Report on HMP Low Moss - Full Inspection 13-21 May 2013

Executive Summary

This report sets out the main findings and recommendations from the inspection of HMP Low Moss conducted between 13 and 21 May 2013. The 'new' HMP Low Moss is a brand new prison build on the site of the previous one which closed in May 2007. It has been open since March 2012 and provides along with other recently re-developed sites some of the best accommodation in the prison. Overall, this is a good and positive report on HMP Low Moss.

ISBN 978 1 78256 894 0
DPPAS 14740

This document is also available in pdf format (395KB)

Contents

Covering Letter

Introduction and Background

Key Facts

HMCIPS' Overview

PART 1: Safety

PART 2: Decency, humanity and respect for legal rights

PART 3: Opportunities for self-improvement and access to services and activities

Recommendations

Good Practice

Inspection Team

Covering Letter

The Scottish Ministers

In accordance with my Terms of Reference as HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland, I present a report of the full inspection carried out at HMP Low Moss between 13-21 May 2013.

The report makes a number of recommendations. It also highlights areas of good practice.

DAVID STRANG
HM Chief Inspector of Prisons

September 2013

Note: The Inspection was undertaken by a team led by Hugh Monro CBE, who at the time of publishing the report had demitted office and David Strang had been appointed to the role effective from 16 June 2013.

Introduction and Background

HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland (HMCIPS) assesses the quality of prisons in Scotland against a set of Standards. These Standards are set out in the document "Standards Used in the Inspection of Prisons in Scotland" which can be found at www.hmips.gov.uk.

The Standards reflect the independence of the inspection of prisons in Scotland and are designed to provide information to prisoners, prison staff and the wider community on the main areas that are examined during the course of an inspection.

The Standards provide assurance to Ministers and the public that inspections are conducted in line with a framework that is consistent and that assessments are made against appropriate criteria.

While the basis for these Standards is rooted in international human rights treaties and conventions and in prison rules, they are the Standards of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Prisons for Scotland (HMIPS).

This report reflects the Standards and has three main sections:

  1. Safety: security, good order, protection of prisoners from harm;
  2. Decency, humanity and respect for legal rights: all aspects of the treatment of prisoners and the framework of rights within which imprisonment should operate; and
  3. Opportunities for self-improvement and access to services and activities: the activities provided by the prison, the ethos, measures taken to solve the problems that led the prisoner into crime, preparation for release and social reintegration.

HMIPS gathers together information to enable assessments to be arrived at. A number of different techniques are used to do this. These techniques include:

  • obtaining information and documents from the Scottish Prison Service (SPS) and the prison being inspected;
  • shadowing and observing Prison Service and other specialist staff as they perform their duties within the prison;
  • interviewing prisoners and staff on a one‑to‑one basis;
  • conducting focus groups with prisoners and staff;
  • observing prison services as they are delivered;
  • inspecting facilities;
  • attending and observing relevant meetings; and
  • reviewing policies, procedures and other documents including performance reports.

HMIPS is supported in our work by inspectors from Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS) and Education Scotland.

The information that we gather enables us to obtain a full picture of the prison. This enables us to ensure that our assessments are fair, balanced and accurate.

This report outlines where Standards are being met and where they are not. It identifies where improvements are required. Where improvements are needed, the report makes appropriate recommendations. The report also highlights areas of the establishment which are to be commended and are listed as good practice.

Key Facts

Location

Her Majesty's Prison Low Moss is situated north of Bishopbriggs, East Dunbartonshire.

Role

HMP Low Moss provides 700 cells as well as facilities to help prisoners address their reoffending and re-integrate back into the community on their release from prison. It holds adult male convicted and remand prisoners primarily from the North Strathclyde Community Justice Authority area.

Design Capacity/Population held at time of Inspection

Clyde House has 284 single occupancy cells, 36 double occupancy cells, three single occupancy cells adapted for disabled access and four single occupancy safer cells for prisoners who pose a threat of self‑harm.

Kelvin House has 326 single occupancy cells, 48 double occupancy cells, three single occupancy cells adapted for disabled access and four single occupancy safer cells for prisoners who pose a threat of self-harm.

Lomond House has 12 single occupancy cells for prisoners who require to be out with normal circulation.

At the time of the inspection the prison held 101 untried prisoners and 602 convicted prisoners of which 260 were serving long term sentences of four years or more.

Brief History

The site that HMP Low Moss stands on started out as an RAF barrage balloon station at the beginning of the Second World War. After the war, RAF Bishopbriggs was used by the Royal Military Police as a training school. In 1968 the site was converted into a temporary low security prison, HMP Low Moss. The original HMP Low Moss accommodated up to 327 prisoners in mainly dormitory accommodation much of which was in the form of wooden buildings. The prison was closed in May 2007. The buildings were subsequently demolished and the site cleared ready for a new prison to be built. Construction started on the site in February 2010. The new HMP Low Moss opened in March 2012 and can accommodate up to 784 prisoners.

Accommodation

There are two main accommodation areas in HMP Low Moss, Clyde and Kelvin House. In addition there is a Separation and Reintegration Unit: Lomond House. Clyde House has 284 cells designed for single occupancy and 36 cells designed for double occupancy. Kelvin House has 326 cells designed for single occupancy and 48 cells designed for double occupancy. Lomond House has 12 cells, all of which are of single occupancy design. Each cell has an integral toilet and shower.

Healthcare Provider

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

Learning Provider

Motherwell College

HM Chief Inspector's Overview

Setting the Scene

HMP Low Moss is built on the site of the old prison which closed in May 2007. The new prison has been open since March 2012. In selecting and integrating a whole new staffing complement, taken from either other establishments or by direct recruitment to the SPS and shaping them to run a prison is a major achievement. I congratulate management and prison staff on achieving this safely and successfully.

The 'new' HMP Low Moss is a brand new prison and provides along with other recently re-developed sites some of the best accommodation in the prison estate. The majority of cells are for single occupancy and each cell has a shower and toilet, providing a greatly improved and much more hygienic way of managing prisoners.

Inspection of HMP Low Moss

In previous reports my predecessor has commented on having a computerised prisoner management system fitted at redeveloped Scottish Prison Service sites, along the lines of the 'kiosk' system at HMPs Addiewell and Kilmarnock. I note that this has not been fitted at HMP Low Moss. Whilst prisoner management and activity has been better timetabled, there are a number of recommendations on improvements that could be made.

For HMP Low Moss to be functioning well given it has only been up and running for just over a year is a considerable achievement. It is a safe prison, a statement which should not be underestimated given that this is a brand new prison with no existing culture to rely on. Staff/prisoner relationships are good and go a long way to making the prison stable. A clear positive HMP Low Moss culture has been developed and appears embedded in the day‑to‑day running of the establishment.

Strong links have been fostered with the local community, of particular note was that with the local Scout/Cub Group which run activity nights at the prison which prisoners' children can get involved. I was also impressed with the ethos of the delivery of the throughcare service in place via a Public Social Partnership (PSP) which has been funded over the next three years by the Scottish Government and The Robertson Trust. HMP Low Moss will work with the voluntary sector local consortium led by Turning Point and the Community Justice Authorities. The core principle of the PSP is the timely delivery of individualised and responsive prisoner support before, during and after liberation. This is to be commended and it will be interesting to see how successful this integrated approach will be.

Family access at HMP Low Moss appears to be a positive experience and visits take place in a very constructive environment. Of particular note are the dedicated children's visits which encourage and develop positive parenting skills for fathers and is an area of good practice which should be replicated where appropriate across the Scottish Prison Service.

HMP Low Moss aims to provide prisoners with 35 hours of purposeful activity per week. Whilst this is not delivered for all prisoners, it is the highest level within SPS public sector prisons of purposeful activity achieved. This is to be commended.

Summary

Overall, this is a good and positive report on HMP Low Moss. I am particularly impressed with the links that have been fostered with local groups and the community. Access to purposeful activity and visits also deserve to be singled out for praise. A clear positive culture and can do attitude has been created and bought into by both staff and managers. This has all been achieved in a relatively short time and is testimony to the vision and ethos of the management team and staff.

I congratulate the Governor and his team on what has been achieved to date.

PART 1: SAFETY

OUTCOME 1

Appropriate steps are taken to ensure that individual prisoners are protected from harm by themselves and others.

STANDARD 1

Prisoners are safe at all times; while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.

1.1 The Reception is situated adjacent to the Health Centre which facilitates good communication and efficient response times from Healthcare staff.

1.2 There is an effective process in place within Reception to provide all new prisoners arriving at HMP Low Moss with a thorough health screen. The quality of care, clinical considerations and engagement with prisoners by healthcare staff was observed and found to be delivered in a professional manner. A Healthcare information booklet is available to prisoners on admission.

1.3 All prisoners are assessed for drug and alcohol related issues and referred to specialist services as appropriate. A similar service is also in place for those prisoners presenting with mental health issues.

1.4 Prisoners are interviewed in private and in a confidential manner. Medical assessments are conducted quickly and effectively. Medical records are accessed both electronically and from paper‑based medical notes which arrive with the prisoner (if transferred from another establishment) on admission. Where no current medical record exists, one is established at the point of assessment. Information is entered in to the NHS electronic patient records system, VISION.

1.5 Prisoners are observed by operational staff during a strip search procedure in Reception. If injuries are viewed, this is reported to the assessing healthcare professional who in discussion with the prisoner asks for, and records the nature of the injury and how they occurred. Additional information regarding on-going treatment is sought from medical notes and Prisoner Escort Record (PER) forms.

1.6 The assessing healthcare professional ascertains if there is any perceived risk of harm to self or others. This clinical decision is made through interviewing the prisoner, accessing information from medical records, PER forms and PR2 (SPS Prisoner Record database) information.

1.7 Operational staff assesses risk using the Act2Care (suicide and self-harm prevention strategy) and documentation and respond accordingly. Information is then relayed to healthcare staff prior to the commencement of a health assessment. This is a good process, with relevant information being communicated between Healthcare and Operations staff. Where risk is identified, action is taken to ensure the safety of the individual and others is maintained. This is positive.

1.8 All admissions or prisoners returning from court arrive with a warrant and other relevant paperwork which is checked by a Reception Officer who confirms the index offence, sentence length, etc. Any details that suggest the prisoner may be at risk of harm from others or self‑harm are fully discussed and appropriate action taken.

1.9 A PER form accompanies all prisoners entering the prison. These forms provide details of potential enemies, issues of self‑harm and a record of the prisoner's custody while under escort. Issues highlighted on the PER form are discussed with the prisoner during the admission interview process.

1.10 Prisoners who can understand, speak and read English are provided with a full explanation of the routines of the prison and what will happen to them.

1.11 There is signage displayed in Reception in a number of languages to allow prisoners whose first language is not English to identify the language they speak. HMP Low Moss has a contract with an interpretation service for prisoners who cannot speak English. This service can be accessed immediately by telephone or an interpreter may attend in person. The contact details for the service are held within Reception and Officers spoken with confirmed they knew how to access it.

1.12 Officers from the First Night in Custody (FNIC) and Positive Impact Programme (PIP) Units confirmed they can access the translation services when required in order to support the interview process.

1.13 The induction booklet is only provided in English and when issuing it, the Officers do not confirm that the prisoner can read.

Recommendation 1: HMP Low Moss should provide written information for prisoners in a number of languages other than English.

Recommendation 2: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners can read the written information issued to them.

1.14 New admissions to HMP Low Moss are either located in the FNIC Unit in Kelvin House (level 1) or the PIP Unit in Clyde House (level 1). The process for new admissions to both the FNIC and PIP Units was observed and found to provide a safe introduction into prison life. When a prisoner is allocated to the FNIC Unit, an Officer from that area attends Reception and meets with the prisoner to provide an explanation of the regime, an indication of what he should expect and an information booklet. However the print quality of the booklet is very poor and large parts are illegible. This is a weakness. Once the Officer takes the prisoner to the FNIC, a further explanation of the more practical aspects of the residential regime is given such as the use of the intercom system, etc. Starting this process out with the residential area in Reception is positive as confidentiality is ensured, the environment allows the prisoner to be more relaxed and the Officer is free from the usual distractions of the house block. This is good practice.

