them re-integrate into their communities post release. These include:

Table 6: Partner Agencies

ORGANISATION SERVICE
Inverclyde, West Dunbartonshire, Renfrewshire, Argyll and Bute and North Ayrshire Local Authorities Housing
Simon Community Housing
Tomorrow's Women (Glasgow) Social needs
New Routes Mentoring
Shine Mentoring
Circle Family issues
Alternatives (West Dumbarton Community Drug Service) Addictions
Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH) - Gateway to Services Mental Health
Rough Sleepers Initiative (RSI) Homelessness
Job Centre Plus Employment / Benefits advice
Glasgow Adult Literacy Link Project Literacy or numeracy issues
Big Plus (Inverclyde) Communication and numeracy issues
Inverclyde 'Moving-On' Project Addictions
Open Secret Childhood abuse including domestic abuse
Action for Children Life skills and training courses
Scottish Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Families Association (SSAFA) Support to serving and ex-armed forces personnel and their families including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) counselling

34.5 A volunteer protocol is in place in the prison. Voluntary work is undertaken predominately by faith‑based groups such as the Prison Fellowship who provide regular services in the prison including delivery of the Sycamore Programme. There is also an active group of volunteers who visit those prisoners who may otherwise have no contact with others outside the prison.

STANDARD 35

Arrangements are made for prisoners to leave with somewhere appropriate to live, healthcare, continuity assured, a chance to find work and build social links.

35.1 At the monthly RMT meeting observed by Inspectors a range of relevant stakeholders were represented. The discussions were related to the risks highlighted from the application of a valid risk assessment. The meeting was well‑chaired, providing the opportunity to process relevant information. Assurance was provided that the outcomes of the meeting were conveyed to prisoners either on the day of the meeting or the day after.

35.2 For prisoners housed in the NTE there are occasionally ad hoc meetings that examine cases where an adverse development has occurred. An examination of the documentation related to some recent ad hoc meetings suggests that recommendations made by the Officer responsible for completing the "Adverse Circumstance Report" was not subject to the review of a fully attended multidisciplinary RMT meeting. The Adverse Circumstance Reports examined by the Inspectors revealed that decisions were ratified by the Chairperson in a forum in which only a Manager was present. Furthermore, there was key information missing from the documentation; which included the name and date of the Officer/Manager who made the recommendation to the RMT and details of any immediate concerns raised by the adverse circumstance. There was little analysis of the adverse development in relation to formulation of risk presented by the prisoner. As a consequence there was limited consideration of the range of risk management strategies that could be applied in the particular case being examined.

Recommendation 36: HMP Greenock should ensure that all adverse development recommendations are processed at a fully attended multidisciplinary Risk Management Team meeting.

35.3 HMP Greenock has established a range of links with service providers including housing, employment, learning and substance misuse agencies. There are also links with services that provide prisoners on release opportunities to volunteer, as a platform to more economically viable employment. This is positive.

35.4 An opportunity to support desistance from substance misuse is provided by the facilitation of Recovery Cafes. This offers attendees who are on a recovery journey access to mutual support and the opportunity to develop tangible links with the community. This is positive.

35.5 HMP Greenock support several projects that contribute meaningfully to broader Scottish Government Criminal Justice outcomes. For example, Programme Facilitators assist in the delivery of interventions directed towards women and children who have witnessed or been subject to domestic violence. This work appears to contribute towards building the resilience of individuals who have faced adversity. In addition, the prison has Officers trained in the delivery of the White Ribbon Campaign. These awareness sessions promote broader attitudinal change in relation to violence against women. The contribution of the prison to promoting community resilience and broader attitudinal change is positive.

35.6 During the inspection it was apparent that Senior Managers were advocates of Personal Officers being actively involved in the management of prisoners from the beginning of their custody to the end, and beyond. The latter is supported by Throughcare Support Officers (TSOs) who will facilitate some of the outcomes of the Community Integration Plans generated in the prison and provide practical support for those released into the community. It is recognised that this approach has the potential to enhance the value and impact the efforts Personal Officers make. This is positive.

