HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland: Annual Report 2018-19

Annex A: Annual Independent Prison Monitoring Summary Reports

Map - Scotlands Prisons

Region 1 - Summary Reports

HMP Glenochil

HMP Glenochil
King O’Muir Road
Tuillibody
Clackmannanshire
FK10 3AD

HMP Glenochil

IPM Findings

During this reporting year, there was a significant increase in the prison population in HMP Glenochil.

Population: The increased population placed extra pressure on all aspects of the prison regime, including partner services such as healthcare. Cell sharing increased, and as a consequence of national pressure on spaces for those requiring protection, a small number of non-offence protection prisoners were being held in HMP Glenochil. The establishment did not have a proper regime for non-offence protection prisoners, and although efforts were made to find appropriate purposeful activities, the impact was that non-offence protection prisoners were being locked in their cells for extended periods of time.

High number of requests: The Monitoring Team received a high numbers of requests from prisoners wishing to speak to them. Common themes were healthcare provision and food. The Monitoring Team will consider how to improve the balance between responding to requests and carrying out wider observed practice.

Separation and Reintegration Unit: The number of prisoners being held in the SRU remained consistently high, and some prisoner requests related to their concerns about how long they had been held there. Paperwork checked by IPMs confirmed the prisoners were lawfully held there. The Monitoring Team welcomed the introduction of a closed visits area, which will improve access to prisoners held in the SRU.

Changes and Improvements

Closed visits area in the Separation and Reintegration Unit: At times, IPMs reported it being difficult to see prisoners in the SRU, due to other demands on staff time such as staffing the Orderly Room. The introduction of a closed visits area in the SRU is welcomed as this should alleviate some of the obstacles. Early indications are that access to prisoners in this area has improved.

Equality and Diversity Group: The work of this group is being reinvigorated and an IPM was asked to join as an observer. The Monitoring Team thought this was a positive development.

Social care provision: The area dedicated to prisoners with mobility issues or requiring social care was an area of good practice that the team will continue to highlight.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Restricted regimes: The regime currently in place for non-offence protection prisoners gave the Monitoring Team cause for concern, and IPMs will continue to spend time looking at this.

Population Pressures: In acknowledging this is a national issue, the impact at HMP Glenochil seems particularly acute. Monitors will continue to observe the effect of increasing populations.

Inspection Findings: When the report is published following the recent inspection of the establishment, the team will put together a monitoring plan to follow up on both good practice and areas requiring improvement.

HMP YOI Grampian

HMP YOI Grampian
South Road
Peterhead
AB42 2YY

HMP YOI Grampian

IPM Findings

Staffing: The greatest concern relates to ongoing staffing problems. Staff reported to IPMs that morale was low due to low staff numbers. Staff had less time to develop positive relationships with prisoners, prisoners experienced cutbacks to recreation time, and a previously high level of cleaning activity was reduced.

Healthcare: A significant proportion of prisoner requests related to healthcare and within those, around half related to medication. It should be noted that in each case IPMs did not find NHS staff to be at fault. Rather, prisoners were looking to have medication changed, or to seek information relating to appointments, etc. Healthcare staffing fluctuated over the reporting period, at times falling to a concerning level.

Effective, courteous and humane exercise of authority: IPMs observed both the Orderly Room and Internal Complaints Committee processes on a number of occasions, and concluded these processes were delivered in a fair manner, with prisoners being given clear explanations for decisions being made.

Prisoner/Family relationships: The prison had a very positive approach to encouraging and maintaining prisoner/family relationships, clearly going to great lengths to facilitate family visits. The Visit Room was clean and welcoming, and had good facilities for children. However, recently the funding for the Family Hub was cut, which was a concern.

Changes and Improvements

Purposeful activity: Concerns around a more restricted regime for protection prisoners were raised by IPMs during the reporting period. Over time, IPMs noted an improvement, actively witnessing protection prisoners accessing exercise, work, and education opportunities.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Staffing levels: Impact of the SPS staffing levels on delivery of elements of the regime (access to: work; education; exercise), across different prisoner groups. Also, the impact of healthcare staffing levels on waiting times.