1.15 When a prisoner is allocated to the PIP Unit, an Officer and a 'prisoner mentor' from that area attend the Reception. This is good practice. In the first instance the prisoner mentor explains how the programme works and what is expected. While it is very positive to involve a prisoner mentor in this process, during observation the mentor was unable to provide basic information or answer some of the questions asked by the prisoner. This process would be improved if the mentor had been more knowledgeable to enable the questions asked to be answered. The Officer then interviews the prisoner and provides him with information in relation to the PIP, before escorting him to the PIP Unit where the more practical aspects of the regime are explained. This mirrors the previous good practice item. Whether admitted to the FNIC or PIP Unit the prisoner signs a record to confirm he has received the relevant information.

1.16 All prisoners on admission to HMP Low Moss have the opportunity to use the telephone. There is a telephone located within Reception however this is seldom used. Instead, prisoners tend to use the telephone when they arrive in the residential area. Prisoners spoken with on the day after admission confirmed they had had the opportunity to use the telephone soon after leaving reception. Prisoners who are admitted without any money are provided with a 30 pence telephone credit to make an initial telephone call.

1.17 There are arrangements in place to ensure those who experience their first night in custody are supported. The PIP Unit provides accommodation for those who have not been in custody before. This unit provides a safe environment to allow the prisoner to adapt to his surroundings.

1.18 Those deemed to be at risk of self-harm are managed under the Act2Care strategy. The individual is housed in a suitable environment and observed and managed as determined by his individual care plan. Care plans accompany the prisoner at all times and are accessible by all staff who engage with the prisoner.

1.19 Prisoners who are identified on admission as being vulnerable or experiencing mental health problems, are assessed during the reception process and referred to the appropriate mental health service. Relevant information regarding their situation is recorded and relayed to residential staff prior to their initial allocation.

1.20 Special arrangements for those that need detoxification and symptomatic relief are in place. Prisoners are seen within 24 hours of admission by a Doctor where their medication is reviewed and appropriate specialist referrals are made. Symptomatic relief is routinely available in response to clinical need.

1.21 HMP Low Moss has comprehensive contingency plans for dealing with emergencies. These plans have been developed since the Operational Readiness Audit was undertaken in June 2012 by SPS Audit and Assurance Services. This audit provided the Governor with Reasonable Assurance.

1.22 An electronic version of the contingency plans is available on the establishment's SharePoint site and hard copies are appropriately located. Site Layouts and Aerial Photographs are up‑to‑date. Each contingency examined is set out as a Standard Operating Procedure in checklist format, version controlled and with a review date. This is an example of good practice.

1.23 The Inter Agency plan which has been developed in partnership with Police Scotland provides a clear and well laid out joint response to serious incidents and fully meets the requirements of the Police/SPS memorandum of understanding on the management of serious incidents. These plans are located appropriately. Managers are familiar with the plans and the Senior Management Team have access to them.

1.24 There are desk instructions kept in the Electronic Control Room (ECR) for dealing with immediate emergencies. Staff working in the ECR appear competent and confident in their use.

1.25 Training records inspected, detailed the staff who attend local and national incident training. These records include the latest local and national training events and details of the Local Incident Management (LIM) training week which was held in February 2013. Training in this area is up‑to‑date and well managed.

1.26 Each role-holder on the nightshift has a hard copy of the Nightshift Orders which are well laid out and informative. The night duty staff have a good understanding of their role and responsibilities and each has access to both a crash pack and first aid kit.

1.27 There is a thorough system for the checking of personal alarms, CCTV cameras and perimeter fence intrusive alarms. This is undertaken by night duty staff on a rolling basis, ensuring all equipment is regularly checked and tested. This is positive.

1.28 There is no specific 'pegging' system at HMP Low Moss. Officers carry personal alarms which record each time they pass a beacon sensor. It is noted that although the Managers are aware that the system records movements, they do not routinely access the records to ensure that staff are undertaking observations and completing the proper patrol routes.

Recommendation 3: HMP Low Moss should introduce a system which gives assurance that night patrol routes and observations are being undertaken properly.

1.29 At the time of the inspection, staff training records show that 35 staff were trained in First Aid. One Nightshift Manager is also a First Aid Instructor. Discussions with managers suggest that HMP Low Moss does not routinely ensure that appropriate numbers of staff rostered for nightshift and patrol shifts are competent in first aid.

Recommendation 4: HMP Low Moss should ensure that there is adequate first aid cover within the establishment at all times.

1.30 Fire related systems, plans and procedures are robust and well managed in HMP Low Moss. However at the time of inspection, only 67% of staff had attended Fire Awareness training. A well-structured plan for testing fire evacuations is in place. This is managed and co‑ordinated by the Heath and Fire Safety Co‑ordinator with testing taking place on a monthly basis. The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service regularly attend familiarisation visits.

Recommendation 5: HMP Low Moss should ensure fire awareness training targets are met.

1.31 Staff have a good understanding of fire procedures, including response and evacuation procedures. This is evident when speaking to Staff and Managers in Kelvin, Clyde and Lomond Houses. Each cell inspected had clear instructions on the back of the cell door and prisoners interviewed understand the procedures to be followed in the event of a fire. Fire equipment inspected is checked on a daily basis and is easily accessible. Fire signage inspected is appropriately displayed with emergency routes clearly identified. Overall the arrangements for staff and prisoners in the event of fire is satisfactory.

1.32 There is an emergency call button in each cell to allow prisoners to summon immediate assistance. There is also an intercom system which allows prisoners to talk to staff for non‑emergency matters. A number of these were checked in all residential areas and found to be in working order. Observation of daily cell checks within all residential areas confirmed emergency call buttons in each cell are checked on a daily basis.

1.33 Observation and discussion with staff and prisoners confirmed that emergency cell call buttons and the intercom system are answered quickly. This is evidenced through the interrogation of the computerised records. The computer system that records the usage of both systems is in working order within all residential areas and First Line Managers (FLMs) are able to retrospectively interrogate the system and download paper records as required.

1.34 All cell doors are fitted with an observation panel which is fit for purpose and provides Officers with a good level of observation within the cell.

1.35 A number of cells were checked throughout the prison and a high percentage of cell door observation panels were found to be blocked with makeshift paper covers. Many prisoners stated they did this to increase their privacy.

1.36 Staff reported that they remove any items blocking observation panels on a daily basis when conducting cell security checks. However observation of these security checks would point to this not always being the case.

Recommendation 6: HMP Low Moss should ensure cell door observation panels are not covered up.

1.37 A duty managers checklist and a night duty roster for Senior Manager are in place. Interrogation of records demonstrate that visits are recorded.

1.38 Information for families who wish to raise concerns about a prisoner is provided in the Visitors Information Booklet. Anecdotally, operations staff appear to have a good relationship with visitors and it is reported that visitors openly approach them if wishing to raise concerns about the safety or well-being of the prisoner they are visiting.

1.39 Families are invited to attend case conferences but low uptake is reported.

1.40 There are safer cells available for use by those prisoners deemed to be at risk of self-harm or suicide. Appropriate Act2Care plans and clinical care plans are in place. Pertinent levels of observations are in place for those deemed at risk of self‑harm or suicide.

1.41 A Mental Health Team review and case conference is arranged for every prisoner deemed to be at risk and managed under the Act2Care strategy.

1.42 Healthcare staff report that thoughts of low level self‑harm are under reported. This is concerning. The Healthcare manager is developing a prompt‑aid to assist operational staff to recognise and respond accordingly to those who may be at risk.

1.43 Recognised policy and protocols for the management of contagious diseases are in place and aligned with those of NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Healthcare staff are aware of the policies and can access the relevant documents on site.

1.44 Addiction services are in place. Appropriate clinical access and interventions are available for prisoners with addiction issues. Clinical drug testing is carried out on those prisoners engaged in a substitute prescribing regime.

STANDARD 2

Force is only used as a last resort and then strictly according to law and procedures.

2.1 Robust systems and procedures are in place for the management, storage and issue of handcuffs. All relevant paperwork was checked and found to be compliant. Assets confirmed against inventory are accurate and up-to-date.

2.2 Special Cells and mechanical restraints are available however neither had been used since the prison opened.

2.3 Procedures are in place for the video recording of planned Control and Restraint (C&R) removals. A video camera is located in Lomond House and a backup is located in the Intelligence Management Unit (IMU). It was noted that no planned removals had taken place.

2.4 All prisoners removed and relocated under restraint are seen by Healthcare staff. An examination of the related paperwork found them to be completed in accordance with SPS policy, however Section I of the Use of Force Reporting Form is not routinely completed by the Head of Operations.

Recommendation 7: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the Head of Operations completes Section I of the Use of Force Reporting Form.

2.5 A total of 50 removal forms were inspected, with threats of violence against staff followed by prisoner fights being the most common reason for removal.

2.6 Since 1 January 2013, two prisoner complaint (PCF2) forms have been submitted relating to allegations of staff assault. Both had been appropriately dealt with and investigated timeously. Any allegations of staff assault are referred to the police as a matter of course by the Intelligence Management Unit. An Incident Information Checklist is located in the IMU which details an overview of all incidents including those referred to the police. This is positive.

STANDARD 3

Prisoners are protected from violence and harm by other prisoners

3.1 HMP Low Moss has a Good Order Strategy Group which meets on a monthly basis and is chaired by the Governor. Membership includes the Deputy Governor, Unit Managers, Intelligence Manager and representation from Psychology and Healthcare functions. The strategy encompasses the violence reduction strategy and has been in place since June 2012. The standing agenda reviews all incidents of violence, concerted indiscipline and any instances of prisoner behaviour which are causing concern.

3.2 During the reporting period April 2012 to March 2013, there have been five incidents of concerted indiscipline. Most were related to some form of sit down protest. There were no serious prisoner on staff assaults and 10 minor/no injury assaults on staff. However during same period there were 15 serious prisoner on prisoner assaults and 140 minor/no injury assaults on prisoners.

3.3 Appropriate staffing levels are in place and deployed throughout the establishment to ensure good order is maintained. There are positive staff-prisoner relationships within HMP Low Moss. This is evidenced through observation, during staff and prisoner focus groups and in conversations with individual staff and prisoners. Despite shortages the staffing levels monitored over the course of the inspection are deemed to be managed effectively. The staff call in list in the Contingency Plans is up‑to‑date.

3.4 Most prisoners reported that they feel safe within HMP Low Moss.

3.5 In the main, relationships between staff and prisoners are positive and observation throughout the prison demonstrated staff and prisoners interacting freely with each other.

3.6 These positive relationships are especially evident in Clyde House which holds Long Term Prisoners. Some prisoners in Kelvin House, which holds remand and Short Term prisoners, stated they believe that relationships with staff are not as positive as they could be. Observation of staff/prisoner interaction in Kelvin House is, in some cases, less informal than that displayed in Clyde House, however it is none the less positive.

3.7 Prisoners spoken with in both house blocks confirm they approach staff if they have any issues or concerns.

3.8 There is evidence of action being taken as a result of prisoners expressing concerns for their personal safety. HMP Low Moss does not have a designated area within the prison to hold prisoners who require protection from other prisoners. However, on occasion, they are required to hold such individuals. These may be prisoners newly admitted to the establishment who, due to their index offence or issues in the external community, mean they require protection from other prisoners. Any such issues are normally highlighted and discussed during the Reception process. Such prisoners are held within the FNIC Unit until they can be transferred to another prison.

3.9 In addition, prisoners already in HMP Low Moss may highlight fears for their personal safety for various reasons. These prisoners are urged to highlight issues to Officers in the first instance. If the potential issues cannot be resolved at this stage the process is escalated to the FLM who will commence a formal paper‑based process, recording details of the situation, during which the prisoner will be held for a 72 hour period within their own cell to ensure their safety and allow further investigation into the potential threat. If, after this period, the potential threat still exists the prisoner may be moved to another location within HMP Low Moss or, if this is not possible, will be moved to the FNIC Unit until such times as they can be transferred to another prison.

3.10 At the time of the inspection, only two prisoners within the FNIC Unit fitted this criteria, however in the weeks prior to the inspection this number had reached as high as 17.

3.11 Prisoners requiring protection should not remain in the prison for a prolonged period prior to transfer, however there are no defined or agreed timescales to work to. This often causes delays due to HMP Low Moss having to contact other establishments to negotiate the transfer of these prisoners on an individual basis. While the steps taken by HMP Low Moss to ensure prisoners are safe at all times are positive, the regime for these 'protection' prisoners held in the FNIC Unit is poor in relation to other parts of the establishment, with limited access to exercise and recreation. This is a weakness.

3.12 The establishment does not use the SPS Anti-Bullying Strategy (ABS) to any great extent. This was confirmed by staff and prisoners. Instead, when bullying behaviour or intimidation is highlighted, any reported information is collated by the IMU and if sufficient evidence is available, the perpetrator may be removed from the area.