35.7 The Home Detention Curfew (HDC) Scheme is co‑ordinated by an administrator who compiles a dossier for Senior Manager authorisation. The process is run competently and efficiently; applying processes that proactively search the population for those eligible and which systematically gathers appropriate information. The administrator routinely initiates the sending of an information pack from the organisation "Families Outside" to family members of potential HDC candidates. This provides them with information and the contact details for sources of support, as well as introducing other services that may assist the family to help reintegrate the prisoner. This is an area of good practice.

Recommendations

PART 1: SAFETY

STANDARD 1

Prisoners are safe at all times; while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.

Recommendation 1: HMP Greenock should ensure that prisoners are supervised when providing a urine sample for the purposes of drug screening. (Paragraph 1.4)

Recommendation 2: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that all prisoners are medically assessed by a doctor within 24 hours of having been admitted from court. (Paragraph 1.5)

Recommendation 3: HMP Greenock should ensure that all injuries noted during the admission process are recorded and the prisoner asked to explain how the injuries occurred. (Paragraph 1.8)

Recommendation 4: HMP Greenock should ensure Prisoner Escort Record forms are passed to relevant function within the prison. (Paragraph 1.10)

Recommendation 5: HMP Greenock should ensure that basic information about what will happen to them and the routines of the prison is given to prisoners on admission in a language they can understand. (Paragraph 1.15)

Recommendation 6: HMP Greenock should ensure that prisoners in Chrisswell House are not subjected to any form of abuse from other prisoners. (Paragraph 1.20)

Recommendation 7: HMP Greenock should ensure that documentation and guidance for use in emergency situations is up‑to‑date. (Paragraph 1.28)

Recommendation 8: HMP Greenock should ensure that there is an appropriate gender balance allotted to every shift in order to manage emergency situations involving female prisoners. (Paragraph 1.29)

Recommendation 9: HMP Greenock should ensure that sufficient First Aid cover is available and appropriately deployed during patrol and Night Duty periods. (Paragraph 1.32)

STANDARD 2

Force is only used as a last resort and then strictly according to law and procedures.

Recommendation 10: HMP Greenock should ensure that all planned removals are recorded. (Paragraph 2.4)

Recommendation 11: HMP Greenock should ensure that all Control and Restraint removal documentation is fully completed. (Paragraph 2.5)

STANDARD 3

Prisoners are protected from violence and harm by other prisoners.

Recommendation 12: HMP Greenock should review their searching arrangements for female and National Top End prisoners. (Paragraph 3.5)

STANDARD 4

Security levels for individuals are no higher than is necessary to meet the risk presented by the prisoner.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 5

Procedures for deciding security levels are as transparent as is compatible with the sensitivities of the decision.

No recommendations.

PART 2: DECENCY, HUMANITY AND RESPECT FOR LEGAL RIGHTS

OUTCOME 2

Prisoners are treated with respect for their dignity while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.

STANDARD 6

The standards that apply to the treatment of prisoners in prison extend to all other places where they are held.

No recommendations.

OUTCOME 3

Prisoners are held in conditions that provide the basic necessities of life and health, including adequate air, light, water, exercise in the fresh air, food, bedding and clothing.

STANDARD 7

The accommodation is clean and provides a reasonable amount of space for each prisoner, with space for personal belongings, ventilation, a reasonable temperature, natural light.