HMP Inverness

HMP Inverness
Duffy Drive
Inverness
IV2 3HH

HMP Inverness

IPM Findings

Effective, courteous and humane exercise of authority: The challenge of a rising prisoner population required changes to the management of different prisoner groups over the reporting period. Offence-protection prisoners from E Hall, who had previously reported receiving abuse from other prisoners while accessing their food in B Hall, were moved to this hall and managed there under a different (apparently more restrictive) regime to accommodate other prisoner groups around the prison. Offence‑protection prisoners were eventually moved back to E Hall.

IPMs also noted that the practice of moving offence-protection prisoners within sight and earshot of non-offence-protection prisoners (for example at visits) had the potential to lead to further abuse and intimidation. IPMs suggested that more should be done to ensure the separation of these prisoner groups to help prevent any type of abuse.

Personal safety: IPMs found evidence that the SPS Talk to Me Strategy, for identifying and managing prisoners at risk of self-harm and suicide, was being applied effectively.

Mental Health: IPMs had concerns around the level of healthcare staffing, particularly around mental health provision.

Changes and Improvements

Effective, courteous and humane exercise of authority: Prisoners complimented staff on treating them well, helping to resolve any issues they might raise quickly and sympathetically. IPMs observed prisoners with additional mobility needs being well supported. Management plans recognised such prisoners’ needs, medical conditions, etc. Prisoners expressed satisfaction with the way in which their additional needs were being met. Therefore, IPMs concluded that support for prisoners with additional needs was appropriate.

Decency: Despite the age and size of the prison, which is restrictive in comparison to larger prisons, staff did well to ensure that prisoners had access to work, exercise, education and healthcare.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Rising population: The impact of the rising population on delivery of elements of the regime (access to: work; education; exercise), across different prisoner groups.

The fabric of the building: Further assessment of how the age and size of the building may hinder improvements to work opportunities, exercise, etc.

HMP Open Estate

HMP Open Estate
Longforgan 
Nr Dundee
DD2 5HL

HMP Open Estate

IPM Findings

Mental health provision: In one particular case, IPMs were informed that a prisoner had been moved back to closed conditions due to his mental health needs. It is understood that this was appropriate from a risk management perspective. However, IPMs had concerns generally around the capacity to provide mental health support at the prison. NHS Tayside responded to say that the mental health provision was being managed in prison healthcare contingency meetings and plans.

The prison operated a policy of moving any prisoner identified as being at risk of self-harm or suicide back to closed conditions. As a result, there was a concern that prisoners may be less open to discussing such problems, and therefore not receive the help they require.

Autism awareness: IPMs were concerned that officers may not have sufficient awareness of the issues facing people with autism, and similar conditions. These prisoners would benefit from officers having a greater understanding of their behaviours.

Purposeful activity: IPMs found the community placements team to be enthusiastic and, similarly, that prisoners were enthusiastic about the opportunity to undertake such placements. There was a high number of community placements. However, some prisoners stated that the range of placements on offer was limited, and not relevant to the type of work they might seek upon release.

Transition to the community: IPMs observed prisoners being released. The relevant paperwork was to hand, they were treated with courtesy and time was taken to explain the process. It appeared to be a process delivered in a very calm manner. This was welcomed, given that release from prison can be a relatively stressful time.

Changes and Improvements

Effective, courteous and humane exercise of authority: IPMs saw evidence of how dedicated staff were to the Personal Officer role. One positive consequence of the prison being under-populated was that officers had more time to spend on the role, which of course benefited prisoners, but could also increase the officers’ job satisfaction.

Substance misuse: IPMs were pleased to note that the substance misuse drop-in service had been made more visible and accessible, and was proving popular.

Healthcare: The recent change to how medication was ordered (using an external pharmacy) had led to a much smoother operation, and less confusion about medication for those going on home leave. It also freed up nursing staff for other duties, all of which was encouraging.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Training/work opportunities: The assessment of the training and work opportunities made available to prisoners, and the extent to which this matches prisoner expectations and ambitions after release.