Recommendation 8: HMP Low Moss should ensure the Scottish Prison Service Anti-Bullying Strategy is implemented.

3.13 Cell Sharing Risk Assessments (CSRAs) are completed routinely as per policy and guidelines and associated desk instructions are available on SharePoint. There are 36 double cells available in Clyde House and 48 in Kelvin House. No prisoners have been routinely doubled up in Clyde House since the prison opened. The Business Improvement Manager produces a daily report to monitor any incomplete assessments or issues. During the inspection there were no outstanding issues. Managers and Staff have a good understanding of the CSRA process.

3.14 The process for the distribution of food does not allow prisoners working in the Cookhouse to know where the individual food containers are destined for. As such the possibility to tamper with food for any specific prisoner group is negligible.

3.15 HMP Low Moss has robust systems and processes in place for managing The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Scotland) Act 2000 (RIPSA). This is in line with SPS Policy and guidance. All documentation is stored securely. Managers and staff are trained in RIPSA and are competent to undertake their respective roles effectively.

3.16 There is sufficient clearly displayed CCTV signage around the establishment. The ECR officer on duty had a good understanding of directed surveillance and the use of the CCTV cameras. Guidelines and logs are in place, complete and up-to-date for general CCTV use. The Office of the Surveillance Commissioner (OSC) undertook an inspection of the full process at HMP Low Moss on the 13 March 2013 and noted that there were the full complement of documentation required to achieve compliance with RIPSA.

STANDARD 4

Security levels for individuals are no higher than is necessary to meet the risk presented by the prisoner.

4.1 The application of the Prisoner Supervision System (PSS) in HMP Low Moss is fair. In particular, risk factors are duly considered and representation from prisoners is taken into account. This ensures the review process is transparent and objective. Timescales however are not always met. At the time of the inspection there were 21 PSS reviews past their respective review dates of which 17 were over by five days with two over by 45 and 21 days respectively. When Managers were questioned about the latter two, there appeared to be some uncertainty about why this was the case and where the review forms were in the process. It appears that PSS reviews are sent directly to the Personal Officer and if they are absent from duty, this means no other officer will pick this up.

Recommendation 9: HMP Low Moss should ensure that all Prisoner Supervision System reviews are undertaken within the prescribed timeframes.

STANDARD 5

Procedures for deciding security levels are as transparent as is compatible with the sensitivities of the decision.

5.1 Prisoners are provided with information on the decision that has been taken on their PSS level. They are given an indication of how they can contribute to reducing this level. Of the PSS forms examined all prisoners had been informed and had signed the forms. There were no examples available of prisoners not being informed of the supervision outcomes.

5.2 The Managers explained the role of the Personal Officers and were content through case management, progression and Integrated Case Management (ICM) that prisoners would be given an understanding of how they could contribute to reducing the level of security applied. This was consistent with the sampled PSS forms which the prisoners had signed.

PART 2: DECENCY, HUMANITY AND RESPECT FOR LEGAL RIGHTS

OUTCOME 2

Prisoners are treated with respect for their dignity while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.

STANDARD 6

The standards that apply to the treatment of prisoners in prison extend to all other places where they are held.

6.1 This inspection only examined HMP Low Moss. It did not examine other locations where prisoners are held out with HMP Low Moss, for example, while under escort in transit vehicles on journeys to and from court or while detained in Courts.

6.2 Separate inspections on these locations have been carried out and have been published and are available on the HMIPS website at www.hmips.gov.uk.

OUTCOME 3

Prisoners are held in conditions that provide the basic necessities of life and health, including adequate air, light, water, exercise in the fresh air, food, bedding and clothing.

STANDARD 7

The accommodation is clean and provides a reasonable amount of space for each prisoner, with space for personal belongings, ventilation, a reasonable temperature, natural light.

7.1 There are two main accommodation areas in HMP Low Moss: Clyde and Kelvin House. In addition there is a Separation and Reintegration Unit: Lomond House. Clyde House has 284 cells designed for single occupancy and 36 cells designed for double occupancy. Kelvin House has 326 cells designed for single occupancy and 48 cells designed for double occupancy. Lomond House has 12 cells, all of which are of single occupancy design. In addition, each of the two main house blocks have three single occupancy cells adapted for disabled access and four single occupancy safer cells for prisoners who pose a risk of self-harm

7.2 All areas were opened in March 2012 meaning the accommodation in HMP Low Moss incorporates the latest Scottish Prison Service cell design. All cells have enough space to move around in and a chair and worktop space suitable to eat or write at commensurate with the number of prisoners it is designed to hold.

7.3 There is a small lockable (combination) safe for each prisoner fitted in every cell. There is no designated area to display photographs or other items. As such, a number of cells have items displayed on all walls and in some cases cover the entire wall space. Such items should be routinely removed by staff when they are conducting daily cell security checks, however many appear to have been in place for a considerable period of time. These additional items make the cell searching process more difficult and may increase the fire loading within the cell. In addition when these items are removed they have, in some cases, caused damage to the paintwork, meaning a number of cells already require redecoration. Considering these cells have only been opened 14 months, this is very disappointing.

Recommendation 10: HMP Low Moss should identify an appropriate area within cells for the display of photographs.

7.4 General storage within cells is poor with limited cupboard space. Only one under-bed storage box is provided per prisoner and there is no provision at all for hanging clothes or other items such as towels. This has resulted in improvised clothes hangers and storage items being made and fitted by prisoners in many cells, some of which have been manufactured in the industrial complex. This is common within both Clyde and Kevin House. These additional items make cell searching more problematic and where these items have been removed, the fabric of the wall has been damaged. Both staff and prisoners commented negatively on the lack of storage for clothing and personal items.

Recommendation 11: HMP Low Moss should remove all storage items out with the original cell design and provide prisoners with sufficient, appropriate storage facilities.

Recommendation 12: SPS should review the storage provision in the cellular design of all new prisons.

7.5 Cell windows do not open however vents on both sides of the window allow fresh air into the cell. The level of natural light in the cells is sufficient to read by. Each window has a blind fitted to allow the prisoner to control the amount of light that enters the cell.

7.6 Drinking water is available on a 24 hour basis within cells. There are also chilled water dispensers in each section of the residential areas which can be accessed during periods of unlock.

7.7 Cells are generally clean, however many appear cluttered with clothing and property due to the limited storage space available. There are cleaning cupboards stocked with suitable cleaning materials in each section. Prisoners have access to these cupboards and their contents during periods of unlock.

7.8 Communal areas including pantries, recreation areas and stairwells within residential house blocks are all clean due largely to the high number of prisoners employed to clean these areas.

7.9 External areas directly adjacent to Clyde, Kelvin and Lomond Houses are kept clean. As cell windows do not open, items cannot be thrown out. This is likely to be a contributory factor. External exercise areas are also clean and free from litter. In addition the level of cleanliness in the visit room, prisoner work areas, corridors and all other communal prison areas is high.

STANDARD 8

Prisoners are allowed into the open air for at least one hour a day every day.

8.1 Prisoners have access to at least one hour in the open air every day. With the exception of those prisoners located in the PIP Unit who can attend outside exercise between 9:00 am and 10:00 am, all prisoners in Clyde House and levels 2 and 3 of Kelvin House can attend outside exercise between 5:30 pm and 6:30 pm Monday to Friday inclusive. Prisoners in Kelvin House level 1 can attend outside exercise between 12:30 pm and 1:30 pm every weekday.

8.2 At the weekends, prisoners located in the PIP Unit and Level 1 of Kelvin House can attend outside exercise between 9:00 am and 10:00 am. Prisoners in Clyde House can attend between 10:30 am and 11:30 am or 2:15 pm and 3:15 pm. Prisoners in Levels 2 and 3 of Kelvin House can attend between 10:30 am and 11:30 am. Some prisoners in Kelvin House who receive daily medication report that they may not have access to a full hour of outside exercise at the weekend as medication is dispensed while exercise is taking place and they are required to remain in the house block until they receive their medication. This is a weakness.

8.3 Some prisoners expressed a very negative view of the early evening exercise period preferring the more traditional time around lunch. Management confirmed the timing of the exercise period is scheduled to maximise access to purposeful activity.

8.4 Prisoners in Lomond House access time in the open air within one of three secure areas on a rotational basis. Dependent on the number of prisoners held, the duration varies with a minimum of one hour and a maximum of up to two hours. Waterproof jackets are available for use for every prisoner in Lomond House.

8.5 Clyde and Kelvin House both have a secure hard surfaced area adjacent to the house block where prisoners take exercise. During the inspection all sessions, specifically the lunchtime session for prisoners in Kelvin House level 1, were reasonably well attended, especially on days when the weather was good.

8.6 Both main house blocks have a five‑a‑side football pitch. A larger football field is available for use by both house blocks on a rotational basis. Throughout the inspection Officers qualified to deliver sports and games, facilitated football matches on a regular basis in the evenings. This provision is in addition to activities facilitated by Physical Training (PT) Instructors. These additional sessions are well attended and viewed in a very positive manner by prisoners and staff. This is an area of good practice.

8.7 Prisoners in Clyde and Kelvin House can wear their own clothing during the period of time they spend in the open air. There is an adequate stock of communal waterproof clothing available to prisoners for use in inclement weather. However there are no designated drying areas within the house blocks; wet jackets are stored in boxes.

Recommendation 13: HMP Low Moss should ensure suitable areas for drying clothing used by prisoners accessing time in the open air are provided.

STANDARD 9

Personal clothing is in decent condition, washed frequently and fits.

9.1 Each prisoner in HMP Low Moss is given one pair of denims, one tee-shirt and one sweatshirt in reception and then supplied with a further, similar set on admission to their allocated house block. This clothing issued to prisoners is sufficient and of decent quality. The exception to this is the tee-shirts which, due to the poor quality of the fabric, do not retain their shape or size after laundering. This has resulted in prisoners who normally wear size medium, for example, having to wear size extra-large, such is the change in shape after the garment is washed. The demand for bigger sizes outstrips supply and as a result many prisoners have to wear ill-fitting tee-shirts.

Recommendation 14: HMP Low Moss should ensure that a sufficient stock of better quality tee-shirts for issue to prisoners is procured and maintained.

9.2 Kit (clothing) stores located in each of the main house blocks are tidy and well stocked. Management of prisoner kit (clothing) is delivered well.

9.3 Prisoners may opt to wear their own clothing within the house blocks and can access these items from their personal property or request to have clothing brought in from home. They may also purchase items of personal clothing via a recognised procurement route with money from their private cash account.

9.4 Prisoners held in segregation in Lomond House have access to only prison clothing, with the exception of underwear and footwear.

9.5 Laundering arrangements for both prison issue and personal clothing are good. The laundry operates Monday to Friday every week and prisoners can send their clothing to be laundered on a daily basis in two specially designed laundry bags; one bag designated for light and one for dark coloured items. Many prisoners however choose to wash their underwear in their in-cell sinks rather than send it to the laundry.

9.6 Those prisoners who expressed a view said that they trust the laundry service in HMP Low Moss and indeed there is little evidence of prisoners making formal complaints about the quality of the laundry system. Similarly, there are few recorded instances of clothing being lost or damaged in the laundry. This may, in part, be due to the laundry process in place which ensures all filled laundry bags are sealed and the seal number recorded in the house block prior to being sent to the laundry. The laundry officer then confirms and records that the bag and seal are intact prior to and after the laundering is complete. This is an area of good practice.

STANDARD 10

Bedding is supplied and laundered at frequent intervals.

10.1 Bed linen and mattresses issued to prisoners in HMP Low Moss were all new when the prison opened and remain fit for purpose and in good condition. All prisoners are issued with two sets of freshly laundered bedding on arrival and have frequent opportunities to change their bedding as required. They may send their bedding items to the laundry any evening from Sunday to Thursday inclusive. Many longer-term prisoners have chosen to purchase their own bedding items. Access to the laundry for prisoners' own bedding is exactly the same as for prison‑issue bedding. Similarly, many prisoners have opted to buy their own pillows due to the poor quality of the prison issue pillows. These pillows, procured through a service‑wide, central contract, are very uncomfortable and not fit for purpose.

Recommendation 15: SPS should review the specification of their contract for the procurement of pillows for prisoners' use when it is renewed in April 2014.

10.2 An adequate supply of bed linen, pillows and mattresses is held in the house block stores. Staff confirmed that replacements are issued on a one‑to‑one basis for those items that need to be condemned as a result of damage or wear and tear.