Recommendation 13: HMP Greenock should review their response to the effects of dampness in areas of the prison. (Paragraph 7.3)

Recommendation 14: HMP Greenock should ensure all prisoners in Ailsa Hall are issued with the combination for their in-cell safes. (Paragraph 7.5)

Recommendation 15: HMP Greenock should provide prisoners with an appropriate light source to enable them to see and move around safely in their cells during the hours of darkness. (Paragraph 7.7)

Recommendation 16: HMP Greenock should ensure that beds fitted in Darroch Hall can be used safely by all prisoners. (Paragraph 7.13)

Recommendation 17: HMP Greenock should remove all storage items out with the original cell design and provide prisoners with sufficient, appropriate storage facilities. (Paragraph 7.20)

Recommendation 18: HMP Greenock should ensure all prisoners in Chrisswell House are provided with a lockable storage facility. (Paragraph 7.21)

STANDARD 8

Prisoners are allowed into the open air for at least one hour a day every day.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 9

Personal clothing is in decent condition, washed frequently and fits.

Recommendation 19: HMP Greenock should ensure that all prisoners have access to clean towels at such intervals that ensure they can maintain standards of personal cleanliness. (Paragraph 9.5)

STANDARD 10

Bedding is supplied and laundered at frequent intervals.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 11

Sanitary arrangements take account of health, hygiene and human dignity.

Recommendation 20: HMP Greenock should ensure that all prisoners can access a shower on a daily basis. (Paragraph 11.3)

Recommendation 21: HMP Greenock should ensure that all in‑cell lavatories are enclosed so as to ensure privacy. (Paragraph 11.7)

Recommendation 22: HMP Greenock should ensure that all showers operate effectively at the proper temperature and pressure. (Paragraph 11.12)

STANDARD 12

Food is adequate for health, varied and religiously and culturally appropriate.

Recommendation 23: HMP Greenock should ensure that all prisoners are provided with food which they can eat during the gap between the last meal served on Saturday and the first meal served on Sunday. (Paragraph 12.13)

OUTCOME 4

Prisoners are treated with respect by prison staff.

STANDARD 13

Respect is the underlying basis of all interactions between staff and prisoners.

No recommendations

STANDARD 14

Security measures such as searching are carried out with regard to the protection of human dignity.

No recommendations.

OUTCOME 5

Good contact with family and friends is maintained

STANDARD 15

Family visits are given high priority in terms of frequency, length and quality and are not restricted as part of any disciplinary or control process.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 16

Visitors are well treated

No recommendations.

STANDARD 17

Visits take place in the most relaxed environment compatible with security.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 18

Telephone contact is made as easy as possible.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 19

Letter contact is made as easy as possible.

No recommendations.

OUTCOME 6

Prisoners' entitlements are accorded them in all circumstances without facing difficulty.

STANDARD 20

Staff are aware of their duty of care to give prisoners their legal rights. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy and meet their obligations under it promptly.

Recommendation 24: HMP Greenock should ensure written information regarding prisoners legal rights and other relevant information is issued to prisoners on admission or transfer to HMP Greenock. (Paragraph 20.2)

STANDARD 21

Staff are aware of their duty to observe the Human Rights of prisoners. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 22

Staff are aware of their duty to treat prisoners in accordance with fairness and natural justice. They know what this involves. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

Recommendation 25: HMP Greenock should explore the low number of complaints made and the reasons behind this. (Paragraph 22.5)

STANDARD 23

Segregation is used sparingly and in accordance with procedures.

No recommendations.

PART 3: OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF‑IMPROVEMENT AND ACCESS TO SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES

OUTCOME 7

Prisoners take part in activities that educate, develop skills and personal qualities and prepare them for life outside prison.

STANDARD 24

The regime of the prison encourages prisoners to make the most of their time there and to exercise responsibility.

Recommendation 26: HMP Greenock should ensure that expected timescales for all the components of the Integrated Case Management process are met timeously so that it does not undermine potential outcomes. (Paragraph 24.9)

STANDARD 25

A full day's out of cell activities, such as work, education, leisure and cultural pursuits, is available for seven days of the week.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 26

The programme of work and related training focuses on equipping prisoners for employment on release.

Recommendation 27: HMP Greenock should ensure that prisoners work and training opportunities are not unduly impacted on by staff absences. (Paragraph 26.2)

STANDARD 27

A broad and relevant education programme is available.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 28

A range of interventions is in place to encourage prisoners to address those behaviours which may contribute to their offending.