Substance misuse: The impact of substance misuse and how staff manage this.

Staffing: The healthcare staffing levels’ impact on service delivery.

HMP Perth

HMP Perth
3 Edinburgh Road
Perth
PH2 8AT

HMP Perth

IPM Findings

Rising population/staffing levels: The prison population had significantly increased. There was, therefore greater demand for work opportunities, programme places, other facilities and resources, etc. There is a concern that this could lead to reduced opportunities for prisoners to access these, leading to increased frustration for prisoners. Staff were working hard to ensure an adequate regime continued to operate, however a significantly increased level of sickness absence could exacerbate the problem.

Substance misuse: There were a number of instances of substance misuse reported by staff to IPMs over the reporting period, including ‘unknown substances’, which were hard to detect and costly to test for, and misuse of prescribed medication. A policy was in place, whereby any prisoner suspected of being ‘under the influence’ had their medication stopped immediately (to avoid potential overdose/further harm), and their situation was reviewed by a multi-disciplinary team. Prisoners complained about this process to IPMs on a number of occasions. However, HMIPS recognises that prisoners’ safety is the driver of this policy.

Healthcare: Low healthcare staffing levels affected healthcare service delivery and healthcare complaint response times.

Management of risk: IPMs observed the Risk Management Team (RMT) process and were of the opinion that each prisoner was given a fair hearing. All staff involved appeared to be familiar with each case and all options were considered to find the right outcome for the welfare of the prisoner.

Effective, courteous and humane exercise of authority: IPMs spent time in the SRU talking with staff and prisoners, and witnessed staff working with prisoners in a very patient, friendly, and helpful way, including in the face of hostile behaviour from some prisoners.

Changes and Improvements

Healthcare: SPS and NHS staff are working to make improvements to the delivery of healthcare, including addressing staffing levels. A significant percentage of the population required to take their medication under supervision, and this adversely affected the smooth running of the regime, for example prisoners arriving to work late. Recent changes to the process for delivering supervised medication sought to address this.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Rising prison population: Impact of rising population and SPS staffing levels on delivery of elements of the regime (access to: work; education; exercise), across different prisoner groups.

Staffing: Impact of Healthcare staffing levels on waiting times and complaints response times.

Substance misuse: Level and impact of substance misuse.

Region 2 - Summary Reports 

HMP Addiewell

HMP Addiewell
9 Station Road
Addiewell
West Lothian
EH55 8QF

HMP Addiewell

IPM Findings

High number of requests: HMP Addiewell continued to receive a high numbers of requests, and this created obstacles for the Monitoring Team carrying out wider observed practice. To try to redress the balance, the Monitoring Team aimed to complete one supplementary visit per month concentrating on broader aspects of life in the establishment.

Healthcare: Healthcare remains a consistent issue raised with IPMs, in particular around access to a dentist and the impact on prisoners of the changes to prescribing and classification guidelines for certain medications.

Staffing: Staffing levels were highlighted as an area of concern by the IPMs throughout the year. The Monitoring Team was pleased to note this being picked up during the inspection, and welcomed the immediate action taken by the prison to address this.

Equality and Diversity Group: One of the Monitoring Team IPMs is a member of the Equality and Diversity Group. Unfortunately, the group had not met for approximately one year, which gave the Monitoring Team some cause for concern.

Changes and Improvements

Staffing: The independent prison monitoring system was well used and understood by prisoners and staff. The Monitoring Team would like to thank the staff they come into contact with, who are mostly open, friendly and helpful to both IPMs and prisoners.

Halls: Certain halls were noted by IPMs as being particularly lively, with a number of incidents being reported to them. Again, IPMs were pleased with the response of the Management Team and the changes made to staff deployment.

Smoking ban: The smoking ban was well introduced.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Complaints process: Some prisoners stated a lack of confidence in the complaints process, suggesting that complaints may go missing. Whilst there was no evidence this was the case, and staff on halls spoken to about complaints were generally aware of the individual prisoners and their issues. IPMs would like to see a better system of recording and tracking of complaints, and the Monitoring Team will continue to monitor this.