STANDARD 11

Sanitary arrangements take account of health, hygiene and human dignity.

11.1 There is a wash hand basin, lavatory and shower in each cell, meaning prisoners have 24‑hour access to these facilities.

11.2 The lavatory and shower are located in a small fully enclosed 'wet room', ensuring privacy can be maintained whether cells are occupied by one or two prisoners. There are no seats fitted on the lavatories.

11.3 Water flow to the wash hand basin, toilet and shower is managed by a 'Wallgate System'. This system restricts the amount of water that can be used and prisoners spoken with confirmed that, in normal cases, the frequency is adequate. There are occasions when prisoners have used their allocated water supply and are required to wait until the start of the next hourly cycle begins before being able to access water. Many prisoners reported that they retain empty soft drink bottles filled with water in their cells for such occasions primarily to fill their kettles.

11.4 The provision of integral showers allows prisoners to shower prior to attending court and after PT.

11.5 The main gymnasium has six prisoner showers, however prisoners tend only to use these if they attend PT during the normal working day when they may return directly to work after the session. During evening PT sessions most prisoners prefer to wait until they return to their cell to shower.

STANDARD 12

Food is adequate for health, varied and religiously and culturally appropriate.

12.1 The kitchen has been in operation for just over one year. The kitchen and all associated areas were at the time of inspection cleaned to a high standard and there is a clear separation of cleaning processes. Suitable and extensive signage around the kitchen ensures that cleaning materials are appropriate to each area. Following each service, the kitchen is cleaned by the prisoners in preparation for the next cooking activity. Full records of cleaning and inspections of areas following cleaning are kept.

12.2 Staff and prisoners are appropriately trained in food safety, hygiene, cleaning and catering skills. At the time of inspection there were 29 prisoners employed in the kitchen, all of whom were engaged in purposeful work. There is a separate training kitchen with the first group of five prisoners having successfully completing a fifteen week Scottish Vocational Qualification (SVQ) course at the time of inspection. The next group of prisoners have been selected from those working in the kitchen, who on completion of their SVQ will return to their role and train others. This is an area of good practice.

12.3 Food is stored in the kitchen in an appropriate manner with good separation of different types of foodstuffs, in particular high risk foods. The storage areas were clean and appeared to be well managed.

12.4 Breakfast cereals are provided and are available on a self‑service basis from within the servery areas in the house blocks. However, at the time of inspection no serving scoops were provided and a number of prisoners within the house blocks expressed concern that other prisoners are placing their hands directly into the containers. Unopened, catering‑sized bags of cereal are stored in areas throughout the house-blocks including empty cells and toilets.

Recommendation 16: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the arrangements for storing and serving breakfast cereals are safe and hygienic.

12.5 Special dietary requirements in terms of religious and medical needs are fully catered for.

12.6 The processes involved in food preparation, delivery and service were all witnessed. A system of portion control is in place at HMP Low Moss, with a number of 'wet' dishes being decanted into foil trays and delivered to house blocks. Portion sizes are adequate. A number of prisoners did complain about portion sizes however most comments received were regarding quality. Temperatures are carefully monitored within the kitchen and up to the point of placing the food in the heated trolleys prior to delivery. When the trolleys are awaiting collection outside the house blocks these are connected to the electrical supply to maintain their heat. This is an area of good practice. However due to the design of the trolleys in service there is a tendency for the food to deteriorate to a degree due to being 'steamed'. It was noted that an alternative trolley design which had separate hot/cold storage had, prior to the inspection, been successfully trialled.

Recommendation 17: HMP Low Moss to consider moving to the alternative trolley design.

12.7 Lunchtime meals Monday to Friday are served around 12:00 noon immediately on completion of the lunchtime numbers check. Evening meals are served at 5:00 pm with breakfast the following day at 7:30 am. The period between last and first meals is not overly excessive but is close to acceptable limits. At the weekend breakfast is from 8.30 am with the evening meal served around 4.45 pm.

12.8 Prisoners retain their own cutlery. Whilst sinks are provided in the servery, no prisoner was seen to use this facility to wash their cutlery, with a number of prisoners stating that they washed their cutlery in the wash‑hand basins within their cells. No spare cutlery was available. Dishwashers are provided in the serveries for washing crockery and cutlery however many of the dishwashers examined had dishwasher salt but lacked dishwashing tablets and prisoners were using washing‑up liquid instead.

Recommendation 18: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners have the means to properly wash their cutlery and crockery.

12.9 Fruit and vegetables are available on a daily basis.

OUTCOME 4

Prisoners are treated with respect by prison staff

STANDARD 13

Respect is the underlying basis of all interactions between staff and prisoners

13.1 Staff/prisoner relationships are positive throughout HMP Low Moss and interactions observed were respectful on both sides.

13.2 All staff wear name badges and in most cases prisoners address staff by their first name. Likewise in most cases staff address prisoners by their first names. This is especially prevalent in Clyde House which holds long term prisoners and to an extent in levels 2 and 3 of Kelvin House which hold short term prisoners.

13.3 In Kelvin House level 1, which holds remand prisoners, many staff and prisoners address each other by their first names however, in some cases it is more formal with staff addressing prisoners by their surname. This appears to be due to the fact the prisoners are only recent admissions and a more personal relationship between them and staff has yet to be formed. This did not detract from the professional and positive relationships in this area.

13.4 In normal circumstances staff are considerate when entering cells.

13.5 Staff are aware of their duty to deliver sensitive or unwelcome news in a professional manner. Staff spoken with noted that in most cases this is delivered by the FLM. However during the inspection a prisoner suffered a bereavement and was informed by his Personal Officer in the presence of the FLM as the prisoner had a positive relationship with the Officer. This was done in a private room away from other prisoners. All staff spoken with confirmed that sensitive or unwelcome news is given to a prisoner in private.

13.6 A number of Exceptional Escorted Day Absence (EEDA) requests were being processed during the period of the inspection. Documentation examined demonstrated that all relevant issues are considered and timescales are acceptable. Agreed security standards are in place for such escorts.

13.7 A number of prisoners from HMP Low Moss are transferred to less secure conditions i.e. National Top‑End or the Open Estate. In such cases they are regularly kept informed of progress.

13.8 Where prisoners are required to transfer to another establishment due to their need for protection from other prisoners, they are made aware of their new location and potential transfer date.

STANDARD 14

Security measures such as searching are carried out with regard to the protection of human dignity.

14.1 A number of rub down and body searches were observed during the inspection and these were all carried out by officers of the same gender. The quality of these searches varied and many could have been conducted in a more thorough manner.

14.2 All prisoners pass through a metal detecting portal prior to leaving a residential area. Those prisoners who register a positive indication are subject to a rub down search however the quality and thoroughness of this search did little to establish if the prisoner was in possession of a metal item. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 19: HMP Low Moss should ensure that all rub down searches are carried out to the same recognised standard.

14.3 Body searches conducted in the Reception and after visits are carried out in a comprehensive and professional manner. During these searches staff maintain positive communication with and issue clear instructions to the prisoner.

14.4 Prior to a cell search a copy of the prisoner's property card is e‑mailed to the officer conducting the search. This is then used to confirm the prisoner's belongings contained in his cell. This is positive.

OUTCOME 5

Good contact with family and friends is maintained

STANDARD 15

Family visits are given high priority in terms of frequency, length and quality and are not restricted as part of any disciplinary or control process.

15.1 The positive ethos aspired to in the SPS Offender Outcome Number Six (Maintained or improved relationships with families, peers and community) is evident in every element of visiting arrangements in Low Moss, from the point of first contact by visitors themselves and on to any follow-up. This is an area of good practice.

15.2 There is one full‑time, dedicated Family Contact Officer (FCO) employed in HMP Low Moss whose office is located in the visitors waiting area and who can be contacted by prisoners, their visitors or staff to discuss all matters related to visits and the maintenance of positive relationships while the offender is in custody. Prisoners and visitors can make contact in person, by telephone or by completing a referral form. Additionally, staff may make referrals via the SPS electronic information network system (SPIN). Contact details for the FCO are well publicised throughout the prison and within the visits areas. A comprehensive information booklet is also available to visitors which provides clear and useful facts about visiting the prison together with points of note in relation to the prison regime and details of helpful contacts for third sector organisations such as SACRO and Families Outside.

15.3 Prisoners new to the prison system are initially located in a dedicated area of HMP Low Moss where they take part in the PIP (see paragraph 1.14). As part of the PIP, a separate induction visit is arranged for the prisoner as soon as possible after admission by the FCO. This visit begins with a 20‑30 minute informative overview presented by the FCO and a prisoner management officer (PMO) from Clyde House level 1 where the PIP Unit is delivered. The prisoner and visitor(s) are then able to continue their visit while the FCO and PMO are on hand to provide any further information and advice as required. This is an area of good practice.

15.4 Visits are booked by the prisoners' visitors. There are two telephone lines operating during office hours from Monday to Friday. Both lines attract a standard telephone rate. Some prisoners complained that their visitors had difficulty in getting through to these telephone lines, thus preventing them from booking visits. This view was not supported by the majority of visitors spoken with during the inspection, nor borne out by the Inspection team's test calls to these telephone numbers to check access. On these occasions, Inspectors made contact on first attempt in 90% of the calls made and on the second attempt in the remaining 10%.

15.5 There is no maximum limit on visits. The minimum visit duration is one hour and ten minutes. This is positive.

15.6 No record of cancelled visits was found and no complaints recorded in relation to the cancellation of visits for any reason. Occasionally, 'normal' visit sessions are taken up by special events such as Recognition Awards ceremonies where prisoners who have gained an educational or vocational award use a visit session to invite their families to take part in the ceremony. These events are positive and have no negative impact on prisoners receiving their normal visit allocation. During the Inspection one such event took place where Catering SVQs were presented. This was attended by prisoners and their families and appeared to be appreciated by all in attendance.

15.7 Visitors are able to gain entry to the prison smoothly and without unnecessary delay. Visitors are required to attend 15 minutes prior to the start of the visit session. This provides sufficient time for them to complete the necessary administrative and security procedures. On entry to the visit room visitors have the opportunity to purchase snacks and soft drinks for themselves and the prisoner they are visiting prior to the visit commencing. This works well in HMP Low Moss and ensures the time spent at visits is not reduced by administrative procedures. This is positive.

15.8 Basic visit entitlements are not related to assessments of prisoner behaviour. For example, during the inspection, two prisoners located in Lomond House, the Separation and Reintegration Unit, were observed taking part in the children's visits session.

15.9 Closed visits are normally taken during the afternoon however, they can be arranged so as to best suit the needs and availability of the visitor. At the time of the inspection, only six prisoners in HMP Low Moss were subject to closed visits and examination of the associated paperwork demonstrated that, in each case, the application of closed visit status was justified. Additionally, a robust review process is in operation. Although the formal review timescale is three months, records show that there are instances where they take place within a shorter timeframe if warranted. The identification and management of excluded visitors is clear and applied and reviewed appropriately.

15.10 Around the time of inspection around 70% of the Prisoners had a home address in a local Community Justice Authority (CJA) Areas (Glasgow, Lanarkshire and North Strathclyde). The remaining 30% were from outlying CJA Areas or other jurisdictions.

STANDARD 16

Visitors are well treated.

16.1 At all stages of the visit experience in HMP Low Moss, visitors are treated courteously and are not subject to undue waiting. Locker facilities are available for visitors to place their bags and outer garments in prior to checking in at the main entrance. Once they have provided appropriate identification and gone through a thorough searching process, they are able to wait in the Family and Friends Centre until they are called to the visit room. During this time, visitors have the opportunity to speak with the FCO and to access information about the prison. This area frequently hosts awareness‑raising sessions for waiting visitors covering such subjects as ICM.

16.2 The Family and Friends Centre is clean and comfortable with sufficient seating to accommodate the number of visitors using the space. The male and female toilets and baby changing facilities located in this area are clean and well appointed.

STANDARD 17

Visits take place in the most relaxed environment compatible with security.

17.1 The visit room is large, modern and well furnished. It has sufficient space to accommodate 35 visits at any given time. A tea‑bar, staffed by volunteers and an employee of the SPS, operates at each session providing snacks, teas, coffees and soft drinks.

17.2 A dedicated play area provides toys and games for children of all ages, ranging from building blocks for toddlers to games consoles for teenagers. At the time of the inspection further work to develop the children's play area was taking place after consultation with and in response to comments sought from visitors, prisoners and visits staff.