Recommendation 28: HMP Greenock should ensure that they undertake an analysis of aggregated programme needs so that their programme delivery accurately reflects their populations aggregated risk/ needs profile. (Paragraph 28.3)

Recommendation 29: HMP Greenock should ensure that they regularly review their populations programmes lists from the Prison Records System to provide assurance that prisoners resident at HMP Greenock have equitable access to group work programmes. (Paragraph 28.4)

Recommendation 30: HMP Greenock should ensure that Personal Officers are aware of the range of available programmes to make sure that referrals for Generic Programmes Assessments are made to Programme Facilitators for those individuals who may benefit from group work interventions. (Paragraph 28.5)

STANDARD 29

There is a programme of cultural and voluntary activities.

Recommendation 31: HMP Greenock should ensure that the prisoners' library provides a wider range of textbooks and DVDs. (Paragraph 29.3)

Recommendation 32: HMP Greenock should ensure that prisoners have increased access to the library. (Paragraph 29.5)

STANDARD 30

Opportunities to practise their religion are available to all prisoners.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 31

Suitable arrangements to enable prisoners to buy a range of personal and other items that meet prisoners' needs are in place and available and accessible as necessary.

No recommendations.

OUTCOME 8

Healthcare is provided to the same standards as in the community outside prison, available in response to need, with a full range of preventative services, promoting continuity with health services outside prison

STANDARD 32

Health services of a high quality are available to all who need them.

Recommendation 33: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that prisoners have access to routine dental appointments to ensure dental services are provided to the same standard as in the community. (Paragraph 32.8)

Recommendation 34: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that confidential information is appropriately managed. (Paragraph 32.11)

STANDARD 33

Addictions are dealt with the way most likely to be effective and when they conflict, treatment takes priority over security measures as far as possible.

Recommendation 35: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that they develop an addictions strategy to guide the provision of addictions services within the prison. (Paragraph 33.2)

OUTCOME 9

Appropriate steps are taken to ensure that prisoners are integrated safely into the community and where possible into a situation less likely to lead to further crime.

STANDARD 34

The prison has a policy on links with families and with the local community and allocates staff time to implement it.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 35

Arrangements are made for prisoners to leave with somewhere appropriate to live, healthcare, continuity assured, a chance to find work and build social links.

Recommendation 36: HMP Greenock should ensure that all adverse development recommendations are processed at a fully attended multidisciplinary Risk Management Team meeting. (Paragraph 35.2)

Good Practice

PART 1: SAFETY

Good Practice 1: An alcohol liaison nurse is employed within the healthcare team. As part of the admission process an additional screening is undertaken to identify those prisoners who have specific problems with excessive alcohol intake and where appropriate, refer them to the alcohol liaison service for further input. This is an area of good practice. (Paragraph 1.3)

Good Practice 2: When prisoners are transferred out of HMP Greenock to other establishments, healthcare staff ensure that a transfer letter and the prisoners' medical records and prescriptions accompany them. This transfer letter details all on‑going health problems, current treatments and outstanding appointments. This is an area of good practice. (Paragraph 1.7)

PART 2: DECENCY, HUMANITY AND RESPECT FOR LEGAL RIGHTS

Good Practice 3: As the Darroch Hall PT session takes place directly after the evening meal, many of those attending choose not to eat at this time, preferring instead to wait until they have completed their training. Those that choose to do this, inform the Catering staff who provide them with a salad which they can eat in their residential accommodation following their training. This is an area of Good Practice. (Paragraph 12.10)

PART 3: OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF‑IMPROVEMENT AND ACCESS TO SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES

Good Practice 4: If Officers have any concerns that a prisoner is under the influence of illicit substances they will refer them to a member of the healthcare staff who will then meet with the prisoner concerned. A local protocol has been developed to manage this. Healthcare staff will test the prisoner's urine for any illicit substances and will carry out a set of physical observations. If they have concerns about the prisoner they will instruct officers to place the prisoner on increased observation levels. This is an area of good practice. (Paragraph 32.13)