Staffing: IPMs welcomed the recruitment of extra staff, but understood the challenges bringing in large numbers of new staff can bring. The Monitoring Team will continue to monitor the impact they are having.

HMP YOI Cornton Vale

HMP YOI Cornton Vale
Cornton Road
Stirling
FK9 5NU

HMP YOI Cornton Vale

IPM Findings

The new establishment: This year has seen a lot of change at Cornton Vale. Building for the new national establishment started and IPMs welcome the improvements that this will ultimately bring. The establishment did not close for building work to commence; it is ongoing whilst the current prison regime continues to run. This created challenges in terms of continuity of core services, but IPMs concluded the establishment had met them as much as possible.

Continuity of regimes: The Monitoring Team were keen to establish that a full regime continued to be offered to all populations despite the ongoing building work. They were pleased to find that was the case. Access to purposeful activity, visits, time outside, progression and healthcare were all facilitated in a way that did not have an adverse impact on the population.

Independent Living Units (ILUs): A significant impact of the building work was the reconfiguration of the ILUs. Originally, the provision was in houses just outside the perimeter fence, but the new plans required the houses to be demolished, which required a new space to be found for the ILUs. This new space was in Skye House, which unfortunately was within the site of the main prison, resulting in changes to the way the service operated. Significant efforts were made by the establishment to minimise the impact of the changes, but women in the ILUs do not have the same levels of independence at the present time.

Transport: Concerns were raised with the IPMs about the amount of time some women were spending in GeoAmey prisoner transport vehicles, in transit to the establishment. Amongst other things, there were issues about access to appropriate and dignified sanitation, along with the time some were arriving at the establishment and accessing healthcare.

Population: In common with all establishments, Cornton Vale experienced population increases and subsequent pressure on the regime. The IPMs concluded that there were still too many women being incarcerated in Cornton Vale that had complex mental health issues and would be better accommodated in a different environment.

Changes and Improvements

Visits Area: Women reported concerns about the cleanliness of the Visit Room, especially the area that was for children. The establishment took positive action by arranging for the area to be deep cleaned, and for a revised cleaning schedule to be introduced.

Team Sally Initiative: The Monitoring Team were particularly impressed by the Team Sally Initiative, launched in June 2018 to support the implementation of smoke-free prisons. The education run group addressed issues such as smoking cessation, mental health, healthy eating, exercise and social interactions through ‘Team Sally’, events, which were supported and facilitated by multi-agency working. The women were given a membership folder containing the ‘Team Sally’ calendar, a pedometer, a sheet of challenges, a mindfulness CD, colouring puzzles with colouring pencils, and a journal for recording thoughts. This summer, 34 SQA Awards will be issued to women as a result of their involvement. ‘Team Sally’ also run a choir, a book club and a fitness club. Recognised externally, Team Sally recently won the Partnership Award category at the prestigious Herald Higher Education Awards. IPMs think it is a model other establishments could learn from.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Continuity of regimes: The Monitoring Team will continue to monitor that a full regime is offered to women during each phase of the rebuild.

Ross House and Dumyat: These are areas where some of the most challenging and/or vulnerable women are held. The Monitoring Team will continue to spend time in these areas on a regular basis.

Transport: The reports IPMs are receiving relating to the amount of time and the conditions women are experiencing whilst under escort in the GeoAmey vans is an area of ongoing concern, and one the Monitoring Team will continue to monitor.

HMP Edinburgh

HMP Edinburgh
3 Stenhouse Road
Edinburgh
EH11 3LN

HMP Edinburgh

IPM Findings

The smoking ban: The implementation of the smoking ban was well managed. It had a very positive impact on the air quality within the prison. Staff noted some negative impacts, and anecdotally talked of a slight increase in violence and the number of prisoners requesting protection or avoiding association.

Orderly room: During observed practice visits, the orderly room was noted as being well run and the staff were courteous. During follow up meetings with the prisoners involved, they said they felt the process had been fair. However, there were concerns raised about the responses provided to complaints, where further investigation would have been welcomed by IPMs.