17.3 Early evening visit sessions are dedicated to 'children's visits' where the main purpose of the visit is to allow fathers to engage in quality activities with their children. As these visits take place directly after the end of the school day, visitors and prisoners are provided with sandwiches and soft drinks. Staff encourage fathers to take an interest in their children's homework or to play with them in the dedicated play area. A Play Leader is also available during these sessions to encourage and develop positive parenting skills. This is an area of good practice.

STANDARD 18

Telephone contact is made as easy as possible.

18.1 There are sufficient telephones located in the residential areas to meet the demand of the population. Three telephones situated on every section of all levels in each of the two main house blocks provide unfettered access during the hours of unlock. Resource and access levels ensures that prisoners do not have to wait unduly to make a call. There are two telephones located in Lomond House; one in a dedicated telephone room and one in the orderly room waiting area. Prisoners held in segregation are offered the opportunity to use the telephone, as a minimum, on a daily basis and on request where practicable.

18.2 Appropriate signage, informing prisoners that their calls are monitored, is sited adjacent to every telephone within the prison.

18.3 The location of the telephones in both house blocks means that during recreation periods, background noise levels could be an issue resulting in prisoners being overheard or encountering difficulty in hearing the person they are calling. However, prisoners did not report this as an issue.

STANDARD 19

Letter contact is made as easy as possible.

19.1 There is no restriction on the number of letters prisoners are able to send and receive. Outgoing and incoming mail is managed well and without delay. Guidance relating to the opening of prisoners mail is adhered to.

19.2 At the time of inspection there were no adverse comments from prisoners regarding the mail process in HMP Low Moss.

OUTCOME 6

Prisoners' entitlements are accorded them in all circumstances without facing difficulty.

STANDARD 20

Staff are aware of their duty to give prisoners their legal rights. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

20.1 Induction sessions are delivered over the course of a week, and are well attended by prisoners. The induction follows the SPS national induction programme and provides good information of the opportunities available in HMP Low Moss. Many service providers attend the induction sessions or if unable to attend information booklets are freely available. This further supports the positive nature of the induction sessions. A peer mentor also attends and this provides prisoners with vital and practical information about the local regime and access to services. Mentors are also available in the FNIC and PIP Units. This is positive.

20.2 Information relating to induction is available in various languages including Braille and British Sign Language.

20.3 Legally privileged mail is logged and issued in accordance with current SPS practice. Prisoners are provided with confidential access to legal agents and the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO).

20.4 Prisoners are assisted in making contact with Visiting Committees, Legal Agents and external statutory bodies. Appellants are given appropriate assistance by staff. Those foreign prisoners spoken with confirmed that assistance in making contact with consular officials was available on request.

20.5 From the records of adjudications examined and the prisoners spoken with it is clear that care is taken to ensure prisoners involved in disciplinary proceedings understand the charges they face and that they are given enough time to prepare for the hearing and consult with others as appropriate. During all orderly room adjudications observed throughout the inspection where a finding of guilt was made and a punishment awarded, the adjudicator gave the prisoner advice about how he could lodge an appeal.

STANDARD 21

Staff are aware of their duty to observe the Human Rights of prisoners. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

21.1 Prisoners can access information on the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in the Library, with requests to contact the ECHR being facilitated by the Link Centre staff. Prison Rules, including European Prison Rules are also available to prisoners in the Library.

21.2 Information on respecting individuals, including race‑related issues was observed being discussed during prisoner induction. It was noted during the inspection that there are no current recorded prisoner complaints regarding racial discrimination.

STANDARD 22

Staff are aware of their duty to treat prisoners in accordance with fairness and natural justice. They know what this involves. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

22.1 Within the Residential house blocks a request book is available as are complaint forms. It was noted that the complaints process flow chart was posted in some but not all Residential areas.

Recommendation 20: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the complaint process flowchart is posted for prisoners to see in all Residential areas.

22.2 A central database of prisoner complaints is maintained within HMP Low Moss, with actions and timescales tracked to ensure timely responses are provided. Prisoners and staff confirm that attempts are made to resolve matters prior to entering the formal process, where appropriate. No evidence was noted of prisoners being victimised for having accessed their legal right to complain.

22.3 All prisoners can shower prior to attending court as they have a shower within their cell.

22.4 In the majority of cases prisoners wear their own clothing when attending court. However some who know they are returning opt to wear prison issue tee-shirts and/or jumpers and denims.

Recommendation 21: HMP Low Moss should ensure prisoners do not attend court in prison issue clothing.

22.5 Orderly Room adjudications observed follow the recognised format, are fully compliant with Prison Rules and are underpinned by the principles of natural justice.

STANDARD 23

Segregation is used sparingly and in accordance with procedures.

23.1 Unlike other Segregation Units within the SPS, Lomond House, the Separation and Reintegration Unit in HMP Low Moss, is a self-contained area within Clyde House, one of the two main residential accommodation blocks. The layout of the Unit is also unique with a distinct separation between the cellular accommodation and the services accommodation which includes a healthcare room, telephone room, physical training room, kit (clothing) store and cleaning store. There are twelve cells, eight of which were occupied at the time of the inspection. In addition, a silent cell is located in the services area.

23.2 Records for those prisoners who are located in Lomond House are kept in separate folders within the staff office and contain information pertaining to the reasons for their segregation and an initial assessment of their presenting behaviour on admission to the Unit. In addition, on-going assessments and daily narratives are recorded and maintained in the files which give details of their attitude and response to segregation and their relationships and interaction with staff. All significant events are also noted, together with outcomes from on-going reviews and regular case conferences. The daily narratives are read each week by the Unit Manager who annotates the records to confirm this and a weekly electronic summary is placed on the prisoner's record within PR2. From reviewing the records and speaking with prisoners in Lomond House, it is apparent that the reasons for their segregation are made clear to them on entry to the Unit. Similarly, a review of their situation takes place regularly.

23.3 Prisoners in Lomond House enjoy access to a regime commensurate with their surroundings and required levels of security. Time in the fresh air is available for a minimum of one hour per day and may be extended to up to two hours per day on request (depending on occupancy levels) in one of three external exercise areas. Waterproof jackets are available on request for use in wet weather. Access to one of the two telephones is regularly available and visit entitlement is not affected by their segregation status (see paragraph 15.8). Prisoners held in Lomond House take their visits in the main visit room and can access the full range of visits, including Family visits.

23.4 Those prisoners who are being held in segregation because they refuse to return to mainstream conditions have occasional access to the library. All other prisoners in Lomond House are able to select library books from a reading list which are then delivered to the unit. Although Learning Centre staff do not engage in one‑to‑one learning activities with prisoners, they regularly send workbooks to the Unit for those individuals who wish to occupy their time in educational activity. Access to programmed interventions is not hindered by location in Lomond House and prisoners may take part in such activities aimed at addressing their offending behaviour as and when required if, after a risk assessment, it is deemed safe and secure to do so.

23.5 A Doctor pays a weekly visit to each prisoner in the Unit. A nurse will attend prisoners located within Lomond House to ensure that they are mentally and physically well to remain there.

23.6 Cleaning of the communal areas in Lomond House is carried out by the Industrial Cleaning Party (ICP). The cleaning store is well stocked with appropriate materials and equipment. The kit (clothing) store is neat and tidy and holds sufficient kit for the size of the Unit. While in Lomond House, prisoners wear only Lomond-issue clothing. There are no pass men employed in the Unit; staff take responsibility for serving meals and dish washing and prisoners can request access to cleaning materials daily to clean their own cells. With the exception of the small telephone room which was showing signs of wear and tear and had graffiti on the walls, general cleanliness in Lomond House was of an acceptable standard.

23.7 Of particular concern at the time of the inspection were two cells occupied by one prisoner who was conducting a "dirty protest" by covering the walls of his cell in excrement and piling up waste food, etc., at his door. Two cells at the end of the Unit were reserved for his use and he alternated between both in order to allow the ICP access to clean one at a time, using recognised bio‑hazard cleaning techniques. It is of note that repeated deep-cleaning has damaged the fabric of both these cells and they require to be re-plastered and re-decorated as a matter of urgency.

Recommendation 22: HMP Low Moss should ensure that those cells occupied during the dirty protest are cleaned and made good.

23.8 A search of the SPS Prison Resource Library (PRL) found a limited number of localised risk assessments and safe systems of work however it is concerning to note that there is no one, national, recognised protocol or standard operating procedure which deals with such situations.

Recommendation 23: SPS should ensure that a national protocol for dealing with prisoners on dirty protests is designed and implemented across the estate.

PART 3. OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-IMPROVEMENT AND ACCESS TO SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES

OUTCOME 7

Prisoners take part in activities that educate, develop skills and personal qualities and prepare them for life outside prison.

STANDARD 24

The regime of the prison encourages prisoners to make the most of their time there and to exercise responsibility.

24.1 Induction sessions take place in the Link Centre. The facilities are open, light and offer a pleasant environment. The level of privacy is good and allows for private conversations without security being compromised.

24.2 All prisoners, both convicted and untried, have the opportunity to attend induction and participate in the National Induction Programme. This can last for up to one week and the programme has the ability to be tailored to reflect individual's specific needs. A core screen is carried out on all prisoners and recorded on PR2. Reviews are also carried out at the identified and appropriate intervals as is the pre‑release assessment.

24.3 At the start of the week, participating prisoners are provided with their own timetable, detailing what their appointments are and when they should be attending them. A request is made by the Link Centre staff to the residential house blocks for the prisoners who are required to attend these sessions. Not all the prisoners turn up for their appointments. Staff in the Link Centre then have to contact the house blocks to determine why individuals are not attending. This takes up a significant amount of staff time. This is a weakness.

Recommendation 24: HMP Low Moss should ensure prisoners attend the Link Centre for induction when required to do so.

24.4 Untried prisoners are paid £5.00 if they attend all their scheduled induction sessions. This is positive.

24.5 At the end of the week's induction the prisoner then participates in the Prisoner Allocation Board. A matrix has been developed that enables prisoners to see what opportunities for employment are available to them. This reduces subjectivity and clearly indicates what the requirements are to be able to work in each area. This is positive.

24.6 Those prisoners who have never been in custody before are located in a separate wing of the establishment and offered a place on the PIP. This is available to both untried and convicted prisoners. These prisoners have little opportunity to mix with other prisoners not undertaking the programme. There is a full assessment, including the core screen, carried out on admission. A number of staff reported never having been trained in carrying out these assessments but had learned from their colleagues. Once the assessment has taken place it is kept on a SharePoint site to be shared with other staff delivering the PIP. It is not shared with other service providers who are working with those prisoners or who may be working with them in the future. A comprehensive programme is provided to those prisoners undertaking the PIP and may be adapted for specific individual requirements. Personal Officers have significant input into the management of individuals participating in the PIP. They arrange for a family visit the day after admission and along with the FCO facilitate this visit and make themselves available to families to answer any questions. This is positive.

Recommendation 25: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the Positive Impact Programme assessment documentation is uploaded to PR2 to be shared with others working with the individual prisoner.

24.7 Most prisoners spoken with who had taken part in the PIP spoke positively about it. However a number stated they had experienced difficulty in integrating into the mainstream environment once they had finished the programme.

24.8 The PIP had not been fully evaluated at the time of the inspection.

Recommendation 26: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the Positive Impact Programme is fully evaluated and those evaluation recommendations integrated into the future programme.

24.9 There are a number of partner agencies delivering services to prisoners during induction and post release (such as those noted in paragraph 30.6). Effective working relationships have been established and a number of the partners reported feeling part of the team. The Link Centre staff are actively increasing the number of partner agencies involved as not all services are currently available to all prisoners. This is dependent upon the prisoner's home address and relevant Local Authority involvement.

24.10 For those prisoners who have addresses out with the Local Authority areas that are represented in the prison they have the opportunity to have their community reintegration appointments take place over the telephone. This is positive.

24.11 A regular Food Focus Group chaired by the Catering Manager with prisoner representation from both Clyde and Kelvin Halls are held. A range of related matters are discussed and actions taken.

24.12 There is a functioning Personal Officer scheme within the establishment. However the establishment should take steps to ensure that personal officer allocation is monitored to ensure that every prisoner is allocated a Personal Officer at the earliest opportunity. Action should be taken to improve the attendance of Personal Officers at ICM case conferences, as it was reported by a number of prisoners that their Personal Officer was not always available to attend.