Good Practice 5: Only one prisoner has had to be transferred to a mental health setting in the 12 months prior to the inspection. This was for the purposes of evaluation rather than as a result of being acutely unwell. If prisoners do require to be transferred this can be arranged quickly as the Consultant Psychiatrist who covers the prison is available for emergency referrals and where necessary is able to admit prisoners to the local mental health hospital. There are systems in place to access consultant input if the prison psychiatrist is not available. This is an area of good practice. (Paragraph 32.14)

Good Practice 6: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde have appointed a learning disability liaison nurse who works across all three SPS establishments in the health board area. The main purpose of the role initially is to scope what services there are for people with learning disability in the prisons. A pilot to screen for learning disability when prisoners are admitted has just finished. Those screened as having a potential learning disability were seen for further assessment by the learning disability liaison nurse. This is an area of good practice. (Paragraph 32.17)

Good Practice 7: In the event of a prisoner being unexpectedly liberated from court there are processes in place to ensure that their community prescriber is aware of their current prescription for replacement therapy. This is an area of good practice. (Paragraph 33.6)

Good Practice 8: The Home Detention Curfew (HDC) scheme is co‑ordinated by an administrator who compiles a dossier for Senior Manager Authorisation. The process is run competently and efficiently; applying processes that proactively search the population for those eligible and which systematically gathers appropriate information. The administrator routinely initiates the sending of an information pack from the organisation "Families Outside" to family members of potential HDC candidates. This provides them with information and the contact details for sources of support, as well as introducing other services that may assist the family help reintegrate the prisoner. This is an area of good practice. (Paragraph 35.7)

Inspection Team

David Strang, HM Chief Inspector of Prisons

Margaret Brown, Deputy Chief Inspector of Prisons

Tony Martin, Inspector of Prisons

Peter Connelly, Education Scotland

John Bowditch, Education Scotland

Gillian Walker, Guest Inspector, Scottish Prison Service

Naveel Saleemi, Guest Inspector, Scottish Prison Service

Gareth Marr, Healthcare Improvement Scotland

Ray Jones, Care Inspectorate

Acronyms

ABS Anti-Bullying Strategy

ACT 2 Care Scottish Prison Service suicide prevention strategy

APVS Assisted Prison Visiting Scheme

BICS British Institute of Cleaning Sciences

C&R Control and Restraint

CCTV Close Circuit Television

CIP Community Integration Plans

CJA Community Justice Authority

CSRA Cell Sharing Risk Assessment

EACS Enhanced Additions Caseload Service

ECR Electronic Control Room

ECS Electronic Care Summary

FCO Family Contact Officer

FLM First Line Manager

FNC First Night Centre

HDC Home Detention Curfew

ICM Integrated Case Management

IMU Intelligence Management Unit

LIM Local Incident Management

NPA National Progression Awards

NTE National Top-End

PAF Prisoner Appeal Form

PBSW Prison Based Social Worker

PCF Prisoner Complaint Form

PER Prisoner Escort Record

PIAC Prisoner Information Action Committee

PLO Police Liaison Officer

PR2 Prisoner Records Version 2

PSS Prisoner Supervision System

PT Physical Training

PTI Physical Training Instructor

PTSD Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

RMT Risk Management Team

RSI Rough Sleepers Initiative

SAMH Scottish Association for Mental Health

SCQF Scottish Credit and Qualification Framework

SEL Special Escorted Leave

SPIN Scottish Prisons Information Network

SPS Scottish Prison Service

SPSO Scottish Public Services Ombudsman

SQA Scottish Qualifications Authority

SROBP Substance Related Offending Behaviour Programme

SRU Separation and Reintegration Unit

SSAFA Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Families Association

SVQ Scottish Vocational Qualification

TSO Throughcare Support Officer

VC Visiting Committee

VISION NHS electronic patient record