Older prisoners: Older prisoners talked to IPMs about issues relating to adaptations, with some feeling that they did not have the equipment they needed in their cell. Issues related to hearing and memory loss were also raised, with people reporting that they needed more support on the halls.

Regime issues: Regime related matters included the number of visit spaces available for some populations and insufficient time to have breakfast on the days some attend religious services.

Personal Officer Scheme: The Personal Officer Scheme continued to receive mixed reviews, with some reporting very positive relationships/support and other telling IPMs they did not have a Personal Officer.

Changes and Improvements

The Visitor Centre: IPMs found the Visitor Centre to be well run and staff were extremely approachable. Individuals were treated with dignity and respect, and in many cases, a ‘holistic’ approach was taken by supporting people in a wide range of issues, not directly related to their prison visit. It provided refreshments, and from donations was able to hand out bags of food to visitors. Staff were available to provide support to visitors, answer concerns and assist new visitors to understand the visiting arrangements during what was a stressful time for them.

Barnardo’s Scotland made some structural alterations, such as lowering the reception and the booking-in desk to make it less institutional. They also worked in partnership with a number of organisations such as Families Outside, Four Square Housing, Early Years Scotland and Age UK.

Hermiston Hall: The development of Hermiston Hall, such as use of the basement room as an area for group work/recreation for older prisoners was welcomed, and IPMs look forward to seeing the impact as they begin to be used.

Hospice provision: An area of good practice noted was the partnership the establishment had formed with Marie Curie and their hospice provision in Edinburgh. The Monitoring Team concluded that positive work was being done to educate both organisations about the work they do, and to ensure as far as is possible a respectful and dignified service was offered to anyone moving from HMP Edinburgh to a Marie Curie hospice.

Regime: A reorganisation of the establishment took place, moving prisoner populations to provide a better regime. This had a positive impact on the number of people experiencing very restricted regimes.

Street Soccer Scotland: IPMs saw a programme run by Street Soccer Scotland, which was a positive intervention for the participants, and were pleased to see the agency returning to provide a similar programme for women.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Rising population: The overcrowding across the prison estate, combined with staff absences, continues to have a detrimental impact. Changes to the regime and the moving of certain populations was positive, it was noted that areas such as progression were being impacted. Staff in the SRU noted that moving prisoners, both to other establishments and back in to the normal halls was becoming increasingly difficult. Concern about the impact of NPS remains, although the situation appears to have stabilised.

Supervised Medication Dispensing: Officers reported that too much time was sometimes taken up supervising medication, meaning they cannot interact with the prisoners as much as they would like. The change in prescribing guidelines for certain classes of medication are having a big impact on the prison, and on those prisoners affected.

HMP YOI Polmont

HMP YOI Polmont
Brightons
Falkirk
FK2 0AB

HMP YOI Polmont

IPM Findings

This has been a challenging year for the establishment. Despite the pressure, the IPMs concluded that although areas requiring improvement had been identified, the establishment continued to look to develop its practice and provision.

Purposeful activity: In the second-half of the year, IPMs noted some increased uptake in purposeful activity, but overall the Monitoring Team felt numbers were still relatively low. As a result, many prisoners, particularly young men, spent more time locked up than the Monitoring Team would like to see.

Induction: IPMs saw evidence that induction took place, but it was a particular concern that there was no formal induction for people who are held on remand.

Separation and Reintegration Unit (SRU): Some of the most challenging and/or vulnerable young men were held in the SRU. Any women that require to be held in a SRU are moved to Cornton Vale. IPMs spent a lot of time in the SRU and noted that under 18s were often held there, which is contrary to guidance from the NPM. IPMs noted what they felt was good practice whereby a staff member from the adult estate visited a young man in advance of him moving there.

Visits: The establishment responded positively to feedback from the Monitoring Team about visits by completing a targeted piece of work on perceptions of the length of visits.

Changes and Improvements

Displaced population: During the year, the Monitoring Team raised the issue of a number of young men being held in areas that could not offer them a full regime. One example being a number of protection prisoners being displaced to a mainstream hall, resulting in them being locked in their cells for long periods of time. The establishment took a proactive approach and reconfigured the population to ensure this was no longer the case. Feedback to the Monitoring Team from both prisoners and staff was positive.