24.13 There are Prisoner Information and Action Committees (PIAC) in both Clyde and Kelvin House however minutes for both areas show the meeting schedule to be rather sporadic. In Clyde House there are only minutes available from September and December 2012 and February and April 2013. In Kelvin House there are only minutes available from January and April 2013. In addition, some meetings in both Clyde and Kelvin Houses are for individual levels while others encompass the whole area. The issues discussed at these meetings are relevant across the whole prison.

Recommendation 27: HMP Low Moss should ensure that PIAC meetings are held on a regular basis.

24.14 While most prisoners spoken with are aware of the PIAC system many are unaware of the outcomes from any PIAC meetings.

24.15 PIAC minutes are not displayed on prisoner notice boards.

Recommendation 28: HMP Low Moss should ensure that minutes of PIAC meetings are displayed on prisoners' notice boards.

STANDARD 25

A full day's out of cell activities, such as work, education, leisure and cultural pursuits, is available for seven days of the week.

25.1 The prison aspires to provide prisoners with 35 hours of purposeful activity each week. While this is not achieved by everyone, HMP Low Moss delivers the highest levels of purposeful activity within SPS public sector prisons. This is positive. The range of purposeful activities available, includes industrial work, vocational training, programmed interventions, education, PT as well as some creative, cultural and leisure activities.

25.2 The majority of activity is delivered throughout the working day, Monday‑Friday. Records indicate that over 300 prisoners leave the halls each day to engage in purposeful activity and a further 162 work in the house blocks in pass jobs. The out of hall work is delivered over four sessions per day, two each in the morning and afternoon, however during the second morning session a number of prisoners leave the workshops to attend PT. This results in a number of vacant spaces and lost work opportunities in the worksheds.

Recommendation 29: HMP Low Moss should ensure that work spaces operate at their optimum capacity at all times.

25.3 The pass jobs within Kelvin and Clyde house blocks do not follow a normal Monday to Friday, 08:00 am to 5:00 pm work pattern. Instead, passmen work over a seven day period which cumulatively delivers their overall activity hours.

25.4 Some passmen are employed in the house blocks to work in the pantries. A number of these prisoners reported that they had not undertaken any form of food hygiene training.

Recommendation 30: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners involved in food distribution are given the appropriate training.

25.5 For those less able prisoners who are difficult to place in mainstream work parties there is low skilled work available in the Poppy Party. This is positive.

25.6 A SharePoint site provides details of the timetabled activities for prisoners on a weekly basis. This is positive. Whilst this is available to staff, some prisoners commented that they were not always fully aware of their forthcoming timetabled activities.

Recommendation 31: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners are given advance information of their timetabled activities.

25.7 At the weekend and during the evening recreation periods, prisoners in HMP Low Moss take part in traditional activities including pool, table tennis, cell association, board games and games consoles and use of the small fitness area within each section of the house blocks. These are generally well attended. However, unlike the majority of other SPS establishments there are unprecedented access to physical exercise in the large gymnasium, weights room, on the large football field, the five‑a‑side pitches. This is positive.

25.8 In addition to traditional evening and weekend work opportunities such as pass and catering jobs, occasional opportunities arise for prisoners to work additional hours in the wood machine workshop. This is positive.

STANDARD 26

The programme of work and related training focuses on equipping prisoners for employment on release.

26.1 HMP Low Moss offers a number of Vocational Training opportunities. Mainly they are linked to construction trades such as plumbing, painting and joinery. Vocational qualifications are also offered in catering and industrial cleaning. Employment in the gardens and waste management, the laundry and wood machining production plants offer relevant work opportunities for prisoners. A hairdressing salon is in operation and the officer in charge of the party is undertaking assessor training and sourcing appropriate training to deliver to prisoners. Some workshops have recently changed function. This was to reflect the staff skills available and opportunities for further training. This has had the additional benefit of providing staff rotation and continuous cover for the worksheds. The joinery workshop was introduced to up skill prisoners who could then progress onto the production workshops. The production workshops are currently working on manufacturing cell fittings for new establishments. There is no anticipated drop in the workload in the near future.

26.2 All the workshop facilities are clean, bright and fit for purpose. The staff who are delivering the training are experienced and hold or are working towards appropriate qualifications.

26.3 Last year there were 912 Vocational and Employment related Qualifications delivered and 241 Work Skills Qualifications at Level 5 or above. If the current level of outturn is maintained then these targets will be exceeded this reporting year. This is positive.

26.4 Collaboration with Motherwell College has resulted in contextualised learning in some of the VT workshops. This involves a lecturer teaching numeracy skills in a workshop environment. Many prisoners reported having found this alternative style of learning beneficial and engaged them in learning that they had not previously engaged in. This is positive.

STANDARD 27

A broad and relevant education programme is available.

27.1 HMP Low Moss Learning Centre provides a welcoming and well‑presented environment for prisoners to engage in purposeful learning activities. The centre is well‑equipped overall and prisoners are able to access a range of learning resources appropriate to their studies. Around 35% of prisoners attend education classes each month for at least one session per week. Both convicted and untried prisoners attend classes but uptake from untried prisoners is low. Prisoners on PIP have four dedicated sessions in the Learning Centre each week.

27.2 Relationships between prisoners and Learning Centre Staff are positive and mutually respectful. Prisoners attending classes value the interaction and support provided by the centre staff and manager.

27.3 Most Learning Centre activities are certificated and between April 2012 and May 2013, 139 prisoners have gained SQA awards. Prisoner success is appropriately celebrated. The Learning Centre presents a monthly 'Learner of the Month' award to an individual who has made significant progress, either academically or behaviourally. This award is valued by prisoners who view it as an endorsement of their achievement.

27.4 Although the Learning Centre meets the criteria of the SPS contract, the curriculum is not sufficiently wide enough to provide all prisoners with the range and depth of subjects to progress beyond core skills. Some initial work in improving contextualisation of numeracy by Learning Centre Staff is taking place with prisoners in three vocational workshops (see paragraph 26.4). However, the planning for integration of all core skills in vocational training is not systematic.

27.5 Too few prisoners make use of the Learning Centre. Currently 65% of prisoners make no use of it at all. Of the 35% of prisoners who do, 40% attend for only a single 1.5 hour session per week.

27.6 Pay for prisoners attending education classes is in line with SPS national wages policy. There is no financial detriment for prisoners attending education classes.

27.7 Prisoners also receive a small cash incentive for each completed award in recognition of educational achievement.

27.8 Those Prisoners that attend the Learning Centre make good use of the activities on offer to develop and express creativity in their learning. Music, art and creative writing are important vehicles for this creative activity. This is further promoted and enhanced through workshops and engagement with external art bodies and guest speakers. In the last year, a good range of authors, actors and musicians have performed and presented workshops to prisoner groups. Prisoners place high value on these activities.

27.9 Some prisoners are actively engaged in contributing to the STIR magazine (Motherwell College initiative prison arts magazine run by an editorial board consisting of prisoners at HMP Shotts). HMP Low Moss prisoners' articles and art work are regularly published.

27.10 There are very good examples of prisoner creativity on display within the Learning Centre and Link Centre. These include prisoner artwork, sculptures and wall displays. This both celebrates achievement and promotes activities to other prisoners.

27.11 Prisoners within the Creative Writing class are engaging in high level activities contributing towards Higher and Advance Higher English qualifications. One prisoner is writing a screen play.

27.12 Prisoners have access to quality art programmes. It was noted that some 90 pieces of HMP Low Moss prisoner art work and creative writing have been submitted to The Koestler Trust.

27.13 Due to the relatively settled nature of the prison population, prisoners are not routinely transferred mid course. Prison managers give approriate consideration to prisoner involvement in education programmes in any decision making process. This minimises potential disruption to prisoner learning.

27.14 Classes in the Learning Centre are rarely cancelled. When required, staff provide cover for absent colleagues to minimise disruption to prisoner learning.

27.15 Prisoners benefit from access to high quality indoor and outdoor PT and gymnasium facilities. The gymnasium is well‑equipped with a suitable range of exercise and training equipment. An indoor games hall is used by prisoners for activities such as badminton and indoor bowls. Prisoners also make good use of the outdoor all‑weather football pitch. The Gymnasium and outdoor football facilities are also available to prisoners in the evening and at weekends. Prisoners value PT time as it gives a focus and develops self‑discipline.

27.16 A recently introduced physical education programme offers a more structured approach in its delivery by prison staff. The programme is also encouraging a better uptake of activities by prisoners. More targeted age and ability classes, such as over 50s yoga, are better meeting the needs of the whole prisoner population. This is positive.

27.17 Recently introduced sport specific activity clubs, such as running, are helping prisoners to increase their individual skill level and awareness of the sport. These activity clubs also encourage prisoners to develop a broader approach to fitness.

27.18 All prisoners complete an induction prior to accessing the fitness equipment. Passmen actively contribute to the delivery of gymnasium awareness sessions to new prisoners alongside other staff.

27.19 HMP Low Moss staff are in the early stages of introducing accredited coaching opportunities for prisoners in Badminton.

27.20 Prisoners who refuse to participate in purposeful activity are denied gym access during the working day.

27.21 Prisoners in the full‑time Education work party are limited to two PT sessions per week. However, prisoners in other work parties have the opportunity to attend more than two sessions, if places are available. This opportunity is imbalanced for those prisoners in full‑time education.

Recommendation 32: HMP Low Moss should review the allocation of gym sessions for those prisoners involved in full‑time education.

STANDARD 28

A range of interventions is in place to encourage prisoners to address those behaviours which may contribute to their offending.

28.1 HMP Low Moss has robust processes and procedures in place to undertake the assessment of prisoners needs and risks. A Risk and Needs assessment is undertaken on all prisoners involved in the ICM process. In addition there are strong multi‑disciplinary arrangements for the completion of Generic Programme Assessments (GPA). There is also good multi‑disciplinary working between ICM, Social Work, Programmes and Psychology staff. This is supported by relevant co‑sharing of office facilities.

28.2 The appropriate suite of programmed interventions are delivered. This includes Violence Prevention Programme (VPP), Controlling Anger and Regulating Emotions (CARE), Constructs and Substance Related Offending Behaviour Programme (SROBP). These programmes are delivered in accommodation which is suitable for purpose. Selection for these programmes is in line with SPS guidance.

28.3 HMP Low Moss is currently developing an intervention programme aimed specifically at the short term population. While the concept, target group and approach are worth commending, at the time of the inspection insufficient progress had been made on which to make reliable assessment. HMIPS look forward to reviewing progress in this area.

28.4 At the time of the inspection there were a number of end of course programme reports outstanding. Such reports may have a negative impact on prisoners progression.

Recommendation 33: HMP Low Moss should ensure that end of course reports are delivered within relevant timescales.

28.5 The ICM process is well established and has the appropriate administrative structures in place. There are good working relations between ICM and Prison‑based Social Work.

28.6 HMP Low Moss has a functioning Risk Management Team (RMT). The RMT meetings are well attended and appropriately structured to deal with the business of managing risk. In line with SPS guidance all outcomes are recorded and systems are in place to agree how the outcomes will be communicated to the prisoner.

28.7 Prisoners are involved in the process of identifying risk and needs where relevant. They are actively involved in the ICM process, programme assessments and progression discussions with prisoners being invited to attend relevant parts of the RMT meeting. Assessments are competently undertaken and are in line with guidance.

STANDARD 29

There is a programme of cultural and voluntary activities.

29.1 Prisoners have access to news media every day should they choose. Access to radio and television is good. Prisoners can request to have newspapers or magazines delivered at their own expense. All prisoners have an in cell television, which also provides national radio coverage. Prisoners can access tabloid daily newspapers within the Link Centre.

29.2 Good use is made of the current Passman's previous business experience to assist in running the library. The library is not open in the evening or at weekends. Library attendance figures are low. (Daily average of eleven against a prison population of 700+). Due to the locked doors between the Link Centre and the library prisoners cannot easily access the library. The library is not well stocked. This is a weakness. Links to local authority library services are not yet fully established. A useful stock of relevant information leaflets is available within the library. Prisoners can access to up‑to‑date legal text on request. The prison has been pro‑active in securing publications in limited range of foreign languages e.g. contact with Romanian Consulate.

Recommendation 34: HMP Low Moss should establish links to local authority library service.

Recommendation 35: HMP Low Moss should provide greater access to the Library.

29.3 There are limited opportunities for prisoners to engage in voluntary work. The Listener Scheme is currently in operation and is being supported by the Samaritans.

Some prisoners act as volunteer mentors for new prisoners in the PIP Unit.

STANDARD 30

Opportunities to practise their religion are available to all prisoners.