Restorative justice: This is not a new initiative but something the Monitoring Team felt was an example of good practice. Estimated figures shared with the team was that the service had a 90% success rate in terms of differences being resolved, which culminated in people being removed from the ‘enemies list’.

Psychology advice line: A telephone line has been setup for staff to speak directly to psychology should they have concerns or require advice about a prisoner.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Access to purposeful activities: This is an area monitors will continue to observe along with access to time outside.

SRU: Given the complexity/vulnerability of some prisoners held there, IPMs will continue to visit on a regular basis.

Inspection findings: Following the publication of the recent inspection report of the establishment and the Mental Health Review, the Monitoring Team have put together a monitoring plan to follow up on both good practice and areas requiring improvement.

HMP Shotts

HMP Shotts
Canthill
Shotts
ML7 4LE

HMP Shotts

This year the Monitoring Team managed to increase the amount of observed practice completed, which they think gives a more rounded evidence base to report from. That said, the Monitoring Team continue to receive regular requests from prisoners to speak to an IPM.

IPM Findings

Preparation for liberation: Shotts is an establishment for people serving long-term sentences. As a result, the expectation is that few are liberated directly from the establishment. However, the Monitoring Team found that numbers were higher than they would have expected. Although most of those liberated directly will be subject to licence conditions, some will not meaning they are released directly into the community after serving a long-term sentence.

Throughcare support: Shotts does not have any throughcare support for prisoners. To benefit all those liberated directly, work is being undertaken to try to ensure that those liberated have access to bank accounts, and that they can get citizen cards for identification purposes. In addition, optional multi-disciplinary meetings are now offered if someone is being liberated without licence.

Complaints: The Monitoring Team raised some issues about how complaints received were recorded and responded to. The establishment responded positively by changing the process and reinforced that all official complaints received should be recorded in PR2.

Escorted day absence: Several prisoner requests to speak to an IPM centred on this issue. In looking into the concerns, it was concluded that the establishment had acted in accordance with Prison Rules, but there may be a strategic issue in terms of consistency across establishments. This has been raised with the Deputy Chief Inspector of Prisons.

Personal Officer Scheme: The Monitoring Team think that on balance this works well in HMP Shotts. Each Personal Officer has a maximum of six prisoners to work with, and there is a booklet that clearly explains the role and its expectations. Quality assurance is built into the process with immediate line managers checking entries, and senior management also checking entries prior to RMT hearings for example.

Changes and Improvements

Recovery Café: The Monitoring Team were pleased to see the introduction of a Recovery Café in the establishment this year. IPMs have been told it is being well received.

Education: When contractual changes were initially introduced, concerns were raised about the new arrangements. IPMs have spent time this year completing indepth observations and concluded there had been improvements in:

  • Numeracy - through contextualised learning. This was delivered in the bike shed. An evaluation was completed and there was evidence this work was ongoing. 
  • SQA presentations - there had been a decline in the number of SQA units achieved in 2018. With the Staff Team now almost at full complement, 99 units achieved in the last six-months was encouraging. 
  • Observation of activities - IPMs observed Art, Cell Block Science and IT. All were felt to be of a high quality with positive feedback from participants. Cell Block Science was felt to be a very engaging session, with everyone involved and interested. 

Joint working: The Monitoring Team received calls from staff via the IPM Freephone on behalf of prisoners, or asking monitors directly to speak to someone they feel might be struggling. The Monitoring Team think this is positive and encourage its continuation.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

Healthcare: Concerns about healthcare were raised both via prisoner requests and wider observed practice. Issues include provision for people who have long-term conditions. This will be followed-up, and monitoring will continue.

Region 3 - Summary Reports

HMP Barlinnie

HMP Barlinnie
81 Lee Avenue
Riddrie
G33 2QX

HMP Barlinnie

IPM Findings

Reception area: The physical limitations of the reception area remains a concern. During visits, graffiti was observed in the holding cells. The holding cells have been raised as a concern by HMIPS since the 2003 inspection report. IPMs think the SPS and the Scottish Government should address this as a matter of urgency. Whilst efforts had been made by the prison to minimise the time any prisoner spends in the holding cells, IPMs do not believe that there is any acceptable length of time for someone to be held in a space that small.

Rising population: The population of the prison has continued to increase during this period with associated challenges for prisoners, staff and management. The IPMs believe the population should be reduced drastically to offer the service to the prisoners and the wider community that it should.

NPS: NPS continues to be a concern. Staff on several halls talked about the number of incidents they have had to deal with, and the impact prisoners having to attend hospital is having. IPMs appreciate the difficulty the prison has restricting access to NPS, and the difficulty staff have dealing with the fallout.

Changes and Improvements

Purposeful activity: The Education Centre appeared to be relatively busy. Gym provision was noted to be good with excellent facilities that are, for the most part, accessible to most prisoners. Work sheds were noted to be functioning well, with prisoners engaged and a good allocation of tasks.

Visit hall: The visit’s hall was reported to be conducive to a welcoming, family friendly atmosphere with improved provision for younger and older children alike. Staff are watchful and vigilant without being invasive.

Smoking ban: The implementation of the smoking ban continues to be well managed.

Staffing: IPMs found the prison to be very well organised and well run. The staff were generally helpful and knowledgeable, and it is to their credit that they are managing to cope with the acute overcrowding with which they are faced.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

The reception area: The conditions in the reception and admission areas will remain the primary focus of the IPMs.

Population management: The severe levels of overcrowding and the impact this has on prisoners and staff alike will be monitored by IPMs.

HMP Dumfries

HMP Dumfries
Terregles Street
Dumfries
DG2 9AX

HMP Dumfries

IPM Findings

Effective, courteous and humane exercise of authority: IPMs noted throughout the year that residential areas appear to function smoothly. Monitors have observed route movements where prisoners are spoken to with civility and respect. IPMs continue to report the efforts made by staff to ensure that visits are a positive experience for prisoners and their families and friends.

Purposeful activity: IPMs noted the underutilisation of the Links Centre and have raised this with prison management. Monitors reported the excellent condition and maintenance of the gardens during the summer months and also the welcomed the regular family days that have taken place around grounds during this time.

Health and wellbeing: The Health Centre has been visited regularly this year and was reported to be efficient and well run with very few delays in appointments. A small sample of prisoners were asked about their experience with health services and expressed their satisfaction with all aspects of treatment.

Changes and Improvements

Progression: The implementation of the new case management model will be monitored carefully. Two new psychologists were working in HMP Dumfries on a weekly basis as of June 2019.

Decency: A Hall has been completely refurbished as has reception. The Visits Room has also been upgraded with new soft furnishings and improvements made to the children’s play area.

Population: The prison operating capacity has increased from 176 to 195. The increase has not had any significant impact on the regime, though the short-term and remand population have been relocated within the establishment.

Short-term prisoner review: IPMs have been updated on plans to review the regime for short-term prisoners, possibly in partnership with various community organisations. This review will take place in late 2019.

Key aspects for Continued Monitoring

IPMs will continue to monitor the use of the Links Centre within the establishment and seek to monitor the proposed improvements to the regime for short-term prisoners.

HMP Greenock

HMP Greenock
Old Inverkip Road
Greenock
PA16 9AJ

HMP Greenock

IPM Findings

Decency: IPMs monitored decency in some depth throughout the year. They reported that the staff do a commendable job in ensuring the prison functions well despite the site, age, and deteriorating conditions of some of the buildings. A recent infection control audit conducted by NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, saw the prison achieve 99% compliance. New carpets have been laid in Chriswell House.

Purposeful activity: IPMs continue to note that sometimes staffing could be finely balanced, with some purposeful activity being closed due to sickness. IPMs were disappointed to note the delays in the new Life Skills Centre being fully operational.

Progression: IPMs received several requests about progression from prisoners throughout the year and note that changes to eligibility criteria have impacted on the use of HDC. Some prisoners perceived that their progression could be delayed by a lack of psychology provision.