30.1 Prisoners are able to practise their religion. The chaplaincy team includes representatives from the Church of Scotland, the Roman Catholic Church and a representative of the Muslim faith. Representatives of other religions and faiths can be provided as required. Visiting representatives are provided with facilities and opportunities to deliver appropriate pastoral care.

30.2 A Multi‑Faith facility is provided for the delivery of religious services and is also used for other purposes such as a weekly meditation group. The accommodation is of adequate proportions. In an attempt to brighten the facility currently prisoners art is being displayed.

30.3 Sufficient, suitable religious books and artefacts are in place and appropriate storage is provided.

30.4 About 10% of the prison population regularly attend services. Services are weekly, on a Sunday morning for Church of Scotland, Friday afternoon for Roman Catholic and Friday evenings for Muslim prayer sessions. There is an additional regular schedule of activities including prison fellowship and bible study meetings. The timing of services for some groups of prisoners conflicts with visits and exercise times. This may discourage attendance.

Recommendation 36: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners attendance at religious services is not at the expense of access to other entitlements.

30.5 In addition to the standard services a series of events are planned around significant religious times within the year, such as Christmas, Easter and EID. This includes such events as carol services. A number of other groups and courses are held throughout the year and include awareness on restorative justice, lessons from the life of Joseph and 'An Eye for an Eye' which looks at alternatives to retaliation. A weekly Film Study Group is held in partnership with Education and aims to challenge perceptions/prejudices. This appears to be a well thought out activity.

30.6 The Chaplaincy Team has developed relationships with a number of throughcare agencies, these include Faith in Throughcare, the Bethany Trust, the ARCH Glasgow, Glasgow City Mission and the Simon Community. This is positive.

30.7 The Chaplaincy Team work ecumenically and visit residential areas on a daily basis to offer pastoral care.

30.8 Chaplains attend inductions. Officers inform chaplains of admission to the PIP Unit which allow these prisoners to be visited a short time after admission. Prisoners faith preferences are discussed during the reception process and recorded on PR2.

STANDARD 31

Suitable arrangements to enable prisoners to buy a range of personal and other items that meet prisoners' needs are in place and available as necessary.

31.1 Convicted prisoners can spend their wage and allocated Prisoner Personal Cash (PPC) in the prison canteen on a weekly basis. Prisoners on remand can access this service twice a week.

31.2 The canteen stocks a varied selection of smoking products, groceries, soft drinks, confectionery, stationery and toiletries, all of which are comparable in range and price with other establishments. In line with SPS policy the canteen does not stock glass or tinned items.

31.3 There are no dedicated prisoner consultation groups in place to discuss the canteen process. However some minutes of Clyde and Kelvin House PIAC meetings have a canteen theme and were attended by the Canteen Manager. In addition prisoners can make comment on the process by completing a comments box on their weekly canteen order form. These comments, along with continued monitoring of goods sold, have led to numerous changes to stock items.

31.4 While the canteen list generally reflects the requirements of the majority of the prisoner population preferences, the canteen manager can respond to requests from prisoners of different cultures for items more in keeping with their needs. If they are deemed to be acceptable they will be purchased specifically for that prisoner or added to the canteen stock list if it is felt they will be popular. Prisoners can request such items by completing a comments section on their weekly canteen order form.

31.5 Prisoners can purchase cards to mark family, religious and cultural events. This process is well used and is especially popular around recognised celebrations. All cards are priced at £1.50 and are ordered by completing a form which is freely available in residential areas. These forms are also used to order newspapers, fruit and vegetables and a very limited amount of toiletries additional to those on the main canteen sheet.

31.6 HMP Low Moss has a contract in place which enables prisoners to purchase items not routinely available as long as they are on the prescribed articles in use list. Orders are taken on a weekly basis and staff collect any goods from the supplier.

OUTCOME 8

Healthcare is provided to the same standard as in the community outside prison, available in response to need, with a full range of preventative services, promoting continuity with health services outside prison.

STANDARD 32

Health services of a high quality are available to all who need them.

32.1 There is a good, regular confidential self-referral process in place.

32.2 All referrals are triaged and prioritised in the mornings. In addition, officers from each house block contact the health centre every morning at 8:00 am to inform healthcare staff of those prisoners who are reporting 'sick for work' allowing assessments to be arranged for that same day. This is positive.

32.3 Prisoners report that they feel confidentiality is not assured when attending the Doctor. The clinical interview room door is left open at all times throughout the appointment resulting in others outside the room being able to hear the consultation. This does not give prisoners the confidence to be open and honest at times with medical staff. This also presents a risk in relation to information being overheard by other prisoners which is subsequently used to threaten, bully or intimidate them. This is poor practice.

32.4 Appropriate medical services are provided without undue delay. As a result of an efficient referral and triage system, urgent cases are seen on the same day of referral. Maximum waiting time to see a Doctor for non‑urgent cases is approximately seven days.

32.5 Doctors are available for 44 hours per week, operating Monday to Saturday as a standing service. Medical services on Sundays are provided by Doctors employed specifically for prison heathcare by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde on an out of hours contract.

32.6 Out of hours provision is available from the on‑call rota by Doctors employed for prison healthcare by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Any requirement for medical opinion after 6:00 pm can be accessed via the prison specific on call rota.

32.7 For routine appointments, the maximum waiting times are:

Primary Care Nursing ‑ seven days

Mental Health Nursing ‑ four weeks

All prisoners are reviewed by a Doctor within 24 hours of reception process on arrival to the establishment. Mental health nursing assessments are completed within 72 hours.

32.8 Pharmacy arrangements in place are inconsistent. There is no pharmacy assistant employed. Two nurses are required to order, sort and check multiple medications in preparation for dispensing to prisoners who are prescribed 'in possession' medications. This is a daily occurrence and a non‑productive use of clinical expertise specific to a pharmacy role. This is an area of poor practice.

32.9 The full complement of healthcare staff is not in place. Seven clinical positions were vacant at the time of inspection. These include Primary Care and Mental Health nursing positions and Nursing Assistants.

Recommendation 37: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that they have a full complement of staff within HMP Low Moss.

32.10 Access to a prisoner's community-based healthcare record is minimal through the electronic Primary Care health record, VISION. This allows a degree of information to be viewed and updated by healthcare professionals at the point of screening as part of the reception process. A hard copy of the prisoner's medical record is requested from his registered medical practice. Consent for accessing health related information is obtained on reception to the establishment.

32.11 Where a prisoner is transferred from another establishment, full and complete healthcare records and appropriate transfer information (care summary, etc.) should arrive with the prisoner. There is evidence indicating that this does not always happen. This is a weakness.

32.12 There is good communication with Doctors services regarding a prisoner's release. Written communication is sent to his receiving Doctor as well as an alert being posted on VISION informing the Doctor of the prisoner's return to his local surgery. Where required, a five day prescription is supplied on release and follow-up arrangements are put in place with appropriate community‑based services through a combination of written and verbal communications.

32.13 When a prisoner is refused registration with a Doctor on his release, his healthcare records are returned to NHS Practitioner Services. He is advised of this and given their contact details and encouraged to contact them. Practitioner Services are subsequently responsible for identifying a Doctor and allocating the released prisoner to that Practice.

32.14 As healthcare records are held both electronically and in paper‑based format, ensuring that all relevant information is transferred to the appropriate healthcare provider on release can prove time‑consuming. This also creates unnecessary risks should information be missed or reported out of context.

Recommendation 38: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that prisoners' relevant healthcare information is transferred to the appropriate health care provider on his release.

32.15 Healthcare staff in HMP Low Moss report having experienced difficulty in accessing patient information from NHS Hospitals. This can delay the appropriate treatment being offered to prisoners on their return from hospital. This is a weakness.

32.16 Confidential management of prisoner healthcare records within the Health Centre itself is good.

32.17 During the inspection medical records received from outwith the establishment were seen to have been delivered, wrapped in a brown envelope and partially opened.

Recommendation 39: The NHS should ensure that all medical notes are securely transferred.

32.18 Where required, prisoners with a mental illness are transferred to a more appropriate setting without delay. There have been 11 transfers to alternative specialist facilities within the previous 12 months.

32.19 There are arrangements in place to meet the special medical needs of all individuals and groups within the establishment:

  • Dental services are provided for three sessions per week;
  • Ophthalmic services are provided one day every two weeks;
  • Podiatry services are provided one session every two weeks; and
  • Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy are delivered externally.

STANDARD 33

Addictions are dealt with the way most likely to be effective and when they conflict, treatment takes priority over security measures as far as possible.

33.1 There is one senior addiction nurse and alcohol liaison nurse, two addiction nurses and four healthcare support workers allocated to addictions. At the time of inspection one addiction nurse, alcohol liaison nurse and two addiction support workers were in post. There is also access to a Doctor with specialist addictions knowledge.

33.2 The addictions case load at the time of inspection was reported to be 297. Access to addiction services is made primarily via self-referral although prisoners may be encouraged to attend following positive drug tests or as an outcome of the admission process.

33.3 There is evidence of routine medical prevalence testing taking place within the prison for those prisoners on a substitute prescribing regime.

33.4 There is little opportunity or capacity to offer health promotion in respect of addictions and substance or alcohol misuse. This is a weakness.

33.5 The volume of substitute prescribing outweighs the clinical resource and time allocation within the daily prison regime. The average time for administering Methadone is one minute per patient. This does not constitute good prescribing practice and should be reviewed. This is a weakness.

33.6 There is evidence of throughcare arrangements in place for those being released whilst under the care of addictions services. Communications are made with the receiving community services, prescribers and where relevant, dispensing services.

33.7 There is a process in place for compulsory drug testing, however the number of prisoners tested in HMP Low Moss is low in comparison to other establishments. From staff spoken with it appears that this is in some way due to the protracted nature of the process (up to five hours), during which time the two Residential Officers who are administering the test cannot perform their core duties.

Recommendation 40: HM Low Moss should increase the number of non-clinical drugs tests carried out.

33.8 HMP Low Moss does not have a dedicated central area or staff group to undertake non-clinical drug tests. Instead tests are carried out by suitably training residential officers in fit for purpose clinical rooms in both house blocks. There are no issues in relation to the chain of custody or legitimacy of the testing process.

OUTCOME 9

Appropriate steps are taken to ensure that prisoners are integrated safely into the community and where possible into a situation less likely to lead to further crime.

STANDARD 34

The prison has a policy on links with families and with the local community and allocates staff time to implement it.

34.1 The prison has invested a significant amount of time and resource in developing effective and robust services that encourage family involvement.

34.2 There is no maximum visit entitlement which means a prisoner can receive a visit every day if his family wishes to visit.

34.3 There is one dedicated FCO. The remainder of the visit group staff also have the role of the FCO as part of their job description. The prison operates to the National Standards for Children and Families and has quarterly strategy meetings. No families are on the strategy group.

Recommendation 41: HMP Low Moss should give consideration to including a family representative onto the Children and Families strategy group.

34.4 Funding has recently been granted to Turning Point Scotland to take the lead in a community reintegration partnership with HMP Low Moss and other national Third Sector organisations. This is called the Prisoner Support Pathway. The prison has dedicated a First Line Manager and two prisoner management officers to assist in the implementation of this project. This initiative began during the week of the inspection and HMIPS look forward to reviewing progress.

34.5 Prior to opening of HMP Low Moss, senior staff presented to a number of local community organisations. They were asked for their assistance in developing the Low Moss Community Voluntary Group (LMCVG). There are now approximately 60‑70 members of this group. They deliver services including play leaders, visit tea bar operatives, prisoner visitors and provide a front of house welcome stall. The LMCVG are provided with a training package, given prison ID cards and are welcomed as part of the staff group. This has led to a positive ethos between the prison and the local community. This is an area of good practice.

34.6 Currently prisoners are involved with community groups by making benches and plant pots within the prison that are distributed to local organisations. This is positive.

STANDARD 35

Arrangements are made for prisoners to leave with somewhere appropriate to live, healthcare, continuity assured, a chance to find work and build social links.

35.1 Pre‑release arrangements are in place to ensure that prisoners returning to the community have the appropriate supports in place.

35.2 There are good links between the establishment and community partners. The establishment has good risk management processes which supports case management and the release of prisoners on HDC, parole and on liberation. HDC within the establishment is appropriately managed and there are examples of prisoners progressing through the prison system. All the establishment's case management structures are focused towards risk reduction and case management with defensible decision making is evident.