Changes and Improvements

Effective use of authority: IPMs continue to reflect positively on interactions between staff and prisoners, highlighting officers welcoming nature at reception and visits area in particular.

Lawful and transparent custody: IPMs have spent time in reception where there appear to be efficient processes in place. Orderly Room procedures have been observed in Darroch and provide evidence of transparent and humane exercise of authority

Decency: A monthly estates meeting has been established with SPS to discuss the potential for improvements to the fabric of the building. A business case has been submitted for new cell furnishings in the establishment.

Purposeful activity: Some life skills are currently being delivered in the Links Centre as funding is not yet in place to complete the Life Skills Centre. There has been some joint working with the local authority to further improve library services. Various initiatives will be looked at to improve purposeful activity over the coming months.

Progression: There will be additional psychology provision in the establishment from June 2019 onwards. Prison staff will continue to communicate with prisoners regarding their progression plans.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

IPMs will continue to monitor progression transitions from custody to the community in HMP Greenock, in both CIUs and Chriswell House. IPMs will also continue to monitor the uptake of purposeful activity in HMP Greenock.

HMP Kilmarnock

HMP Kilmarnock
Mauchline Road
Kilmarnock
KA1 5AA

HMP Kilmarnock

IPM Findings

Lawful and transparent custody: The SRU was noted to be busy this year although staff appear confident in their work in this area. Adjudications were observed to be running smoothly despite the complexities involved in managing some of the cases.

Personal safety: IPMs have noted a greater number of prisoners on protection at times during this period with the subsequent impact on the regime. It was also noted that a detailed review of the Safer Custody arrangements had taken place across the establishment.

Health and wellbeing: IPMs understand from NHS, Serco staff, and prisoners that prevalence of NPS continues to be a concern for the health and wellbeing of everyone in the establishment.

Staffing: IPMs note that absence levels and retention of staff are continuing to cause some pressure.

Changes and Improvements

Health and wellbeing: IPMs met with healthcare managers and welcomed the new layout of the Health Centre. Waiting times have been good this year although this may increase with the rise in population.

Population: HMP Kilmarnock have taken an additional 96 prisoners this year, taking their capacity to nearly 600.

Personal safety: IPMs welcomed the formation of the Violence Reduction Group in the establishment, led by a dedicated Violence Reduction Co‑ordinator. IPMs have met with the group during their visits and been advised on the strategy going forward.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

IPMs will continue to monitor the implications of the increased population on the day-to-day regime at HMP Kilmarnock.

HMP Low Moss

HMP Low Moss
Crosshill 
Bishopbriggs
Glasgow
G64 2PZ

HMP Low Moss

IPM Findings

Overall: Issues raised by prisoners with IPMs this year have followed the national trend, with health, progression, property and visits being the most prominent topic.

Lawful and transparent custody: Processes for reception and admission have been observed to be professional, thorough and efficient. IPMs noted the additional numbers of protection prisoners in HMP Low Moss and the subsequent challenges of offering a full regime.

Decency: IPMs were informed that the heating was not working in Clyde 3 for a number of weeks towards the end of 2018. This issue was raised with prison management. All areas of the prison visited were clean and tidy and in good decorative order. Prisoners told IPMs that facilities were good throughout the prison.

Healthcare: IPMs have taken a small number of requests relating to health and wellbeing, these have centred around medication and waiting times for dental treatment.

Changes and Improvements

Transitions from custody: IPMs continue to report positively on throughcare services in HMP Low Moss with very positive commentary on the work carried out in the Links Centre and elsewhere to assist prisoners in their transition back into the community.

Population: Plans have been put in place to enable HMP Low Moss to take 100 extra prisoners over the summer months to assist with overcrowding across the prison estate.

Personal safety: IPMs noted that two new machines have been purchased this year to enable increased scanning for illicit substances. There is evidence of good proactive work to find and reduce the use of psychoactive substances.

Key Aspects for Continued Monitoring

IPMs will continue to look at the regime offered to protection prisoners in HMP Low Moss in the coming year and also the implications of an increased population.

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