35.3 Partner agencies are appropriately integrated into the establishment and clearly feel part of the "Low Moss Team".

Recommendations

PART 1 - SAFETY

STANDARD 1

Prisoners are safe at all times; while being escorted to and from prison, in prison and while under escort in any location.

Recommendation 1: HMP Low Moss should provide written information for prisoners in a number of languages other than English. (Paragraph 1.13)

Recommendation 2: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners can read the written information issued to them. (Paragraph 1.13)

Recommendation 3: HMP Low Moss should introduce a system which gives assurance that night patrol routes and observations are being undertaken properly. (Paragraph 1.28)

Recommendation 4: HMP Low Moss should ensure that there is adequate first aid cover within the establishment at all times. (Paragraph 1.29)

Recommendation 5: HMP Low Moss should ensure fire awareness training targets are met. (Paragraph 1.30)

Recommendation 6: HMP Low Moss should ensure cell door observation panels are not covered up. (Paragraph 1.36)

STANDARD 2

Force is only used as a last resort and then strictly according to law and procedures

Recommendation 7: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the Head of Operations completes Section I of the Use of Force Reporting Form. (Paragraph 2.4)

STANDARD 3

Prisoners are protected from violence and harm by other prisoners

Recommendation 8: HMP Low Moss should ensure the SPS Anti-Bullying Strategy is implemented. (Paragraph 3.12)

STANDARD 4

Security levels for individuals are no higher than is necessary to meet the risk presented by the prisoner.

Recommendation 9: HMP Low Moss should ensure that all Prisoner Supervision System reviews are undertaken within the prescribed timeframes. (Paragraph 4.1)

STANDARD 5

Procedures for deciding security levels are as transparent as is compatible with the sensitivities of the decision.

No recommendations.

PART 2: DECENCY, HUMANITY AND RESPECT FOR LEGAL RIGHTS

STANDARD 6

The standards that apply to the treatment of prisoners in prison extend to all other places where they are held.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 7

The accommodation is clean and provides a reasonable amount of space for each prisoner, with space for personal belongings, ventilation, a reasonable temperature, natural light.

Recommendation 10: HMP Low Moss should identify an appropriate area within cells for the display of photographs. (Paragraph 7.3)

Recommendation 11: HMP Low Moss should remove all storage items out with the original cell design and provide prisoners with sufficient, appropriate storage facilities. (Paragraph 7.4)

Recommendation 12: SPS should review the storage provision in the cellular design of all new prisons. (Paragraph 7.4)

STANDARD 8

Prisoners are allowed into the open air for at least one hour a day every day.

Recommendation 13: HMP Low Moss should ensure suitable areas for drying clothing used by prisoners accessing time in the open air are provided. (Paragraph 8.7)

STANDARD 9

Personal clothing is in decent condition, washed frequently and fits.

Recommendation 14: HMP Low Moss should ensure that a sufficient stock of better quality tee-shirts for issue to prisoners is procured and maintained. (Paragraph 9.1)

STANDARD 10

Bedding is supplied and laundered at frequent intervals.

Recommendation 15: SPS should review the specification of their contract for the procurement of pillows for prisoners' use when it is renewed in April 2014. (Paragraph 10.1)

STANDARD 11

Sanitary arrangements take account of health, hygiene and human dignity.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 12

Food is adequate for health, varied and religiously and culturally appropriate.

Recommendation 16: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the arrangements for storing and serving breakfast cereals are safe and hygienic. (Paragraph 12.4)

Recommendation 17: HMP Low Moss to consider moving to the alternative trolley design. (Paragraph 12.6)

Recommendation 18: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners have the means to properly wash their cutlery and crockery. (Paragraph 12.8)

STANDARD 13

Respect is the underlying basis of all interactions between staff and prisoners

No recommendations.

STANDARD 14

Security measures such as searching are carried out with regard to the protection of human dignity.

Recommendation 19: HMP Low Moss should ensure that all rub down searches are carried out to the same recognised standard. (Paragraph 14.2)

STANDARD 15

Family visits are given high priority in terms of frequency, length and quality and are not restricted as part of any disciplinary or control process.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 16

Visitors are well treated

No recommendations.

STANDARD 17

Visits take place in the most relaxed environment compatible with security.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 18

Telephone contact is made as easy as possible.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 19

Letter contact is made as easy as possible

No recommendations.

STANDARD 20

Staff are aware of their duty of care to give prisoners their legal rights. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy and meet their obligations under it promptly.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 21

Staff are aware of their duty to observe the Human Rights of prisoners. They know what these rights are. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 22

Staff are aware of their duty to treat prisoners in accordance with fairness and natural justice. They know what this involves. They accept the legitimacy of that duty and meet their obligations under it promptly.

Recommendation 20: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the complaint process flowchart is posted for prisoners to see in all Residential areas. (Paragraph 22.1)

Recommendation 21: HMP Low Moss should ensure prisoners do not attend court in prison issue clothing. (Paragraph 22.4)

STANDARD 23

Segregation is used sparingly and in accordance with procedures.

Recommendation 22: HMP Low Moss should ensure that those cells occupied during the dirty protest are cleaned and made good. (Paragraph 23.7)

Recommendation 23: The Scottish Prison Service should ensure that a national protocol for dealing with prisoners on dirty protests is designed and implemented across the estate. (Paragraph 23.8)

PART 3 - OPPORTUNITY FOR SELF-IMPROVEMENT AND ACCESS TO SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES

STANDARD 24

The regime of the prison encourages prisoners to make the most of their time there and to exercise responsibility.

Recommendation 24: HMP Low Moss should ensure prisoners attend the Link Centre for induction when required to do so. (Paragraph 24.3)

Recommendation 25: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the Positive Impact Programme (PIP) assessment documentation is uploaded to PR2 to be shared with others working with the individual prisoner. (Paragraph 24.6)

Recommendation 26: HMP Low Moss should ensure that the Positive Impact Programme (PIP) is fully evaluated and those evaluation recommendations integrated into the future programme. (Paragraph 24.8)

Recommendation 27: HMP Low Moss should ensure that PIAC meetings are held on a regular basis. (Paragraph 24.13)

Recommendation 28: HMP Low Moss should ensure that minutes of PIAC meetings are displayed on prisoners' notice boards. (Paragraph 24.15)

STANDARD 25

A full day's out of cell activities such as work, education, leisure and cultural pursuits, is available for seven days a week.

Recommendation 29: HMP Low Moss should ensure that work spaces operate at their optimum capacity at all times. (Paragraph 25.2)

Recommendation 30: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners involved in food distribution are given the appropriate training. (Paragraph 25.4)

Recommendation 31: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners are given advance information of their timetabled activities. (Paragraph 25.6)

STANDARD 26

The programme of work and related training focuses on equipping prisoners for employment on release.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 27

A broad and relevant education programme is available.

Recommendation 32: HMP Low Moss should review the allocation of gym sessions for those prisoners involved in full time education. (Paragraph 27.21)

STANDARD 28

A range of interventions is in place to encourage prisoners to address those behaviours which may contribute to their offending.

Recommendation 33: HMP Low Moss should ensure that end of course reports are delivered within relevant timescales. (Paragraph 28.4)

STANDARD 29

There is a programme of cultural and voluntary activities.

Recommendation 34: HMP Low Moss should establish links to local authority library service. (Paragraph 29.2)

Recommendation 35: HMP Low Moss should provide greater access to the Library. (Paragraph 29.2)

STANDARD 30

Opportunities to practise their religion are available to all prisoners.

Recommendation 36: HMP Low Moss should ensure that prisoners attendance at religious services is not at the expense of access to other entitlements. (Paragraph 30.4)

STANDARD 31

Suitable arrangements to enable prisoners to buy a range of personal and other items that meet prisoners' needs are in place and available and accessible as necessary.

No recommendations.

STANDARD 32

Health services of a high quality are available to all who need them.

Recommendation 37: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that they have a full complement of staff within HMP Low Moss. (Paragraph 32.9)

Recommendation 38: NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde should ensure that prisoners' relevant health care information is transferred to the appropriate health care provider on his release. (Paragraph 32.14)

Recommendation 39: The NHS should ensure that all medical notes are securely transferred. (Paragraph 32.17)

STANDARD 33

Addictions are dealt with the way most likely to be effective and when they conflict, treatment takes priority over security measures as far as possible.

Recommendation 40: HM Low Moss should increase the number of non-clinical drugs tests carried out. (Paragraph 33.7)

STANDARD 34

The prison has a policy on links with families and with the local community

and allocates staff time to implement it.

Recommendation 41: HMP Low Moss should give consideration to including a family representative onto the Children and Families strategy group. (Paragraph 34.3)

STANDARD 35

Arrangements are made for prisoners to leave with somewhere appropriate to live, healthcare, continuity assured, a chance to find work and build social links.

No recommendations.

GOOD PRACTICE

PART 1 - SAFETY

Good Practice 1: Starting the process of induction into prison life (when a prisoner is allocated the FNIC Unit) out with the residential area in Reception, is positive as confidentiality is ensured, the environment allows the prisoner to be more relaxed and the Officer is free from the usual distractions of the house block. (Paragraph 1.14)

Good Practice 2: When a prisoner is allocated to the PIP Unit, an Officer and a 'prisoner mentor' from that area attend the Reception. (Paragraph 1.15)

Good Practice 3: Each contingency plan examined is set out as a Standard Operating Procedure in checklist format, version controlled and with a review date. (Paragraph 1.22)

PART 2: DECENCY, HUMANITY AND RESPECT FOR LEGAL RIGHTS

Good Practice 4: Throughout the inspection Officers qualified to deliver sports and games, facilitated football matches on a regular basis in the evenings. This provision is in addition to activities facilitated by Physical Training (PT) Instructors. These additional sessions are well attended and viewed in a very positive manner by prisoners and staff. (Paragraph 8.6)

Good Practice 5: The laundry process in place in the prison ensures all filled laundry bags are sealed and the seal number recorded in the house block prior to being sent to the laundry. The laundry officer then confirms and records that the bag and seal are intact prior to and after the laundering is complete. (Paragraph 9.6)

Good Practice 6: Staff and prisoners are appropriately trained in food safety, hygiene, cleaning and catering skills. At the time of inspection there were 29 prisoners employed in the kitchen, all of whom were engaged in purposeful work. There is a separate training kitchen with the first group of five prisoners having successfully completing a fifteen week Scottish Vocational Qualification (SVQ) course at the time of inspection. The next group of prisoners have been selected from those working in the kitchen, who on completion of their SVQ will return to their role and train others. (Paragraph 12.2)

Good Practice 7: Temperatures are carefully monitored within the kitchen and up to the point of placing the food in the heated trolleys prior to delivery. When the trolleys are awaiting collection outside the house blocks these are connected to the electrical supply to maintain their heat. (Paragraph 12.6)

Good Practice 8: The positive ethos aspired to in the SPS Offender Outcome Number Six is evident in every element of visiting arrangements in Low Moss, from the point of first contact by visitors themselves and on to any follow-up. (Paragraph 15.1)

Good Practice 9: As part of the PIP, a separate induction visit is arranged for the prisoner as soon as possible after admission by the FCO. This visit begins with a 20‑30 minute informative overview presented by the FCO and a prison management officer (PMO) from Clyde House level 1 where the PIP is delivered. The prisoner and visitor(s) are then able to continue their visit while the FCO and PMO are on hand to provide any further information and advice as required. (Paragraph 15.3)

Good Practice 10: Early evening visit sessions are dedicated to 'children's visits' where the main purpose of the visit is to allow fathers to engage in quality activities with their children. As these visits take place directly after the end of the school day, visitors and prisoners are provided with sandwiches and soft drinks. Staff encourage fathers to take an interest in their children's homework or to play with them in the dedicated play area. A Play Leader is also available during these sessions to encourage and develop positive parenting skills. (Paragraph 17.3)

PART 3. OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-IMPROVEMENT AND ACCESS TO SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES

Good Practice 11: The Low Moss Community Voluntary Group are provided with a training package, given prison ID cards and are welcomed as part of the staff group. This has led to a positive ethos between the prison and the local community. (Paragraph 34.5)

Inspection Team

Hugh Monro, Chief Inspector

Margaret Brown, Deputy Chief Inspector

Tony Martin, Inspector

Alan Forman, Business Manager

David Thomson, Healthcare Inspector, Healthcare Improvement Scotland

Dr John Bowditch, Education Inspector, Education Scotland

Stewart Maxwell, Education Inspector, Education Scotland

Sharanne Findlay, Guest Inspector

Scott McLellan, Guest Inspector

Derek McLeod, Guest Inspector